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Ud 4.4 Juñha Sutta: Moonlit

I have heard that on one occasion the Blessed One was staying near Rājagaha at the Bamboo Forest, the Squirrels’ Sanctuary. And on that occasion Ven. Sāriputta and Ven. Mahā Moggallāna were staying in Pigeon Cave. Then, on a moonlit night, Ven. Sāriputta–his head newly shaven–was sitting in the open air, having attained a certain level of concentration.

And on that occasion two yakkhas who were companions were flying from north to south on some business or other. They saw Ven. Sāriputta–his head newly shaven–sitting in the open air. Seeing him, the first yakkha said to the second, “I’m inspired to give this contemplative a blow on the head.”

When this was said, the second yakkha said to the first, “Enough of that, my good friend. Don’t lay a hand on the contemplative. He’s an outstanding contemplative, of great power & great might.”

A second time, the first yakkha said to the second, “I’m inspired to give this contemplative a blow on the head.”

A second time, the second yakkha said to the first, “Enough of that, my good friend. Don’t lay a hand on the contemplative. He’s an outstanding contemplative, of great power & great might.”

A third time, the first yakkha said to the second, “I’m inspired to give this contemplative a blow on the head.”

A third time, the second yakkha said to the first, “Enough of that, my good friend. Don’t lay a hand on the contemplative. He’s an outstanding contemplative, of great power & great might.”

Then the first yakkha, ignoring the second yakkha, gave Ven. Sāriputta a blow on the head. And with that blow he might have knocked over an elephant seven or eight cubits tall, or split a great rocky crag. But right there the yakkha–yelling, “I’m burning!”–fell into the Great Hell.

Now, Ven. Moggallāna–with his divine eye, pure and surpassing the human–saw the yakkha give Ven. Sāriputta a blow on the head. Seeing this, he went to Ven. Sāriputta and, on arrival, said to him, “I hope you are well, friend Sāriputta. I hope you are comfortable. I hope you are feeling no pain.”

“I am well, friend Moggallāna. I am comfortable. But I do have a slight headache.”

“How amazing, friend Sāriputta! How astounding! How great your power & might! Just now a yakkha gave you a blow on the head. So great was that blow that he might have knocked over an elephant seven or eight cubits tall, or split a great rocky crag. But all you say is this: ‘I am well, friend Moggallāna. I am comfortable. But I do have a slight headache’!”

“How amazing, friend Moggallāna! How astounding! How great your power & might! Where you saw a yakkha just now, I didn’t even see a dust devil!”

The Blessed One–with the divine ear-property, pure and surpassing the human–heard those two great beings conversing in this way. Then, on realizing the significance of that, the Blessed One on that occasion exclaimed:

Whose mind, standing like rock,
doesn’t shake,
dispassionate for things that spark passion,
unprovoked by things that spark provocation:
When one’s mind is developed like this,
from where can there come to him
suffering & stress?


Read this translation of Udāna 4.4 Juñha Sutta. Moonlit by Bhikkhu Ṭhanissaro on DhammaTalks.org. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net, SuttaFriends.org, or Ancient-Buddhist-Texts.net. Or listen on SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

Or read a translation in Deutsch, Srpski, Español, Magyar, Bahasa Indonesia, Italiano, 日本語, မြန်မာဘာသာ, Nederlands, Norsk, Português, Русский, or සිංහල. Learn how to find your language.

Ud 3.4 Sāriputta Sutta: Sāriputta

I have heard that on one occasion the Blessed One was staying near Sāvatthī at Jeta’s Grove, Anāthapiṇḍika’s monastery. And on that occasion Ven. Sāriputta was sitting not far from the Blessed One, his legs crossed, his body held erect, having set mindfulness to the fore. The Blessed One saw Ven. Sāriputta sitting not far away, his legs crossed, his body held erect, having set mindfulness to the fore.

Then, on realizing the significance of that, the Blessed One on that occasion exclaimed:

As a mountain of rock
is unwavering, well-settled,
so a monk whose delusion is ended
doesn’t quiver–
just like a mountain.


Read this translation of Udāna 3.4 Sāriputta Sutta. Sāriputta by Bhikkhu Ṭhanissaro on DhammaTalks.org. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net, SuttaFriends.org, or Ancient-Buddhist-Texts.net. Or listen on SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

Or read a translation in Deutsch, Srpski, Español, Bahasa Indonesia, Italiano, 日本語, မြန်မာဘာသာ, Nederlands, Norsk, Português, Русский, or සිංහල. Learn how to find your language.

Ud 8.6 Pāṭaligāmiyasutta: The Layfolk of Pāṭali Village

[NOTE: The first half of this sutta is most relevant to this month’s topic, but the entire sutta is included for those who have time to read.]

So I have heard. At one time the Buddha was wandering in the land of the Magadhans together with a large Saṅgha of mendicants when he arrived at the village of Pāṭali. The lay followers of Pāṭali Village heard that he had arrived. So they went to see him, bowed, sat down to one side, and said to him, “Sir, please consent to come to our guest house.” The Buddha consented with silence.

Then, knowing that the Buddha had consented, the lay followers of Pāṭali Village got up from their seat, bowed, and respectfully circled the Buddha, keeping him on their right. Then they went to the guest house, where they spread carpets all over, prepared seats, set up a water jar, and placed an oil lamp. Then they went back to the Buddha, bowed, stood to one side, and told him of their preparations, saying: “Please, sir, come at your convenience.”

In the morning, the Buddha robed up and, taking his bowl and robe, went to the guest house together with the Saṅgha of mendicants. Having washed his feet he entered the guest house and sat against the central column facing east. The Saṅgha of mendicants also washed their feet, entered the guest house, and sat against the west wall facing east, with the Buddha right in front of them. The lay followers of Pāṭali Village also washed their feet, entered the guest house, and sat against the east wall facing west, with the Buddha right in front of them. Then the Buddha addressed them:

“Householders, there are these five drawbacks for an unethical person because of their failure in ethics. What five? Firstly, an unethical person loses substantial wealth on account of negligence. This is the first drawback.

Furthermore, an unethical person gets a bad reputation. This is the second drawback.

Furthermore, an unethical person enters any kind of assembly timid and embarrassed, whether it’s an assembly of aristocrats, brahmins, householders, or ascetics. This is the third drawback.

Furthermore, an unethical person feels lost when they die. This is the fourth drawback.

Furthermore, an unethical person, when their body breaks up, after death, is reborn in a place of loss, a bad place, the underworld, hell. This is the fifth drawback. These are the five drawbacks for an unethical person because of their failure in ethics.

There are these five benefits for an ethical person because of their accomplishment in ethics. What five? Firstly, an ethical person gains substantial wealth on account of diligence. This is the first benefit.

Furthermore, an ethical person gets a good reputation. This is the second benefit.

Furthermore, an ethical person enters any kind of assembly bold and self-assured, whether it’s an assembly of aristocrats, brahmins, householders, or ascetics. This is the third benefit.

Furthermore, an ethical person dies not feeling lost. This is the fourth benefit.

Furthermore, when an ethical person’s body breaks up, after death, they’re reborn in a good place, a heavenly realm. This is the fifth benefit. These are the five benefits for an ethical person because of their accomplishment in ethics.”

The Buddha spent much of the night educating, encouraging, firing up, and inspiring the lay followers of Pāṭali Village with a Dhamma talk. Then he dismissed them, “The night is getting late, householders. Please go at your convenience.” And then the lay followers of Pāṭali Village approved and agreed with what the Buddha said. They got up from their seat, bowed, and respectfully circled the Buddha, keeping him on their right, before leaving. Soon after they left the Buddha entered a private cubicle.

Now at that time the Magadhan ministers Sunidha and Vassakāra were building a citadel at Pāṭali Village to keep the Vajjis out. At that time thousands of deities were taking possession of building sites in Pāṭali Village. Illustrious rulers or royal ministers inclined to build houses at sites possessed by illustrious deities. Middling rulers or royal ministers inclined to build houses at sites possessed by middling deities. Lesser rulers or royal ministers inclined to build houses at sites possessed by lesser deities.

With clairvoyance that is purified and superhuman, the Buddha saw those deities taking possession of building sites in Pāṭali Village, and the people building houses in accord with the station of the deities. The Buddha rose at the crack of dawn and addressed Ānanda,

“Ānanda, who is building a citadel at Pāṭali Village?” “Sir, the Magadhan ministers Sunidha and Vassakāra are building a citadel to keep the Vajjis out.” “It’s as if they were building the citadel in consultation with the gods of the Thirty-Three. With clairvoyance that is purified and superhuman, I saw those deities taking possession of building sites. Illustrious rulers or royal ministers inclined to build houses at sites possessed by illustrious deities. Middling rulers or royal ministers inclined to build houses at sites possessed by middling deities. Lesser rulers or royal ministers inclined to build houses at sites possessed by lesser deities. As far as the civilized region extends, as far as the trading zone extends, this will be the chief city: the Pāṭaliputta trade center. But Pāṭaliputta will face three threats: from fire, flood, and dissension.”

Then the Magadhan ministers Sunidha and Vassakāra approached the Buddha, and exchanged greetings with him. When the greetings and polite conversation were over, they stood to one side and said, “Would Master Gotama together with the mendicant Saṅgha please accept today’s meal from me?”

Then, knowing that the Buddha had consented, they went to their own guest house, where they had delicious fresh and cooked foods prepared. Then they had the Buddha informed of the time, saying, “It’s time, Master Gotama, the meal is ready.”

Then the Buddha robed up in the morning and, taking his bowl and robe, went to their guest house together with the mendicant Saṅgha, where he sat on the seat spread out. Then Sunidha and Vassakāra served and satisfied the mendicant Saṅgha headed by the Buddha with their own hands with delicious fresh and cooked foods.

When the Buddha had eaten and washed his hand and bowl, Sunidha and Vassakāra took a low seat and sat to one side. The Buddha expressed his appreciation with these verses:

“In the place he makes his dwelling,
having fed the astute
and the virtuous here,
the restrained spiritual practitioners,

he should dedicate an offering
to the deities there.
Venerated, they venerate him;
honored, they honor him.

After that they have compassion for him,
like a mother for the child at her breast.
A man beloved of the deities
always sees nice things.”

When the Buddha had expressed his appreciation to Sunidha and Vassakāra with these verses, he got up from his seat and left.

Sunidha and Vassakāra followed behind the Buddha, thinking, “The gate through which the ascetic Gotama departs today shall be named the Gotama Gate. The ford at which he crosses the Ganges River shall be named the Gotama Ford.”

Then the gate through which the Buddha departed was named the Gotama Gate. Then the Buddha came to the Ganges River. Now at that time the Ganges was full to the brim so a crow could drink from it. Wanting to cross from the near to the far shore, some people were seeking a boat, some a dinghy, while some were tying up a raft. But, as easily as a strong person would extend or contract their arm, the Buddha, together with the mendicant Saṅgha, vanished from the near shore and landed on the far shore.

He saw all those people wanting to cross over.

Then, understanding this matter, on that occasion the Buddha expressed this heartfelt sentiment:

“Those who cross a deluge or stream
have built a bridge and left the marshes behind.
While some people are still tying a raft,
intelligent people have crossed over.”



Read this translation of Udāna 8.6 Pāṭaligāmiyasutta: The Layfolk of Pāṭali Village by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or read a different translation on DhammaTalks.org or Ancient-Buddhist-Texts.net. Or listen on SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

Or read a translation in Deutsch, Srpski, Español, Bahasa Indonesia, Italiano, 日本語, မြန်မာဘာသာ, Nederlands, Norsk, Português, Русский, or සිංහල. Learn how to find your language.

Ud 4.1 Meghiyasutta: With Meghiya

So I have heard. At one time the Buddha was staying near Cālikā, on the Cālikā mountain. Now, at that time Venerable Meghiya was the Buddha’s attendant. Then Venerable Meghiya went up to the Buddha, bowed, stood to one side, and said to him, “Sir, I’d like to enter Jantu village for alms.” “Please, Meghiya, go at your convenience.”

Then Meghiya robed up in the morning and, taking his bowl and robe, entered Jantu village for alms. After the meal, on his return from almsround in Jantu village, he went to the shore of Kimikālā river. As he was going for a walk along the shore of the river he saw a lovely and delightful mango grove. When he saw this he thought, “Oh, this mango grove is lovely and delightful! This is good enough for striving for a gentleman wanting to strive. If the Buddha allows me, I’ll come back to this mango grove to meditate.”

Then Venerable Meghiya went up to the Buddha, bowed, sat down to one side, and told him what had happened, adding,

“If the Buddha allows me, I’ll go back to that mango grove to meditate.”

When he had spoken, the Buddha said to him, “We’re alone, Meghiya. Wait until another mendicant comes.”

For a second time Meghiya said to the Buddha, “Sir, the Buddha has nothing more to do, and nothing that needs improvement. But I have. If you allow me, I’ll go back to that mango grove to meditate.” For a second time the Buddha said, “We’re alone, Meghiya. Wait until another mendicant comes.”

For a third time Meghiya said to the Buddha, “Sir, the Buddha has nothing more to do, and nothing that needs improvement. But I have. If you allow me, I’ll go back to that mango grove to meditate.” “Meghiya, since you speak of meditation, what can I say? Please, Meghiya, go at your convenience.”

Then Meghiya got up from his seat, bowed, and respectfully circled the Buddha, keeping him on his right. Then he went to that mango grove, and, having plunged deep into it, sat at the root of a certain tree for the day’s meditation. But while Meghiya was meditating in that mango grove he was beset mostly by three kinds of bad, unskillful thoughts, namely, sensual, malicious, and cruel thoughts.

Then he thought, “Oh, how incredible, how amazing! I’ve gone forth from the lay life to homelessness out of faith, but I’m still harassed by these three kinds of bad, unskillful thoughts: sensual, malicious, and cruel thoughts.”

Then in the late afternoon, Venerable Meghiya came out of retreat and went to the Buddha. He bowed, sat down to one side, and told the Buddha what had happened.

“Meghiya, when the heart’s release is not ripe, five things help it ripen. What five?

Firstly, a mendicant has good friends, companions, and associates. This is the first thing …

Furthermore, a mendicant is ethical, restrained in the monastic code, conducting themselves well and seeking alms in suitable places. Seeing danger in the slightest fault, they keep the rules they’ve undertaken. This is the second thing …

Furthermore, a mendicant gets to take part in talk about self-effacement that helps open the heart and leads solely to disillusionment, dispassion, cessation, peace, insight, awakening, and extinguishment when they want, without trouble or difficulty. That is, talk about fewness of wishes, contentment, seclusion, aloofness, arousing energy, ethics, immersion, wisdom, freedom, and the knowledge and vision of freedom.’ This is the third thing …

Furthermore, a mendicant lives with energy roused up for giving up unskillful qualities and embracing skillful qualities. They are strong, staunchly vigorous, not slacking off when it comes to developing skillful qualities. This is the fourth thing …

Furthermore, a mendicant is wise. They have the wisdom of arising and passing away which is noble, penetrative, and leads to the complete ending of suffering. This is the fifth thing that, when the heart’s release is not ripe, helps it ripen. These are the five things that, when the heart’s release is not ripe, help it ripen.

A mendicant with good friends, companions, and associates can expect to be ethical …

A mendicant with good friends, companions, and associates can expect to take part in talk about self-effacement that helps open the heart …

A mendicant with good friends, companions, and associates can expect to be energetic …

A mendicant with good friends, companions, and associates can expect to be wise …

But then, a mendicant grounded on these five things should develop four further things. They should develop the perception of ugliness to give up greed, love to give up hate, mindfulness of breathing to cut off thinking, and perception of impermanence to uproot the conceit ‘I am’. When you perceive impermanence, the perception of not-self becomes stabilized. Perceiving not-self, you uproot the conceit ‘I am’ and attain extinguishment in this very life.”

Then, understanding this matter, on that occasion the Buddha expressed this heartfelt sentiment:

“Lesser thoughts and subtle thoughts
arise, springing up in the mind.
Not understanding these thoughts,
one with mind astray runs all over the place.

Having understood these thoughts
that arise, springing up in the mind,
an awakened one—keen, restrained, and mindful—
has given them up without remainder.”



Read this translation of Udāna 4.1 Meghiyasutta: With Meghiya by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or read a different translation on SuttaFriends.org, DhammaTalks.org, Ancient-Buddhist-Texts.net or AccessToInsight.org. Or listen on SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

Or read a translation in Deutsch, Español, Indonesian, Italiano, 日本語, မြန်မာဘာသာ, Nederlands, Norsk, Português, Русский, සිංහල, or Srpski. Learn how to find your language.

Ud 3.5 Mahāmoggallānasutta: With Mahāmoggallāna

So I have heard. At one time the Buddha was staying near Sāvatthī in Jeta’s Grove, Anāthapiṇḍika’s monastery. Now at that time Venerable Mahāmoggallāna was sitting not far from the Buddha, cross-legged, with his body straight and mindfulness of the body well-established in himself. The Buddha saw him meditating there.

Then, understanding this matter, on that occasion the Buddha expressed this heartfelt sentiment:

“With mindfulness of the body established,
restrained in the six fields of contact,
a mendicant always immersed in samādhi
would know quenching in themselves.”


Read this translation of Udāna 3.5 Mahāmoggallānasutta: With Mahāmoggallāna by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or read a different translation on SuttaFriends.org, DhammaTalks.org or Ancient-Buddhist-Texts.net. Or listen on SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

Or read a translation in Deutsch, Español, Indonesian, Italiano, 日本語, မြန်မာဘာသာ, Nederlands, Norsk, Português, Русский, සිංහල, or Srpski. Learn how to find your language.

Ud 2.10 Bhaddiyasutta: With Bhaddiya

So I have heard. At one time the Buddha was staying near Anupiya in a mango grove. Now at that time, Venerable Bhaddiya son of Kāḷīgodhā, even in the wilderness, at the foot of a tree, or in an empty dwelling, frequently expressed this heartfelt sentiment: “Oh, what bliss! Oh, what bliss!”

Several mendicants heard him and thought, “Without a doubt, Venerable Bhaddiya leads the spiritual life dissatisfied. It’s when recalling the pleasures of royalty he formerly enjoyed as a lay person that, even in the wilderness, at the foot of a tree, or in an empty dwelling, he frequently expresses this heartfelt sentiment: ‘Oh, what bliss! Oh, what bliss!’”

Then those mendicants went up to the Buddha, bowed, sat down to one side, and told him what was happening.

So the Buddha addressed a certain monk, “Please, monk, in my name tell the mendicant Bhaddiya that the teacher summons him.”

“Yes, sir,” that monk replied. He went to Bhaddiya and said to him, “Reverend Bhaddiya, the teacher summons you.” “Yes, reverend,” Bhaddiya replied. He went to the Buddha, bowed, and sat down to one side. The Buddha said to him:

“Is it really true, Bhaddiya, that even in the wilderness, at the foot of a tree, or in an empty dwelling, you frequently express this heartfelt sentiment: ‘Oh, what bliss! Oh, what bliss!’?” “Yes, sir.”

“But why do you say this?” “Formerly, as a lay person ruling the land, my guard was well organized within and without the royal compound, within and without the city, and within and without the country. But although I was guarded and defended in this way, I remained fearful, scared, suspicious, and nervous. But these days, even when alone in the wilderness, at the foot of a tree, or in an empty dwelling, I’m not fearful, scared, suspicious, or nervous. I live relaxed, unruffled, surviving on charity, my heart free as a wild deer. It is for this reason that, even in the wilderness, at the foot of a tree, or in an empty dwelling, I frequently expressed this heartfelt sentiment: ‘Oh, what bliss! Oh, what bliss!’”

Then, understanding this matter, on that occasion the Buddha expressed this heartfelt sentiment:

“They who hide no anger within,
gone beyond any kind of existence;
happy, free from fear and sorrow—
even the gods can’t see them.”


Read this translation of Udāna 2.10 Bhaddiyasutta: With Bhaddiya by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net.

Or read a different translation on SuttaFriends.org, DhammaTalks.org, Ancient-Buddhist-Texts.net or AccessToInsight.org. Or listen on SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

Or read a translation in Deutsch, Español, Français, Indonesian, Italiano, 日本語, မြန်မာဘာသာ, Nederlands, Norsk, Português, ру́сский язы́к, සිංහල, Srpski, or Svenska. Learn how to find your language.

Ud 2.5 Upāsakasutta: A Lay Follower

So I have heard. At one time the Buddha was staying near Sāvatthī in Jeta’s Grove, Anāthapiṇḍika’s monastery. Now at that time a certain lay follower from Icchānaṅgalaka arrived at Sāvatthī on some business. Having concluded his business in Sāvatthī he went to see the Buddha, bowed, and sat down to one side. The Buddha said this to him: “It’s been a long time, lay follower, since you took the opportunity to come here.”

“For a long time I’ve wanted to come and see the Buddha, but I wasn’t able, being prevented by my many duties and responsibilities.”

Then, understanding this matter, on that occasion the Buddha expressed this heartfelt sentiment:

“One who has nothing is happy indeed,
a learned person who has assessed the teaching.
See how troubled are those with attachments,
a person bound tight to people.”


Read this translation of Udāna 2.5 Upāsakasutta: A Lay Follower by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net.

Or read a different translation on SuttaFriends.org, DhammaTalks.org or Ancient-Buddhist-Texts.net. Or listen on SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

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Ud 7.4 Kāmesu Satta Sutta: Attached to Sensual Pleasures (2)

I have heard that on one occasion the Blessed One was staying near Sāvatthī at Jeta’s Grove, Anāthapiṇḍika’s monastery. And on that occasion, most of the people in Sāvatthī were excessively attached to sensual pleasures. They lived infatuated with, greedy for, addicted to, fastened to, absorbed in sensual pleasures. Then early in the morning the Blessed One adjusted his under robe and–carrying his bowl & robes–went into Sāvatthī for alms. He saw that most of the people in Sāvatthī were excessively attached to sensual pleasures, that they live infatuated with, greedy for, addicted to, fastened to, absorbed in sensual pleasures.

Then, on realizing the significance of that, the Blessed One on that occasion exclaimed:

Blinded by sensuality
covered by the net,
veiled with the veil of craving,
bound by the Kinsman of the heedless,
like fish in the mouth of a trap,
they go to aging & death,
like a milk-drinking calf to its mother.


Read this translation of Ud 7.4 Kāmesu Satta Sutta: Attached to Sensual Pleasures (2) by Thanissaro Bhikkhu on Dhammatalks.org.

Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net, or Ancient-Buddhist-Texts.net. Or listen on SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

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Ud 1.4 Huṁhuṅkasutta: Whiny

So I have heard. At one time, when he was first awakened, the Buddha was staying near Uruvelā at the goatherd’s banyan tree on the bank of the Nerañjarā River. There the Buddha sat cross-legged for seven days without moving, experiencing the bliss of freedom. When seven days had passed, the Buddha emerged from that state of immersion.

Then a certain brahmin of the whiny sort went up to the Buddha and exchanged greetings with him. When the greetings and polite conversation were over, he stood to one side, and said, “Master Gotama, how do you define a brahmin? And what are the things that make one a brahmin?”

Then, understanding this matter, on that occasion the Buddha expressed this heartfelt sentiment:

“A brahmin who has banished bad qualities—
not whiny, not stained, but self-controlled,
a complete knowledge master
   who has completed the spiritual journey—
may rightly proclaim the brahmin doctrine,
not proud of anything in the world.”


Read this translation of Udāna 1.4 Huṁhuṅkasutta: Whiny by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or read a different translation on SuttaFriends.org, DhammaTalks.org or Ancient-Buddhist-Texts.net. Or listen on SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

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Ud 7.9 Udapāna Sutta: The Well

I have heard that on one occasion the Blessed One was wandering among the Mallans, together with a large community of monks, and came to a brahman village of the Mallans named Thūna. The brahman householders of Thūna heard that “Gotama the Sakyan contemplative, gone forth from the Sakyan clan, is wandering among the Mallans together with a large community of monks, and has arrived at Thūna.” So they filled the well all the way to the brim with grass & chaff, [thinking], “Don’t let these shaven-headed contemplatives draw drinking water.”

Then the Blessed One, going down from the road, went to a certain tree, and on arrival sat down on a seat laid out. Seated, he said to Ven. Ānanda: “Please, Ānanda, fetch me some drinking water from that well.”

When this was said, Ven. Ānanda replied, “Just now, lord, the brahman householders of Thūna filled that well all the way to the brim with grass & chaff, [thinking], ‘Don’t let these shaven-headed contemplatives draw drinking water.’”

A second time, the Blessed One said to Ven. Ānanda: “Please, Ānanda, fetch me some drinking water from that well.”

A second time, Ven. Ānanda replied, “Just now, lord, the brahman householders of Thūna filled that well all the way to the brim with grass & chaff, [thinking], ‘Don’t let these shaven-headed contemplatives draw drinking water.’”

A third time, the Blessed One said to Ven. Ānanda: “Please, Ānanda, fetch me some drinking water from that well.”

Responding, “As you say, lord,” to the Blessed One, Ven. Ānanda–taking a bowl–went to the well. As he was approaching the well, it expelled all the grass & chaff from its mouth and stood filled to the brim–streaming, as it were–with pristine water, undisturbed & clear. The thought occurred to him, “How amazing! How astounding!–the great power & great might of the Tathāgata!–in that, while I was approaching the well, it expelled all the grass & chaff from its mouth and stood filled to the brim–streaming, as it were–with pristine water, undisturbed & clear.”

Taking drinking water in his bowl, he went to the Blessed One and on arrival said, “How amazing, lord! How astounding!–the great power & great might of the Tathāgata!–in that, while I was approaching the well, it expelled all the grass & chaff from its mouth and stood filled to the brim–streaming, as it were–with pristine water, undisturbed & clear. Drink the water, O Blessed One! Drink the water, O One-Well-Gone!”

Then, on realizing the significance of that, the Blessed One on that occasion exclaimed:

What need for a well
if there were waters always?
Having cut craving
     by the root,
one would go about searching
     for what?


Read this translation of Udāna 7.9 Udapāna Sutta. The Well by Bhikkhu Ṭhanissaro on DhammaTalks.org.

Ud 6.1 Āyusaṅkhārossajjanasutta: Surrendering the Life Force

So I have heard. At one time the Buddha was staying near Vesālī, at the Great Wood, in the hall with the peaked roof. Then the Buddha robed up in the morning and, taking his bowl and robe, entered Vesālī for alms. Then, after the meal, on his return from almsround, he addressed Venerable Ānanda: “Ānanda, get your sitting cloth. Let’s go to the Cāpāla shrine for the day’s meditation.”

“Yes, sir,” replied Ānanda. Taking his sitting cloth he followed behind the Buddha. Then the Buddha went up to the Cāpāla shrine, where he sat on the seat spread out. When he was seated he said to Venerable Ānanda:

“Ānanda, Vesālī is lovely. And the Udena, Gotamaka, Seven Maidens, Many Sons, Sārandada, and Cāpāla Tree-shrines are all lovely. Whoever has developed and cultivated the four bases of psychic power—made them a vehicle and a basis, kept them up, consolidated them, and properly implemented them—may, if they wish, live for the proper lifespan or what’s left of it. The Realized One has developed and cultivated the four bases of psychic power, made them a vehicle and a basis, kept them up, consolidated them, and properly implemented them. If he wished, the Realized One could live for the proper lifespan or what’s left of it.”

But Ānanda didn’t get it, even though the Buddha dropped such an obvious hint, such a clear sign. He didn’t beg the Buddha, “Sir, may the Blessed One please remain for the eon! May the Holy One please remain for the eon! That would be for the welfare and happiness of the people, out of compassion for the world, for the benefit, welfare, and happiness of gods and humans.” For his mind was as if possessed by Māra. For a second time … and for a third time, the Buddha said to Ānanda:

“Ānanda, Vesālī is lovely. And the Udena, Gotamaka, Seven Maidens, Many Sons, Sārandada, and Cāpāla Tree-shrines are all lovely. Whoever has developed and cultivated the four bases of psychic power—made them a vehicle and a basis, kept them up, consolidated them, and properly implemented them—may, if they wish, live for the proper lifespan or what’s left of it. The Realized One has developed and cultivated the four bases of psychic power, made them a vehicle and a basis, kept them up, consolidated them, and properly implemented them. If he wished, the Realized One could live for the proper lifespan or what’s left of it.”

But Ānanda didn’t get it, even though the Buddha dropped such an obvious hint, such a clear sign. He didn’t beg the Buddha, “Sir, may the Blessed One please remain for the eon! May the Holy One please remain for the eon! That would be for the welfare and happiness of the people, out of compassion for the world, for the benefit, welfare, and happiness of gods and humans.” For his mind was as if possessed by Māra.

Then the Buddha said to Venerable Ānanda, “Go now, Ānanda, at your convenience.” “Yes, sir,” replied Ānanda. He rose from his seat, bowed, and respectfully circled the Buddha, keeping him on his right, before sitting at the root of a tree close by.

And then, not long after Ānanda had left, Māra the Wicked went up to the Buddha, stood to one side, and said to him:

“May the Blessed One now become fully extinguished! May the Holy One now become fully extinguished! Now is the time for the Buddha to become fully extinguished. Sir, you once made this statement: ‘Wicked One, I will not become fully extinguished until I have monk disciples who are competent, educated, assured, learned, have memorized the teachings, and practice in line with the teachings. Not until they practice properly, living in line with the teaching. Not until they’ve learned their own tradition, and explain, teach, assert, establish, disclose, analyze, and make it clear. Not until they can legitimately and completely refute the doctrines of others that come up, and teach with a demonstrable basis.’ Today you do have such monk disciples. May the Blessed One now become fully extinguished! May the Holy One now become fully extinguished! Now is the time for the Buddha to become fully extinguished.

Sir, you once made this statement: ‘Wicked One, I will not become fully extinguished until I have nun disciples who are competent, educated, assured, learned …’ … Today you do have such nun disciples.

‘Wicked One, I will not become fully extinguished until I have layman disciples who are competent, educated, assured, learned …’ Today you do have such layman disciples.

‘Wicked One, I will not become fully extinguished until I have laywoman disciples who are competent, educated, assured, learned …’ Today you do have such laywoman disciples. May the Blessed One now become fully extinguished! May the Holy One now become fully extinguished! Now is the time for the Buddha to become fully extinguished.

Sir, you once made this statement: ‘Not until my spiritual path is successful and prosperous, extensive, popular, widespread, and well proclaimed wherever there are gods and humans.’ Today your spiritual path is successful and prosperous, extensive, popular, widespread, and well proclaimed wherever there are gods and humans. May the Blessed One now become fully extinguished! May the Holy One now become fully extinguished! Now is the time for the Buddha to become fully extinguished.

When this was said, the Buddha said to Māra, “Relax, Wicked One. The final extinguishment of the Realized One will be soon. Three months from now the Realized One will finally be extinguished.”

So at the Cāpāla Tree-shrine the Buddha, mindful and aware, surrendered the life force. When he did so there was a great earthquake, awe-inspiring and hair-raising, and thunder cracked the sky.

Then, understanding this matter, on that occasion the Buddha expressed this heartfelt sentiment:

“Comparing the incomparable with the creation of prolonged life,
the sage surrendered the life force.
Happy inside, serene,
he shattered self-creation like a suit of armor.”



Read this translation of Udāna 6.1 Āyusaṅkhārossajjanasutta: Surrendering the Life Force by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or read a different translation on DhammaTalks.org or Ancient-Buddhist-Texts.net. Or listen on SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

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Ud 2.2 Rājasutta: Kings

So I have heard. At one time the Buddha was staying near Sāvatthī in Jeta’s Grove, Anāthapiṇḍika’s monastery. Now at that time, after the meal, on return from almsround, several mendicants sat together in the assembly hall and this discussion came up among them: “Which of these two kings has greater wealth, riches, treasury, dominion, vehicles, forces, might, and power: King Seniya Bimbisāra of Māgadha or King Pasenadi of Kosala?” At that point the conversation among those mendicants was left unfinished.

Then in the late afternoon, the Buddha came out of retreat, went to the assembly hall, sat down on the seat spread out, and addressed the mendicants: “Mendicants, what were you sitting talking about just now? What conversation was left unfinished?”

So the mendicants told him what they had been talking about when the Buddha arrived. The Buddha said,

“Mendicants, it is not appropriate for you gentlemen who have gone forth in faith from the lay life to homelessness to talk about such things. When you’re sitting together you should do one of two things: discuss the teachings or keep noble silence.”

Then, understanding this matter, on that occasion the Buddha expressed this heartfelt sentiment:

“Neither the pleasures of the senses,
nor even divine happiness,
is worth even a sixteenth part
of the happiness of craving’s end.”


Read this translation of Udāna 2.2 Rājasutta: Kings by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net, SuttaFriends.org, DhammaTalks.org or Ancient-Buddhist-Texts.net. Or listen on SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

Ud 3.7 Sakkudānasutta: Sakka’s Heartfelt Saying

So I have heard. At one time the Buddha was staying near Rājagaha, in the Bamboo Grove, the squirrels’ feeding ground. Now at that time Venerable Mahākassapa was staying in the Pipphali cave. Having entered a certain state of immersion, he sat cross-legged for seven days without moving. When seven days had passed, Mahākassapa emerged from that state of immersion. It occurred to him, “Why not enter Rājagaha for almsfood?”

Now at that time five hundred deities were ready and eager for the chance to offer alms to Mahākassapa. But Mahākasspa refused those deities. In the morning, he robed up, took his bowl and robe, and entered Rājagaha for alms.

Now at that time Sakka, lord of Gods, wished to give alms to Mahākassapa. Having manifested in the appearance of a weaver, he worked the loom while the demon maiden Sujā fed the shuttle. Then, as Mahākassapa wandered indiscriminately for almsfood in Rājagaha, he approached Sakka’s house. Seeing Mahākassapa coming off in the distance, Sakka came out of his house, greeted him, and took the bowl from his hand. He re-entered the house and filled the bowl with rice from the pot. That almsfood had many tasty soups and sauces. Then it occurred to Mahākassapa, “Now, what being is this who has such psychic power?” It occurred to him, “This is Sakka, lord of Gods.” Knowing this, he said to Sakka, “This is your doing, Kosiya; don’t do such a thing again.” “But sir, Kassapa, we too need merit! We too ought make merit.”

Then Sakka bowed and respectfully circled Mahākassapa, keeping him on his right. Then he rose into the air and, sitting cross-legged in the sky, expressed this heartfelt sentiment three times: “Oh the gift, the best gift is well established in Kassapa! Oh the gift, the best gift is well established in Kassapa! Oh the gift, the best gift is well established in Kassapa!” With clairaudience that is purified and superhuman, the Buddha heard Sakka express this heartfelt sentiment while sitting in the sky.

Then, understanding this matter, on that occasion the Buddha expressed this heartfelt sentiment:

“A mendicant who relies on alms,
self-supported, providing for no other;
the poised one is envied by even the gods,
calm and ever mindful.”


Read this translation of Udāna 3.7 Sakkudānasutta: Sakka’s Heartfelt Saying Sakkudānasutta by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or read a different translation on SuttaFriends.org, DhammaTalks.org or Ancient-Buddhist-Texts.net. Or listen on SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

Ud 8.8 Visākhāsutta: With Visākhā

So I have heard. At one time the Buddha was staying near Sāvatthī in the Eastern Monastery, the stilt longhouse of Migāra’s mother. Now at that time the dear and beloved granddaughter of Visākhā Migāra’s Mother had just passed away. Then, in the middle of the day, Visākhā with wet clothes and hair went to the Buddha, bowed, and sat down. The Buddha said to her,

“So, Visākhā, where are you coming from in the middle of the day with wet clothes and hair?” “Sir, my beloved granddaughter has just passed away. That’s why I came here in the middle of the day with wet clothes and hair.” “Visākhā, would you like as many children and grandchildren as there are people in the whole of Sāvatthī?” “I would, sir.”

“But Visākhā, how many people pass away each day in Sāvatthī?” “Every day, sir, there are ten people passing away in Sāvatthī. Or else there are nine, eight, seven, six, five, four, three, two, or at least one person who passes away every day in Sāvatthī. Sāvatthī is never without someone passing away.”

“What do you think, Visākhā? Would there ever be a time when your clothes and hair were not wet?” “No, sir. Enough, sir, with so many children and grandchildren.”

“Those who have a hundred loved ones, Visākhā, have a hundred sufferings. Those who have ninety loved ones, or eighty, seventy, sixty, fifty, forty, thirty, twenty, ten, nine, eight, seven, six, five, four, three, two, or one loved one have one suffering. Those who have no loved ones have no suffering. They are free of sorrow, stains, and anguish I say.”

Then, understanding this matter, on that occasion the Buddha expressed this heartfelt sentiment:

“All the sorrows and lamentations
and the countless forms of suffering in the world
occur because of those that we love;
without loved ones they do not occur.

That’s why those who have no loved ones at all in the world
are happy and free of grief.
So aspiring to the sorrowless and stainless,
have no loved ones in the world at all.”



Read this translation of Udāna 8.8 Visākhāsutta: With Visākhā by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or read a different translation on DhammaTalks.org or Ancient-Buddhist-Texts.net. Or listen on SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

Ud 3.10 Lokavolokanasuttaṁ: The Discourse about Looking Around the World

Thus I heard: at one time the Fortunate One was dwelling near Uruvelā, on the bank of the river Nerañjarā, at the root of the Awakening tree, in the first (period) after attaining Awakening.

Then at that time the Fortunate One was sitting in one cross-legged posture for seven days experiencing the happiness of freedom.

Then with the passing of those seven days the Fortunate One, after rising from that concentration, looked around the world with his Buddha-eye. The Fortunate One looking around the world with his Buddha-eye saw beings being tormented with many torments, and being burned with many fevers, born from passion, and born from hatred, and born from delusion.

Then the Fortunate One, having understood the significance of it, on that occasion uttered this exalted utterance:

“This world, overcome by contact, is tormented,
It speaks of a disease as the self,
For with whatever it conceives
Hereafter it becomes otherwise.

Continually becoming other, the world is shackled by continuity, overcome by continuity,

It greatly rejoices in continuity,
What it rejoices in, that is fearful,
What it fears, that is suffering.

This spiritual life is lived for the complete giving up of continuity. For whatever the ascetics or brāhmaṇas say about freedom from continuity being through (further) continuity, all of them are not free from continuity, I say. Or whatever the ascetics or brāhmaṇas say about the escape from continuity being through discontinuity, all of them have not escaped from continuity, I say.

Conditioned by cleaving this suffering originates, through the destruction of all attachment there is no origination of suffering. See this world overcome by many kinds of ignorance beings, who delight in beings, are not free from continuity. Whatever continuities (in existence) there are, everywhere, in every respect, all those continuities are impermanent, suffering, changeable things.

Seeing it like this, as it really is, with right wisdom,
Craving for continuity is given up, and he does not rejoice in discontinuity.

From the complete destruction of craving there is a fading away (of ignorance) without remainder, cessation, and Emancipation.

For that monk who is emancipated,
Without attachment, there is no continuity in existence.
He has vanquished Māra, is victorious in battle,
He is such a one who has overcome all continuations (in existence).”


Read this translation of Ud 3.10 Lokavolokanasuttaṁ: The Discourse about Looking Around the World by Bhikkhu Ānandajoti on DhammaTalks.org, or Ancient-Buddhist-Texts.net. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net or SuttaFriends.org.

Ud 2.3 Danda Sutta: Children with Sticks

This is as I heard from the Blessed One. At one time the Blessed One was staying in the province of Sāvatthī, in Jeta’s park, at Anathapindika’s monastery. 

One day, on a road between the city of Sāvatthī and Jeta’s park, a group of boys were hitting a snake with a stick. Then early in the morning the Blessed One, having worn his robe, taken his bowl and his double robe, entered the village to collect almsfood.  He saw the group of boys on the road hitting the snake with a stick. 

Then, on realizing the true way to happiness in the world, the Blessed One spoke the following inspired verses: 

Desiring his own happiness,
whoever harms another being
who also desires happiness,
will not obtain happiness after death.

Desiring his own happiness,
if somebody does not harm other beings
who also desire happiness,
will obtain happiness after death.


Read this translation of Udāna 2.3 Danda Sutta: Children with Sticks by Ven. Kiribathgoda Gnanananda Thero on ReadingFaithfully.org. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net, DhammaTalks.org, or Ancient-Buddhist-Texts.net.