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Vv 4.10 Ucchu Sutta: Sugar Cane Mansion

Moggallana Bhante:

Devata, you shine like the sun which illuminates the sky and the earth. You shine like a great Brahma who shines brighter than Sakka and the Tavatimsa devas. You surpass others with your beauty, fame, and power.

Devata, you are wearing blue lotus garlands, your skin is the color of gold, and you are adorned with beautiful gowns. Now that you are worshiping me, I ask you: who are you?

What kind of meritorious action did you do in the past? Did you practice generosity well, or follow precepts? How were you born in this heaven? I ask you about the action that gave this result.

Devata:

Bhante, in this village where we are now, you came to our house on your almsround. I was pleased to see you. I offered you a small piece of sugar-cane with a delighted heart.

Later, when my mother-in-law came home, she asked me, “Daughter-in-law, where did you put my sugar-cane?” and I told her, “I neither threw it away nor ate it. I offered it to a peaceful monk.” My mother-in-law got very angry. Scolding me, she said, “Hey! Are you the owner of this house or am I? Who makes the decisions here?” She hit me with a stone and I died instantly. I was reborn as a devata in this heaven.

That was the meritorious action I did to enjoy this divine happiness surrounded by gods. The god Sakka protects the Tavatimsa Heaven and the Tavatimsa devas protect me. The result of the offering of a small sugar-cane was not small. It bore great fruit. I enjoy happiness in the heavenly Nandana Park like the god Sakka.

Bhante, you are very compassionate and wise. I came here to ask about your well-being and to worship you. I have received all these wonderful things having offered a small piece of sugar-cane to you with a mind of faith and a joyful heart.


Read this translation of Vimānavatthu 4.10 Ucchu Sutta: Sugar Cane Mansion by Ven. Kiribathgoda Gnananda Thero on SuttaFriends.org. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

You can find the entire translation of the Vimanavatthu: Stories of Heavenly Mansions available on SuttaFriends.org.

AN 10.29 From… Paṭhamakosalasutta: Kosala (1st)

…There comes a time when this cosmos contracts. As it contracts, most sentient beings migrate to the realm of streaming radiance. There they are mind-made, feeding on rapture, self-luminous, moving through the sky, steadily glorious, and they remain like that for a very long time. When the cosmos is contracting, the gods of streaming radiance are said to be the foremost. But even the gods of streaming radiance decay and perish.

Seeing this, a learned noble disciple grows disillusioned with it. Their desire fades away even for the foremost, let alone the inferior.…


Read the entire translation of Aṅguttara Nikāya 10.29 Paṭhamakosalasutta: Kosala (1st) by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net or DhammaTalks.org. Or listen on SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

AN 6.34 Mahāmoggallānasutta: With Mahāmoggallāna

At one time the Buddha was staying near Sāvatthī in Jeta’s Grove, Anāthapiṇḍika’s monastery.

Then as Venerable Mahāmoggallāna was in private retreat this thought came to his mind, “Which gods know that they are stream-enterers, not liable to be reborn in the underworld, bound for awakening?”

Now, at that time a monk called Tissa had recently passed away and been reborn in a Brahmā realm. There they knew that Tissa the Brahmā was very mighty and powerful.

And then Venerable Mahāmoggallāna, as easily as a strong person would extend or contract their arm, vanished from Jeta’s Grove and reappeared in that Brahmā realm.

Tissa saw Moggallāna coming off in the distance, and said to him, “Come, my good Moggallāna! Welcome, my good Moggallāna! It’s been a long time since you took the opportunity to come here. Sit, my good Moggallāna, this seat is for you.” Moggallāna sat down on the seat spread out. Then Tissa bowed to Moggallāna and sat to one side.

Moggallāna said to him, “Tissa, which gods know that they are stream-enterers, not liable to be reborn in the underworld, bound for awakening?”

“The gods of the Four Great Kings know this.”

“But do all of them know this?”

“No, my good Moggallāna, not all of them. Those who lack experiential confidence in the Buddha, the teaching, and the Saṅgha, and lack the ethics loved by the noble ones, do not know that they are stream-enterers. But those who have experiential confidence in the Buddha, the teaching, and the Saṅgha, and have the ethics loved by the noble ones, do know that they are stream-enterers.”

“But Tissa, is it only the gods of the Four Great Kings who know that they are stream-enterers, or do the gods of the Thirty-Three … the Gods of Yama … the Joyful Gods … the Gods Who Love to Create … and the Gods Who Control the Creations of Others know that they are stream-enterers, not liable to be reborn in the underworld, bound for awakening?”

“The gods of these various classes know this.”

“But do all of them know this?”

“No, my good Moggallāna, not all of them. Those who lack experiential confidence in the Buddha, the teaching, and the Saṅgha, and lack the ethics loved by the noble ones, do not know that they are stream-enterers. But those who have experiential confidence in the Buddha, the teaching, and the Saṅgha, and have the ethics loved by the noble ones, do know that they are stream-enterers.”

Moggallāna approved and agreed with what Tissa the Brahmā said. Then, as easily as a strong person would extend or contract their arm, he vanished from that Brahmā realm and reappeared in Jeta’s Grove.


Read this translation of Aṅguttara Nikāya 6.34 Mahāmoggallānasutta: With Mahāmoggallāna by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or listen on SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

Vv 7.5 Amba Sutta: Mango Mansion

Moggallāna Bhante:

Dear Deva, your mansion is very high in the sky and spreads over a hundred and twenty kilometers. Pillars of beryl and other gemstones, and seven hundred pinnacled buildings are in your estate. It is extremely beautiful. Inside the mansion, you drink and eat and enjoy the sweetness of heavenly food. The sweet music of guitars plays. You have many sensual pleasures. Devas are dancing and they are wearing golden jewelry.

What are the meritorious deeds that you have done to gain this happiness and your position as a leader?

Tell me Deva, what kind of meritorious action did you do when you were in the human world to have gained this beauty that shines in all directions, and to have earned all these wonderful things?

That deva, delighted at being questioned by Arahant Moggallāna, gladly explained what he had done that resulted in such great happiness.

Deva:

When I was in the human world, in the last month of the summer, the sun was very hot. There I was the guard of a mango grove and my duty was to watch over the mangoes and water them. One day, the famous Arahant Sāriputta Bhante was passing by the mango grove. He appeared to be very tired, although his mind was never tired.

While I was watering the mango trees, I saw Sāriputta Bhante approaching the grove. I said, “If I could bathe Bhante, it would lead to my happiness.”

Out of pity for me, Sāriputta Bhante set aside his outer robes and bowl and sat down in the shade at the foot of a tree wearing his lower robe. I was so delighted. I bathed the Bhante with clean water while he sat there wearing his lower robe. I watered the mango tree and bathed the Bhante at the same time. The merit I collected was not small. My whole body was filled with joy.

That is the only meritorious action I did in the human world. When I passed away, I was reborn in this Nandana Park. I enjoy living in this park, surrounded by various birds and singing and dancing goddesses.


Read this translation of Vimānavatthu 7.5 Amba Sutta: Mango Mansion by Ven. Kiribathgoda Gnananda Thero on SuttaFriends.org. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

You can find the entire translation of the Vimanavatthu: Stories of Heavenly Mansions available on SuttaFriends.org.

SN 1.1 Oghataraṇasutta: Crossing the Flood

Thus have I heard. On one occasion the Blessed One was dwelling at Savatthi in Jeta’s Grove, Anathapiṇḍika’s Park. Then, when the night had advanced, a certain devatā of stunning beauty, illuminating the entire Jeta’s Grove, approached the Blessed One. Having approached, he paid homage to the Blessed One, stood to one side, and said to him:

“How, dear sir, did you cross the flood?”

“By not halting, friend, and by not straining I crossed the flood.”

“But how is it, dear sir, that by not halting and by not straining you crossed the flood?”

“When I came to a standstill, friend, then I sank; but when I struggled, then I got swept away. It is in this way, friend, that by not halting and by not straining I crossed the flood.”

The devatā:

“After a long time at last I see
A brahmin who is fully quenched,
Who by not halting, not straining,
Has crossed over attachment to the world.”

This is what that devatā said. The Teacher approved. Then that devatā, thinking, “The Teacher has approved of me,” paid homage to the Blessed One and, keeping him on the right, disappeared right there.


Elsewhere, the Buddha talked about four floods (ogha): The floods of sensuality, desire to be reborn, views, and ignorance.

Read this translation of Saṁyutta Nikāya 1.1 Oghataraṇasutta: Crossing the Flood by Bhikkhu Bodhi on SuttaCentral.net. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net or DhammaTalks.org. Or listen on PaliAudio.com or SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

SN 2.20 Anāthapiṇḍikasutta: With Anāthapiṇḍika

[Note: This is one of the few cases of a noble disciple reborn in heaven coming right back to worship the Buddha.]

At Sāvatthī.

Then, late at night, the god Anāthapiṇḍikay, lighting up the entire Jeta’s Grove, went up to the Buddha, bowed, and stood to one side. Standing to one side, the god Anāthapiṇḍika recited these verses in the Buddha’s presence:

“This is indeed that Jeta’s Grove,
frequented by the Saṅgha of hermits,
where the King of Dhamma stayed:
it brings me joy!

Deeds, knowledge, and principle;
ethical conduct, an excellent livelihood;
by these are mortals purified,
not by clan or wealth.

That’s why an astute person,
seeing what’s good for themselves,
would examine the teaching rationally,
and thus be purified in it.

Sāriputta has true wisdom,
ethics, and also peace.
Any mendicant who has gone beyond
can at best equal him.”

This is what the god Anāthapiṇḍika said. Then he bowed and respectfully circled the Buddha, keeping him on his right side, before vanishing right there.

Then, when the night had passed, the Buddha addressed the mendicants: “Mendicants, tonight, a certain glorious god, lighting up the entire Jeta’s Grove, came to me, bowed, stood to one side, and recited these verses in my presence.” The Buddha then repeated the verses in full.

When he said this, Venerable Ānanda said to the Buddha, “Sir, that god must surely have been Anāthapiṇḍika. For the householder Anāthapiṇḍika was devoted to Venerable Sāriputta.”

“Good, good, Ānanda. You’ve reached the logical conclusion, as far as logic goes. For that was indeed the god Anāthapiṇḍika.”


Read this translation of Saṁyutta Nikāya 2.20 Anāthapiṇḍikasutta: With Anāthapiṇḍika by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or listen on PaliAudio.com or SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

MN 36 From… Mahāsaccakasutta: The Greater Discourse to Saccaka

[Note: These incidents took place when the Buddha was striving as the Bodhisatta. If you are not familiar with this time in his life, this is a good sutta to read.]

…“Now when deities saw me, some said: ‘The recluse Gotama is dead.’ Other deities said: ‘The recluse Gotama is not dead, he is dying.’ And other deities said: ‘The recluse Gotama is not dead nor dying; he is an arahant, for such is the way arahants abide.’

“I thought: ‘Suppose I practise entirely cutting off food.’ Then deities came to me and said: ‘Good sir, do not practise entirely cutting off food. If you do so, we shall infuse heavenly food into the pores of your skin and you will live on that.’ I considered: ‘If I claim to be completely fasting while these deities infuse heavenly food into the pores of my skin and I live on that, then I shall be lying.’ So I dismissed those deities, saying: ‘There is no need.’…



Read the entire translation of Majjhima Nikāya 36 Mahāsaccakasutta: The Greater Discourse to Saccaka by Bhikkhu Bodhi on SuttaCentral.net. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net or DhammaTalks.org. Or listen on PaliAudio.com or SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

SN 11.6 Kulāvakasutta: The Bird Nests

[Note: The asuras (sometimes translated as titans) are the arch enemies of Sakka, lord of gods, in the Tavatimsa heaven.]

At Savatthī. “Bhikkhus, once in the past the devas and the asuras were arrayed for battle. In that battle the asuras won and the devas were defeated. In defeat the devas withdrew towards the north while the asuras pursued them. Then Sakka, lord of the devas, addressed his charioteer Matali in verse:

“‘Avoid, O Matali, with your chariot pole
The bird nests in the silk-cotton woods;
Let’s surrender our lives to the asuras
Rather than make these birds nestless.’

“‘Yes, your lordship,’ Matali the charioteer replied, and he turned back the chariot with its team of a thousand thoroughbreds.

“Then, bhikkhus, it occurred to the asuras: ‘Now Sakka’s chariot with its team of a thousand thoroughbreds has turned back. The devas will engage in battle with the asuras for a second time.’ Stricken by fear, they entered the city of the asuras. In this way, bhikkhus, Sakka, lord of the devas, won a victory by means of righteousness itself.”


Read this translation of Saṁyutta Nikāya 11.6 Kulāvakasutta: The Bird Nests by Bhikkhu Bodhi on SuttaCentral.net. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net or SuttaFriends.org. Or listen on PaliAudio.com or SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

SN 9.2 Upaṭṭhānasutta: Getting Up

At one time one of the mendicants was staying in the land of the Kosalans in a certain forest grove.

Now at that time that mendicant fell asleep during the day’s meditation. The deity haunting that forest had compassion for that mendicant, and wanted what’s best for them. So they approached that mendicant wanting to stir them up, and addressed them in verse:

“Get up, mendicant! Why lie down?
What’s the point in sleeping?
How can the afflicted slumber
when injured by an arrow strike?

You should amplify the faith
that led you to go forth
from the home life to homelessness.
Don’t fall under the sway of slumber.”

The monk:

“Sensual pleasures are impermanent and unstable,
but idiots still fall for them.
Among those who are bound,they’re free and unattached:
why bother a renunciate?

By removing desire and greed,
by going beyond ignorance,
that knowledge has been perfectly cleansed:
why bother a renunciate?

By breaking ignorance with knowledge,
by the ending of defilements,
they’re sorrowless, unstressed:
why bother a renunciate?

Energetic, resolute,
always staunchly vigorous,
aspiring to extinguishment:
why bother a renunciate?”


Note: Here we have another case of a deva with good intentions, but not knowing the full situation. The statements that the monk makes indicate that he has already attained stages of enlightenment.

Read Saṁyutta Nikāya 9.2 Upaṭṭhānasutta: Getting Up by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net. Or listen on PaliAudio.com or SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

From… DN 16 Mahāparinibbānasutta: The Great Discourse on the Buddha’s Extinguishment

[Note: This short excerpt from this much longer sutta beings with the Buddha going into and out of successively deeper states of meditation.]

…Then the Buddha entered the first absorption. Emerging from that, he entered the second absorption. Emerging from that, he successively entered into and emerged from the third absorption, the fourth absorption, the dimension of infinite space, the dimension of infinite consciousness, the dimension of nothingness, and the dimension of neither perception nor non-perception. Then he entered the cessation of perception and feeling.

Then Venerable Ānanda said to Venerable Anuruddha, “Venerable Anuruddha, has the Buddha become fully extinguished?”

“No, Reverend Ānanda. He has entered the cessation of perception and feeling.”

Then the Buddha emerged from the cessation of perception and feeling and entered the dimension of neither perception nor non-perception. Emerging from that, he successively entered into and emerged from the dimension of nothingness, the dimension of infinite consciousness, the dimension of infinite space, the fourth absorption, the third absorption, the second absorption, and the first absorption. Emerging from that, he successively entered into and emerged from the second absorption and the third absorption. Then he entered the fourth absorption. Emerging from that the Buddha immediately became fully extinguished.

When the Buddha became fully extinguished, along with the full extinguishment there was a great earthquake, awe-inspiring and hair-raising, and thunder cracked the sky. When the Buddha became fully extinguished, Brahmā Sahampati recited this verse:

“All creatures in this world
must lay down this bag of bones.
For even a Teacher such as this,
unrivaled in the world,
the Realized One, attained to power,
the Buddha became fully extinguished.”

When the Buddha became fully extinguished, Sakka, lord of gods, recited this verse:

“Oh! Conditions are impermanent,
their nature is to rise and fall;
having arisen, they cease;
their stilling is true bliss.”

When the Buddha became fully extinguished, Venerable Anuruddha recited this verse:

“There was no more breathing
for the poised one of steady heart.
Imperturbable, committed to peace,
the sage has done his time.

He put up with painful feelings
without flinching.
The liberation of his heart
was like the extinguishing of a lamp.”

When the Buddha became fully extinguished, Venerable Ānanda recited this verse:

“Then there was terror!
Then they had goosebumps!
When the Buddha, endowed with all fine qualities,
became fully extinguished.”

When the Buddha became fully extinguished, some of the mendicants there, with arms raised, falling down like their feet were chopped off, rolling back and forth, lamented: “Too soon the Blessed One has become fully extinguished! Too soon the Holy One has become fully extinguished! Too soon the seer has vanished from the world!” But the mendicants who were free of desire endured, mindful and aware, thinking, “Conditions are impermanent. How could it possibly be otherwise?”

Then Anuruddha addressed the mendicants: “Enough, reverends, do not grieve or lament. Did the Buddha not prepare us for this when he explained that we must be parted and separated from all we hold dear and beloved? How could it possibly be so that what is born, created, conditioned, and liable to wear out should not wear out? The deities are complaining.”

“But sir, what kind of deities are you thinking of?”

“There are, Ānanda, deities—both in the sky and on the earth—who are percipient of the earth. With hair disheveled and arms raised, they fall down like their feet were chopped off, rolling back and forth, lamenting: ‘Too soon the Blessed One has become fully extinguished! Too soon the Holy One has become fully extinguished! Too soon the seer has vanished from the world!’ But the deities who are free of desire endure, mindful and aware, thinking: ‘Conditions are impermanent. How could it possibly be otherwise?’”

Ānanda and Anuruddha spent the rest of the night talking about Dhamma.…



Read the entire translation of Dīgha Nikāya 16 Mahāparinibbānasutta: The Great Discourse on the Buddha’s Extinguishment by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or read a different translation on DhammaTalks.org, Ancient-Buddhist-Texts.net or AccessToInsight.org. Or listen on PaliAudio.com or SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

Iti 83 Pañcapubbanimittasutta: Five Warning Signs

This was said by the Buddha, the Perfected One: that is what I heard.

“Mendicants, when a god is due to pass away from the realm of the gods, five warning signs appear. Their flower-garlands wither; their clothes become soiled; they sweat from the armpits; their physical appearance deteriorates; and they no longer delight in their heavenly throne. When the other gods know that that god is due to pass away, they wish them well in three ways: ‘Sir, may you go from here to a good place!

When you have gone to a good place, may you be blessed with good fortune!

When you have been blessed with good fortune, may you become well grounded!’

When he said this, one of the mendicants said to the Buddha, “Sir, what do the gods reckon to be going to a good place?

What do they reckon to be blessed with good fortune?

What do they reckon to become well grounded?”

“It is human existence, mendicant, that the gods reckon to be going to a good place.

When a human being gains faith in the teaching and training proclaimed by the Realized One, that is what the gods reckon to be blessed with good fortune.

When that faith in the Realized One is settled, rooted, and planted deep; when it’s strong and can’t be shifted by any ascetic or brahmin or god or Māra or Brahmā or by anyone in the world, that is what the gods reckon to become well grounded.”

The Buddha spoke this matter. On this it is said:

“When, with the fading of life,
a god passes from the realm of the gods,
the gods utter three cries
of well-wishing:

‘Sir, go from here to a good place,
in the company of humans.
As a human being, gain supreme faith
in the true teaching.

May that faith of yours be settled,
with roots planted deep,
unfaltering all life long
in the true teaching so well proclaimed.

Having given up bad conduct
by way of body,
speech, and mind,
and whatever else is corrupt;

and having done much good,
by way of body,
speech, and mind,
limitless, free of attachments;

then, having made much worldly merit
by giving gifts,
establish other colleagues
in the true teaching, the spiritual life.’

It is due to such compassion
that when the gods know a god
is due to pass away, they wish them well:
‘Come back, god, again and again!’

This too is a matter that was spoken by the Blessed One: that is what I heard.


Read this translation of Itivuttaka 83 Pañcapubbanimittasutta: Five Warning Signs by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net, SuttaFriends.org or DhammaTalks.org. Or listen on SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

SN 2.8 Tāyanasutta: With Tāyana

At Sāvatthī.

Then, late at night, the glorious god Tāyana, formerly a religious founder, lighting up the entire Jeta’s Grove, went up to the Buddha, bowed, stood to one side, and recited these verses in the Buddha’s presence:

“Strive and cut the stream!
Dispel sensual pleasures, brahmin.
A sage who doesn’t give up sensual pleasures
is not reborn in a unified state.

If one is to do what should be done,
one should staunchly strive.
For the life gone forth when laxly led
just stirs up dust all the more.

A bad deed is better left undone,
for it will plague you later on.
A good deed is better done,
one that does not plague you.

When kusa grass is wrongly grasped
it only cuts the hand.
So too, the ascetic life, when wrongly taken,
drags you to hell.

Any lax act,
any corrupt observance,
or suspicious spiritual life,
is not very fruitful.”

That’s what the god Tāyana said. Then he bowed and respectfully circled the Buddha, keeping him on his right side, before vanishing right there.

Then, when the night had passed, the Buddha told the mendicants all that had happened.

“Mendicants, tonight, the glorious god Tāyana, formerly a religious founder, lighting up the entire Jeta’s Grove, came to me, bowed, stood to one side, and recited these verses in my presence.” The Buddha repeated the verses in full, adding:

“That’s what the god Tāyana said. Then he bowed and respectfully circled me, keeping me on his right side, before vanishing right there. Mendicants, learn the verses of Tāyana! Memorize the verses of Tāyana! Remember the verses of Tāyana! These verses are beneficial and relate to the fundamentals of the spiritual life.”


Read this translation of Saṁyutta Nikāya 2.8 Tāyanasutta: With Tāyana by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or listen on PaliAudio.com or SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

SN 1.12 Nandatisutta: Delight

Thus have I heard. On one occasion the Blessed One was dwelling at Savatthi in Jeta’s Grove, Anathapiṇḍika’s Park. Then, when the night had advanced, a certain devatā of stunning beauty, illuminating the entire Jeta’s Grove, approached the Blessed One. Having approached, he paid homage to the Blessed One and stood to one side. Standing to one side, that devatā recited this verse in the presence of the Blessed One:

“One who has sons delights in sons,
One with cattle delights in cattle.
Acquisitions truly are a man’s delight;
Without acquisitions one does not delight.”

The Blessed One:

“One who has sons sorrows over sons,
One with cattle sorrows over cattle.
Acquisitions truly are a man’s sorrows;
Without acquisitions one does not sorrow.”



For a longer sutta on this topic, read MN 87 Piyajātika Sutta.

Read this translation of Saṁyutta Nikāya 1.12 Nandatisutta: Delight by Bhikkhu Bodhi on SuttaCentral.net. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net or SuttaFriends.org. Or listen on PaliAudio.com or SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

SN 6.13 Andhakavindasutta: At Andhakavinda

At one time the Buddha was staying in the land of the Magadhans at Andhakavinda.

Now at that time the Buddha was meditating in the open during the dark of night, while a gentle rain drizzled down.

Then, late at night, the beautiful Brahmā Sahampati, lighting up the entirety of Andhakavinda, went up to the Buddha, bowed, stood to one side, and recited these verses in the Buddha’s presence:

“One should frequent secluded lodgings,
and practice to be released from fetters.
If you don’t find enjoyment there,
live in the Saṅgha, guarded and mindful.

Walking for alms from family to family,
with senses guarded, alert and mindful.
One should frequent secluded lodgings,
free of fear, freed in the fearless.

Where dreadful serpents slither,
where the lightning flashes and the sky thunders
in the dark of the night;
there meditates a mendicant, free of goosebumps.

For this has in fact been seen by me,
it isn’t just what the testament says.
Within a single spiritual dispensation
a thousand are conquerors of Death.

And of trainees there are more than five hundred,
and ten times ten tens;
all are stream-enterers,
freed from rebirth in the animal realm.

And as for other people
who I think have shared in merit—
I couldn’t even number them,
for fear of speaking falsely.”


Read this translation of Saṁyutta Nikāya 6.13 Andhakavindasutta: At Andhakavinda by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net or SuttaFriends.org. Or listen on PaliAudio.com or SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

AN 8.22 From… Dutiyauggasutta: With Ugga of the Village of Hatthi

[Note: these are just two of the eight amazing qualities that the Buddha declared of the householder Ugga.]

…It’s not unusual for deities to come to me when the Saṅgha has been invited and announce: ‘Householder, that mendicant is freed both ways. That one is freed by wisdom. That one is a personal witness. That one is attained to view. That one is freed by faith. That one is a follower of the teachings. That one is a follower by faith. That one is ethical, of good character. That one is unethical, of bad character.’ But while I’m serving the Saṅgha I don’t recall thinking: ‘Let me give this one just a little, and that one a lot.’ Rather, I give impartially. This is the sixth incredible and amazing quality found in me.

It’s not unusual for deities to come to me and announce: ‘Householder, the Buddha’s teaching is well explained!’ When they say this I say to them: ‘The Buddha’s teaching is well explained, regardless of whether or not you deities say so!’ But I don’t recall getting too excited by the fact that the deities come to me, and I have a conversation with them. This is the seventh incredible and amazing quality found in me.…


Read the entire translation of Aṅguttara Nikāya 8.22 Dutiyauggasutta: With Ugga of the Village of Hatthi by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or read a different translation on DhammaTalks.org. Or listen on SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

SN 2.22 Khemasutta: With Khema

Standing to one side, the god Khema recited these verses in the Buddha’s presence:

“Witless fools behave
like their own worst enemies,
doing wicked deeds
that ripen as bitter fruit.

It’s not good to do a deed
that plagues you later on,
for which you weep and wail,
as its effect stays with you.

It is good to do a deed
that doesn’t plague you later on,
that gladdens and cheers,
as its effect stays with you.”

The Buddha:

“As a precaution, you should do
what you know is for your own welfare.
A thinker, a wise one would not proceed
thinking like the cart driver.

Suppose a cart driver leaves the highway,
so even and well compacted.
They enter upon a rough road,
and fret when their axle breaks.

So too, an idiot departs the good
to follow what’s against the good.
Fallen in the jaws of death,
they fret like their axle’s broken.”


Another good sutta about results of bad actions is AN 6.45 Iṇa Sutta: Debt.

Read this translation of Saṁyutta Nikāya 2.22 Khemasutta: With Khema by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or read a different translation on DhammaTalks.org. Or listen on PaliAudio.com or SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

AN 3.37 Catumahārājasutta: The Four Great Kings (1st)

[Note: The Gods of the Four Great Kings live in the lowest deva realm. The eighth and fourteenth of the fortnight and the fifteenth day sabbath are all uposatha days when the Buddha encouraged his lay disciples to follow the eight precepts. For more on the eight precepts, see AN 8.43 Visākhūposatha.]

“On the eighth day of the fortnight, mendicants, the ministers and counselors of the Four Great Kings wander about the world, thinking: ‘Hopefully most humans are paying due respect to their parents, ascetics and brahmins, honoring the elders in their families, observing and keeping vigil on the sabbath, and making merit.’

And on the fourteenth day of the fortnight, the sons of the Four Great Kings wander about the world, thinking: ‘Hopefully most humans are paying due respect to their parents … and making merit.’

And on the fifteenth day sabbath, the Four Great Kings themselves wander about the world, thinking: ‘Hopefully most humans are paying due respect to their parents … and making merit.’

If only a few humans are paying due respect to their parents … and making merit, then the Four Great Kings address the gods of the Thirty-Three, seated together in the Hall of Justice: ‘Only a few humans are paying due respect to their parents … and making merit.’ Then the gods of the Thirty-Three are disappointed, thinking, ‘The heavenly hosts will dwindle, while the demon hosts will swell!’

But if many humans are paying due respect to their parents … and making merit, then the Four Great Kings address the gods of the Thirty-Three, seated together in the Hall of Justice: ‘Many humans are paying due respect to their parents … and making merit.’ Then the gods of the Thirty-Three are pleased, thinking, ‘The heavenly hosts will swell, while the demon hosts will dwindle!’

Once upon a time, Sakka, lord of gods, guiding the gods of the Thirty-Three, recited this verse:

‘Whoever wants to be like me
would observe the sabbath
complete in all eight factors,
on the fourteenth and the fifteenth days,
and the eighth day of the fortnight,
as well as on the fortnightly special displays.’

But that verse was poorly sung by Sakka, lord of gods, not well sung; poorly spoken, not well spoken. Why is that? Sakka, lord of gods, is not free of greed, hate, and delusion.

But for a mendicant who is perfected—with defilements ended, who has completed the spiritual journey, done what had to be done, laid down the burden, achieved their own true goal, utterly ended the fetters of rebirth, and is rightly freed through enlightenment—it is appropriate to say:

‘Whoever wants to be like me
would observe the sabbath,
complete in all eight factors,
on the fourteenth and the fifteenth days,
and the eighth day of the fortnight,
as well as on the fortnightly special displays.’

Why is that? Because that mendicant is free of greed, hate, and delusion.”


Read this translation of Aṅguttara Nikāya 3.37 Catumahārājasutta: The Four Great Kings (1st) by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net. Or listen on PaliAudio.com or SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

AN 4.33 Sīhasutta: The Lion

“Mendicants, towards evening the lion, king of beasts, emerges from his den, yawns, looks all around the four quarters, and roars his lion’s roar three times. Then he sets out on the hunt. And the animals who hear the roar of the lion, king of beasts, are typically filled with fear, awe, and terror. They return to their lairs, be they in a hole, the water, or a wood; and the birds take to the air. Even the royal elephants, bound with strong harnesses in the villages, towns, and capital cities, break apart their bonds, and urinate and defecate in terror as they flee here and there. That’s how powerful is the lion, king of beasts, among animals, how illustrious and mighty.

In the same way, when a Realized One arises in the world—perfected, a fully awakened Buddha, accomplished in knowledge and conduct, holy, knower of the world, supreme guide for those who wish to train, teacher of gods and humans, awakened, blessed—he teaches the Dhamma: ‘Such is identity, such is the origin of identity, such is the cessation of identity, such is the practice that leads to the cessation of identity.’

Now, there are gods who are long-lived, beautiful, and very happy, lasting long in their divine palaces. When they hear this teaching by the Realized One, they’re typically filled with fear, awe, and terror. ‘Oh no! It turns out we’re impermanent, though we thought we were permanent! It turns out we don’t last, though we thought we were everlasting! It turns out we’re transient, though we thought we were eternal! It turns out that we’re impermanent, not lasting, transient, and included within identity.’

That’s how powerful is the Realized One in the world with its gods, how illustrious and mighty.

The Buddha, the teacher without a peer
in all the world with its gods,
rolls forth the Wheel of Dhamma
from his own insight:

identity, its cessation,
the origin of identity,
and the noble eightfold path
that leads to the stilling of suffering.

And then the long-lived gods,
so beautiful and famous,
are afraid and full of terror,
like the other beasts when they hear a lion.

‘We haven’t transcended identity!
It turns out we’re impermanent!’
So they say when they hear the word
of the perfected one, free and poised.”


Read this translation of Aṅguttara Nikāya 4.33 Sīhasutta: The Lion Sīhasutta by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net or DhammaTalks.org. Or listen on PaliAudio.com or SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

Dhp 174–176 From… Lokavagga: The World

Blind is the world,
few are those who clearly see.
Only a handful go to heaven,
like a bird freed from a net.

The miserly don’t ascend to heaven,
it takes a fool to not praise giving.
The wise celebrate giving,
and so find happiness in the hereafter.

The fruit of stream-entry is better
than being the one king of the earth,
than going to heaven,
than lordship over all the world.


Read the entire translation of Dhammapada 167–178 Lokavagga by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net, SuttaFriends.org, DhammaTalks.org, Ancient-Buddhist-Texts.net or AccessToInsight.org. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

SN 1.73 Vittasutta: Treasure

Thus have I heard. On one occasion the Blessed One was dwelling at Savatthi in Jeta’s Grove, Anathapiṇḍika’s Park. Then, when the night had advanced, a certain devatā of stunning beauty, illuminating the entire Jeta’s Grove, approached the Blessed One. Having approached, he paid homage to the Blessed One and stood to one side. Standing to one side, that devatā recited this verse in the presence of the Blessed One:

“What here is a man’s best treasure?
What practised well brings happiness?
What is really the sweetest of tastes?
How lives the one whom they say lives best?”

The Blessed One:

“Faith is here a man’s best treasure;
Dhamma practised well brings happiness;
Truth is really the sweetest of tastes;
One living by wisdom they say lives best.”


Read this translation of Saṁyutta Nikāya 1.73 Vittasutta: Treasure by Bhikkhu Bodhi on SuttaCentral.net. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net. Or listen on PaliAudio.com or SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

SN 1.51 Jarāsutta: Old Age

At Sāvatthī.

Then, late at night, a glorious deity, lighting up the entire Jeta’s Grove, went up to the Buddha, bowed, and stood to one side. Standing to one side, that deity recited this verse in the Buddha’s presence:

“What’s still good in old age?
What’s good when grounded?
What is people’s treasure?
What’s hard for thieves to take?”

The Buddha:

“Ethics are still good in old age.
Faith is good when grounded.
Wisdom is people’s treasure.
Merit’s hard for thieves to take.”


Read this translation of Saṁyutta Nikāya 1.51 Jarāsutta: Old Age Jarāsutta by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net or DhammaTalks.org. Or listen on PaliAudio.com or SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

SN 9.1 Viveka Sutta: Seclusion

[NOTE: Devatā is the Pali word for a type of god. Some devatās are bound to the earth and live in forests like the one in this sutta.]

I have heard that on one occasion a certain monk was staying among the Kosalans in a forest grove. Now at that time, as he had gone to spend the day in the grove, he was thinking unskillful thoughts, connected with the household life.

Then the devatā inhabiting the forest grove, feeling sympathy for the monk, desiring his benefit, desiring to bring him to his senses, approached him and addressed him with this verse:

“Desiring seclusion
you’ve entered the forest,
and yet your mind
goes running outside.
You, a person:
subdue your desire for people.
Then you’ll be happy, free
          from passion.
Dispel discontent,
be mindful.
Let me remind you
of that which is good—
for the dust
of the regions below
     is hard to transcend.
Don’t let the dust
of the sensual
pull
     you
          down.

     As a bird
spattered with dirt
sheds the adhering dust with a shake,
     so a monk
—energetic & mindful—
sheds the adhering dust.”

The monk, chastened by the devatā, came to his senses.


Read this translation of Saṁyutta Nikāya 9.1 Viveka Sutta. Seclusion by Bhikkhu Ṭhanissaro on DhammaTalks.org. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net. Or listen on PaliAudio.com or SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

SN 1.24 Manonivāraṇasutta: Shielding the Mind

[NOTE: This sutta shows a common situation where a god has learned a bit of Dhamma, but their understanding is incomplete or incorrect in some way. Out of compassion, the Buddha corrects their understanding.]

At Sāvatthī.

Then, late at night, a glorious deity, lighting up the entire Jeta’s Grove, went up to the Buddha, bowed, and stood to one side. Standing to one side, that deity recited this verse in the Buddha’s presence:

“Whatever you’ve shielded the mind from
can’t cause you suffering.
So you should shield the mind from everything,
then you’re freed from all suffering.”

The Buddha:

“You needn’t shield the mind from everything.
When the mind is under control,
you need only shield the mind
from where the bad things come.


Read this translation of Saṁyutta Nikāya 1.24 Manonivāraṇasutta: Shielding the Mind by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net or SuttaFriends.org. Or listen on PaliAudio.com or SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

Vv 3.9 Visālakkhī Sutta: Mansion of the Beautiful-Eyed Goddess

God Sakka:

Devata, with large beautiful eyes you walk around surrounded by many other goddesses in the delightful Cittalata Forest. What is your name?

When the gods of the Tavatimsa Heaven enter this forest their bodies, horses, and chariots become more beautiful.

Even though you are not wearing any golden flower jewelry, you are still extremely beautiful. Tell us, what meritorious deed have you done to gain this beauty?

Devata:

Lord of Devas, I have received this heavenly birth, beautiful body, and divine psychic powers due to my meritorious deeds. I will tell you what I did.

In the human world, I lived in the beautiful city of Rajagaha. My name was Sunanda and I was a female lay disciple of the Supreme Buddha. I had faith, virtue and was very generous. I had great confidence in the noble monks with pure minds. I offered them robes, food, resting places, and lamps.

I was eager to observe the Eight Precepts four times a month on each of the four moon phases. I led a restrained life and delighted in sharing.

I abstained from killing, stealing, lying, and taking intoxicants. I did not cheat on my husband. I was delighted to keep these Five Precepts every day. I was a lay follower of Gautama Supreme Buddha who had the great wisdom to see the reality of the world. I was wise enough to realize the Four Noble Truths.

A servant girl, working for my relatives, used to bring me flower garlands every day. I offered all those flower garlands with a happy mind to the relic stupa of the Supreme Buddha. I also went to relic puja ceremonies every Eight Precepts-Observance day. With great faith, I personally offered garlands, perfumes, and lotions to the stupa. God Sakka, I received this heavenly birth, beautiful body, and divine psychic powers by offering flower garlands.

I also collected merit by keeping the precepts, but that merit has not yet ripened. Lord Sakka, in my mind I have the desire to be a once-returner.


Read this translation of Vimānavatthu 3.9 Visālakkhī Sutta: Mansion of the Beautiful-Eyed Goddess by Ven. Kiribathgoda Gnananda Thero on SuttaFriends.org. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

You can find the entire translation of the Vimanavatthu: Stories of Heavenly Mansions available on SuttaFriends.org.

AN 3.127 Hatthakasutta: With Hatthaka

With Hatthaka

At one time the Buddha was staying near Sāvatthī in Jeta’s Grove, Anāthapiṇḍika’s monastery.

Then, late at night, the glorious god Hatthaka, lighting up the entire Jeta’s Grove, went up to the Buddha. Thinking, “I will stand before the Buddha,” he sank and melted down, and wasn’t able to stay still. It’s like when ghee or oil is poured on sand, it sinks and melts down, and can’t remain stable.

Then the Buddha said to Hatthaka, “Hatthaka, manifest in a solid life-form.”

“Yes, sir,” replied Hatthaka. He manifested in a solid life-form, bowed to the Buddha, and stood to one side.

The Buddha said to him, “Hatthaka, I wonder whether you still rehearse now the teachings that you rehearsed when you were a human being?”

“I still rehearse now the teachings that I rehearsed as a human being. And I also rehearse teachings that I didn’t rehearse as a human being.

Just as the Buddha these days lives crowded by monks, nuns, laymen, and laywomen; by rulers and their ministers, and teachers of other paths and their disciples, so I live crowded by the gods. The gods come from far away, thinking, ‘We’ll hear the teaching in the presence of Hatthaka.’

Sir, I passed away without getting enough of three things. What three? Seeing the Buddha; hearing the true teaching; and serving the Saṅgha. I passed away without getting enough of these three things.

I could never get enough
of seeing the Buddha,
serving the Saṅgha,
or hearing the teaching.

Training in the higher ethics,
loving to hear the true teaching,
Hatthaka has gone to the Aviha realm
without getting enough of these three things.”


Read this translation of Aṅguttara Nikāya 3.127 Hatthakasutta: With Hatthaka by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or listen on PaliAudio.com or SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

SN 1.40 Dutiyapajjunnadhītusuttaṁ: With Pajjunna’s Daughter (2nd)

So I have heard. At one time the Buddha was staying near Vesālī, at the Great Wood, in the hall with the peaked roof.

Then, late at night, the beautiful Kokanadā the Younger, Pajjunna’s daughter, lighting up the entire Great Wood, went up to the Buddha, bowed, stood to one side, and recited these verses in the Buddha’s presence:

“Kokanadā, Pajjunna’s daughter, came here,
beautiful as a flash of lightning.
Revering the Buddha and the teaching,
she spoke these verses full of meaning.

The teaching is such that
I could analyze it in many different ways.
However, I will state the meaning in brief
as far as I have learned it by heart.

You should never do anything bad
by speech or mind or body in all the world.
Having given up sensual pleasures,
     mindful and aware,
you shouldn’t keep doing
     what’s painful and pointless.”



Read this translation of Saṁyutta Nikāya 1.40 Dutiyapajjunnadhītusuttaṁ: With Pajjunna’s Daughter (2nd) by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net. Or listen on PaliAudio.com or SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

SN 2.7 Pañcālacaṇḍasutta: With Pañcālacaṇḍa


At Sāvatthī.

Standing to one side, the god Pañcālacaṇḍa recited this verse in the Buddha’s presence:

“The opening amid confinement
was discovered by the Buddha of vast intelligence,
who woke up to absorption,
the sage, the solitary bull.”

“Even amid confinement they discover,”
said the Buddha to Pañcālacaṇḍa,
“the principle for attaining extinguishment.
Those who have acquired mindfulness
are perfectly serene in samādhi.”


Read this translation of Saṁyutta Nikāya 2.7 Pañcālacaṇḍasutta: With Pañcālacaṇḍa by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or read a different translation on DhammaTalks.org. Or listen on PaliAudio.com or SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

SN 11.11 Vatapadasutta: Vows

At Savatthī. “Bhikkhus, in the past, when Sakka, lord of the devas, was a human being, he adopted and undertook seven vows by the undertaking of which he achieved the status of Sakka. What were the seven vows?

  1. “‘As long as I live may I support my parents.’
  2. “‘As long as I live may I respect the family elders.’
  3. “‘As long as I live may I speak gently.’
  4. “‘As long as I live may I not speak divisively.’
  5. “‘As long as I live may I dwell at home with a mind devoid of the stain of stinginess, freely generous, open-handed, delighting in relinquishment, devoted to charity, delighting in giving and sharing.’
  6. “‘As long as I live may I speak the truth.’
  7. “‘As long as I live may I be free from anger, and if anger should arise in me may I dispel it quickly.’

“In the past, bhikkhus, when Sakka, lord of the devas, was a human being, he adopted and undertook these seven vows by the undertaking of which he achieved the status of Sakka.

“When a person supports his parents,
And respects the family elders;
When his speech is gentle and courteous,
And he refrains from divisive words;

When he strives to remove meanness,
Is truthful, and vanquishes anger,
The Tavatiṁsa devas call him
Truly a superior person.”


Read this translation of Saṁyutta Nikāya 11.11 Vatapadasutta: Vows by Bhikkhu Bodhi on SuttaCentral.net. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net or SuttaFriends.org. Or listen on PaliAudio.com or SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

SN 2.6 Kāmadasutta: With Kāmada

At Sāvatthī.

Standing to one side, the god Kāmada said to the Buddha, “It’s too hard, Blessed One! It’s just too hard!”

“They do it even though it’s hard,”
said the Buddha to Kāmada,
“the stable trainees with ethics, and immersion.
For one who has entered the homeless life,
contentment brings happiness.”

“Such contentment, Blessed One, is hard to find.”

“They find it even though it’s hard,”
said the Buddha to Kāmada,
“those who love peace of mind;
whose minds love to meditate
day and night.”

“But it’s hard, Blessed One, to immerse this mind in samādhi.”

“They become immersed in samādhi
even though it’s hard,”
said the Buddha to Kāmada,
“those who love calming the faculties.
Having cut through the net of Death,
the noble ones, Kāmada, go on their way.”

“But this path, Blessed One, is rough and hard to travel.”

“Though it’s rough, hard to travel,
the noble ones, Kāmada, go on their way.
The ignoble fall headfirst
on a rough path.
But the path of the noble ones is smooth,
for the noble ones are smooth amid the rough.”


Read this translation of Saṁyutta Nikāya 2.6 Kāmadasutta: With Kāmada by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net. Or listen on PaliAudio.com or SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

SN 9.13 Pākatindriyasutta: Undisciplined Faculties

At one time several mendicants were staying in the Kosalan lands in a certain forest grove. They were restless, insolent, fickle, scurrilous, loose-tongued, unmindful, lacking situational awareness and immersion, with straying minds and undisciplined faculties.

The deity haunting that forest had compassion for those mendicants, and wanted what’s best for them. So they approached those mendicants wanting to stir them up, and addressed them in verse:

“The mendicants used to live happily,
as disciples of Gotama.
Desireless they sought alms;
desireless they used their lodgings.
Knowing that the world was impermanent
they made an end of suffering.

But now they’ve made themselves hard to look after,
like chiefs in a village.
They eat and eat and then lie down,
unconscious in the homes of others.

Having raised my joined palms to the Saṅgha,
I speak here only about certain people.
They’re rejects, with no protector,
just like those who have passed away.

I’m speaking about
those who live negligently.
To those who live diligently
I pay homage.”

Impelled by that deity, those mendicants were struck with a sense of urgency.


Read this translation of Saṁyutta Nikāya 9.13 Pākatindriyasutta: Undisciplined Faculties by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or listen on PaliAudio.com or SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

MN 12 From… Mahāsīhanādasutta: The Greater Discourse on the Lion‘s Roar—The Path to Heaven

“Sāriputta, using my own mind I might know the mind of a particular person: ‘This person is practicing and behaving in such a way, they have taken on such a path, that when this person is separated from the body after death, this person will appear in a good destination, in a heavenly world.’ Then on a later occasion, using divine vision which is pure and surpasses human vision, I see that when that person was separated from the body after death, they appeared in the world of devas, experiencing entirely pleasant feelings.

Sāriputta, it is just as if there was a palace with a peaked roof, plastered walls, impervious to wind, with lockable doors and shutters on the windows. In it there is a couch covered in cowhide, wool, embroidered blankets, and deer-hide blankets, with a canopy overhead and red pillows on both sides. Then a person comes who is scorched by heat, overwhelmed by heat, exhausted, dehydrated, and thirsty, going along a one-way road that leads to that palace. A person with eyes who saw that would say, ‘Based on how that person is practicing and behaving, based on the path that person has taken, that person will come to this particular palace.’ Then on a later occasion, they might see that person in that peaked-roof palace, sitting or reclining on the couch, experiencing entirely pleasant feelings.

In exactly the same way, Sāriputta, using my own mind I might know the mind of a particular person: ‘This person is practicing and behaving in such a way, they have taken on such a path, that when this person is separated from the body after death, this person will appear in a good destination, in a heavenly world.’ Then on a later occasion, using divine vision which is pure and surpasses human vision, I see that when that person was separated from the body after death, they appeared in a good destination, in a heavenly world, experiencing entirely pleasant feelings.


Read the entire translation of Majjhima Nikāya 12 Mahāsīhanādasutta: 12. The Greater Discourse on the Lion‘s Roar by Suddhāso Bhikkhu on SuttaCentral.net. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net or DhammaTalks.org. Or listen on PaliAudio.com or SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.