Dhp 41 From… Cittavaggo: The Chapter about the Mind

Before long has passed by, alas,
this body will lie on the ground,
rejected, without consciousness,
just like a useless piece of wood.



Read the entire translation of Dhammapada Ch3 Cittavagga: by Bhikkhu Ānandajoti on Ancient-BuddhistTexts.net. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net, SuttaFriends.org, DhammaTalks.org, or AccessToInsight.org. Or listen on Voice.SuttaCentral.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

Ud 3.10 Lokavolokanasuttaṁ: The Discourse about Looking Around the World

Thus I heard: at one time the Fortunate One was dwelling near Uruvelā, on the bank of the river Nerañjarā, at the root of the Awakening tree, in the first (period) after attaining Awakening.

Then at that time the Fortunate One was sitting in one cross-legged posture for seven days experiencing the happiness of freedom.

Then with the passing of those seven days the Fortunate One, after rising from that concentration, looked around the world with his Buddha-eye. The Fortunate One looking around the world with his Buddha-eye saw beings being tormented with many torments, and being burned with many fevers, born from passion, and born from hatred, and born from delusion.

Then the Fortunate One, having understood the significance of it, on that occasion uttered this exalted utterance:

“This world, overcome by contact, is tormented,
It speaks of a disease as the self,
For with whatever it conceives
Hereafter it becomes otherwise.

Continually becoming other, the world is shackled by continuity, overcome by continuity,

It greatly rejoices in continuity,
What it rejoices in, that is fearful,
What it fears, that is suffering.

This spiritual life is lived for the complete giving up of continuity. For whatever the ascetics or brāhmaṇas say about freedom from continuity being through (further) continuity, all of them are not free from continuity, I say. Or whatever the ascetics or brāhmaṇas say about the escape from continuity being through discontinuity, all of them have not escaped from continuity, I say.

Conditioned by cleaving this suffering originates, through the destruction of all attachment there is no origination of suffering. See this world overcome by many kinds of ignorance beings, who delight in beings, are not free from continuity. Whatever continuities (in existence) there are, everywhere, in every respect, all those continuities are impermanent, suffering, changeable things.

Seeing it like this, as it really is, with right wisdom,
Craving for continuity is given up, and he does not rejoice in discontinuity.

From the complete destruction of craving there is a fading away (of ignorance) without remainder, cessation, and Emancipation.

For that monk who is emancipated,
Without attachment, there is no continuity in existence.
He has vanquished Māra, is victorious in battle,
He is such a one who has overcome all continuations (in existence).”


Read this translation of Ud 3.10 Lokavolokanasuttaṁ: The Discourse about Looking Around the World by Bhikkhu Ānandajoti on DhammaTalks.org, or Ancient-Buddhist-Texts.net. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net or SuttaFriends.org.

SN 44.1 From Khemāsutta: Khemā Therī’s Wisdom

…Then the Kosalan King Pasenadi approached the nun Khemā, and after approaching and worshipping the nun Khemā, he sat down on one side.

While sitting on one side the Kosalan King Pasenadi said this to the nun Khemā:

“How is it, Noble Lady, does the Realised One exist after death?

“This has not been answered, Great King, by the Fortunate One: ‘Does the Realised One exist after death?’”

“But how is it, Noble Lady, does the Realised One not exist after death?

“This has not been answered, Great King, by the Fortunate One: ‘Does the Realised One not exist after death?’”

“How is it, Noble Lady, does the Realised One exist and not exist after death?

“This has not been answered, Great King, by the Fortunate One: ‘Does the Realised One exist and not exist after death?’”

“But how is it, Noble Lady, does the Realised One neither exist nor not exist after death?

“This has not been answered, Great King, by the Fortunate One: ‘Does the Realised One neither exist nor not exist after death?’”

“‘How is it, Noble Lady, does the Realised One exist after death?’ – when there is this question, you say: ‘This has not been answered, Great King, by the Fortunate One: “Does the Realised One exist after death?”’

‘But how is it, Noble Lady, does the Realised One not exist after death?’ – when there is this question, you say: ‘This has not been answered, Great King, by the Fortunate One: “Does the Realised One not exist after death?”’

When there is this question, you say: ‘This has not been answered, Great King, by the Fortunate One: “Does the Realised One exist and not exist after death?”’

‘How is it, Noble Lady, does the Realised One neither exist nor not exist after death?’ – when there is this question, you say: ‘This has not been answered, Great King, by the Fortunate One: “Does the Realised One neither exist nor not exist after death?” ’

What is the cause, Noble Lady, what is the reason, why does the Fortunate One not answer this?”

“Now then, Great King, here I will ask you something in return, as you see fit, so you should answer.

What do you think, Great King, do you have a mathematician, or a calculator or an accountant who is able to count the amount of sand in the Ganges, saying: there is this much sand, or there are so many hundreds of grains of sand, or there are so many thousands of grains of sand, or there are so many hundreds of thousands of grains of sand?

“Certainly not, Noble Lady.”

“But do you have a mathematician, or a calculator or an accountant who is able to measure the water in the great ocean, saying: there are this many gallons of water, or there are this many hundreds of gallons of water, or there are this many thousands of gallons of water, or there are this many hundreds of thousands of gallons of water?”

“Certainly not, Noble Lady. What is the cause of that? Great is the ocean, Noble Lady, deep, immeasurable, hard to fathom.”

“Just so, Great King, through knowing whatever bodily form a Realised One can be known by, that form the Realised One has abandoned, cut off at the root, made a palm stump, made unviable, so that by nature it is unable to rise again in the future.

The Realised One, Great King, is free from being considered as bodily form, he is deep, immeasurable, hard to fathom, like the great ocean.

‘Does the Realised One exist after death?’ does not apply,
‘Does the Realised One not exist after death?’ does not apply,
‘Does the Realised One exist and not exist after death?’ does not apply,
‘Does the Realised One neither exist nor not exist after death?’ does not apply.


Read the complete translation of SN 44.1 Khemāsutta: Khemā Therī’s Wisdom by Bhikkhu Ānandajoti on Ancient-Buddhist-Texts.net. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net or DhammaTalks.org.

DN 16 From Mahāparinibbānasuttaṁ: The Discourse about the Great Emancipation—The Four Places

…“Formerly, reverend Sir, the monks, having dwelt for the Rains Retreat used to come to see the Realised One, and we would receive those meditating monks for assembling and seeing the Realised One. But after the Fortunate One has passed way, reverend Sir, we will not receive those meditating monks for assembling and seeing the Realised One.”

“There are these four places that can be seen, that produce enthusiasm, Ānanda, for a faithful man of good family.

Which four?

  • Thinking: ‘Here the Realised One was born’, Ānanda, that is a place to be seen that produces enthusiasm for a faithful man of good family.
  • Thinking: ‘Here the Realised One awoke to the unsurpassed and Perfect Awakening’, Ānanda, that is a place to be seen that produces enthusiasm for a faithful man of good family.
  • Thinking: ‘Here the Realised One set rolling the Wheel of the Teaching’, Ānanda, that is a place to be seen that produces enthusiasm for a faithful man of good family.
  • Thinking: ‘Here the Realised One was completely Emancipated in the Emancipation-element which has no basis for attachment remaining’, Ānanda, that is a place to be seen that produces enthusiasm for a faithful man of good family.

These are the four places, Ānanda, that are to be seen that produce enthusiasm for a faithful man of good family.

Faithful monks, nuns, laymen, and laywomen will come, thinking: ‘Here the Realised One was born’, ‘Here the Realised One awoke to the unsurpassed and Perfect Awakening’, ‘Here the Realised One set rolling the Wheel of the Teaching’, ‘Here the Realised One was Finally Emancipated in the Emancipation-element which has no basis for attachment remaining’, and whoever, Ānanda, will die while on pilgrimage to the Shrines with a confident mind they will all, at the break-up of the body, after death, re-arise in a fortunate destiny, in a heavenly world.”…


Read the entire translation of DN 16 Mahāparinibbānasuttaṁ: The Discourse about the Great Emancipation by Ānandajoti Bhikkhu on Ancient-Buddhist-Texts.net. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net or DhammaTalks.org.

Dhp 14 From… Buddhavaggo: The Chapter about the Buddha

188. Many people shaken
by fear go for refuge
to woods, mountains, and to
tree shrines in pleasure parks.

189. That is not a secure refuge,
that is not the refuge supreme,
that is not the refuge that will
liberate from all suffering.

190. Whoever has gone for refuge
to the Buddha, to the Dhamma
and to the Saṅgha, who sees with
right wisdom the four noble truths:

191. Suffering, arising, and the
overcoming of suffering,
the eightfold noble path leading
to the stilling of suffering.

192. That is the one secure refuge,
that is the one refuge supreme,
that is the one refuge that will
liberate from all suffering.


Read this translation from Dhammapada chapter 14 Buddhavaggo: The Chapter about the Buddha by Bhikkhu Ānandajoti on Ancient-Buddhist-Texts.net. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net, SuttaFriends.org, or DhammaTalks.org.