ReadingFaithfully.org icon Facebook icon Reddit icon Tumblr icon Mastodon icon RSS icon

SN 7.10 Bahudhītarasutta: Many Daughters

At one time the Buddha was staying in the land of the Kosalans in a certain forest grove.

Now at that time one of the brahmins of the Bhāradvāja clan had lost fourteen oxen. While looking for them he went to that forest, where he saw the Buddha sitting down cross-legged, his body set straight, and mindfulness established in front of him. He went up to the Buddha, and recited these verses in the Buddha’s presence:

“This ascetic mustn’t have
fourteen oxen
missing for the past six days:
that’s why this ascetic is happy.

This ascetic mustn’t have
a field of sesame ruined,
with just one or two leaves:
that’s why this ascetic is happy.

This ascetic mustn’t have
rats in a vacant barn
dancing merrily:
that’s why this ascetic is happy.

This ascetic mustn’t have
carpets that for seven months
have been infested with fleas:
that’s why this ascetic is happy.

This ascetic mustn’t have
seven widowed daughters
with one or two children each:
that’s why this ascetic is happy.

This ascetic mustn’t have
a wife with sallow, blotchy skin
to wake him with a kick:
that’s why this ascetic is happy.

This ascetic mustn’t have
creditors knocking at dawn,
warning, ‘Pay up! Pay up!’:
that’s why this ascetic is happy.”

“You’re right, brahmin, I don’t have
fourteen oxen
missing for the past six days:
that’s why I’m happy, brahmin.

You’re right, brahmin, I don’t have
a field of sesame ruined,
with just one or two leaves:
that’s why I’m happy, brahmin.

You’re right, brahmin, I don’t have
rats in a vacant barn
dancing merrily:
that’s why I’m happy, brahmin.

You’re right, brahmin, I don’t have
carpets that for seven months
have been infested with fleas:
that’s why I’m happy, brahmin.

You’re right, brahmin, I don’t have
seven widowed daughters
with one or two children each:
that’s why I’m happy, brahmin.

You’re right, brahmin, I don’t have
a wife with blotchy, pockmarked skin
to wake me up with a kick:
that’s why I’m happy, brahmin.

You’re right, brahmin, I don’t have
creditors knocking at dawn,
warning, ‘Pay up! Pay up!’:
that’s why I’m happy, brahmin.”

When he had spoken, the brahmin said to the Buddha, “Excellent, Master Gotama! Excellent! … As if he were righting the overturned, or revealing the hidden, or pointing out the path to the lost, or lighting a lamp in the dark so people with clear eyes can see what’s there, Master Gotama has made the teaching clear in many ways. I go for refuge to Master Gotama, to the teaching, and to the mendicant Saṅgha. May I receive the going forth, the ordination in the ascetic Gotama’s presence?”

And the brahmin received the going forth, the ordination in the Buddha’s presence. Not long after his ordination, Venerable Bhāradvāja, living alone, withdrawn, diligent, keen, and resolute, soon realized the supreme end of the spiritual path in this very life. He lived having achieved with his own insight the goal for which gentlemen rightly go forth from the lay life to homelessness.

He understood: “Rebirth is ended; the spiritual journey has been completed; what had to be done has been done; there is no return to any state of existence.” And Venerable Bhāradvāja became one of the perfected.


Read this translation of Saṁyutta Nikāya 7.10 Bahudhītarasutta: Many Daughters by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net.

Or read a different translation on SuttaFriends.org. Or listen on PaliAudio.com or SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

Or read a translation in Deutsch, Bengali, Català, Español, Indonesian, မြန်မာဘာသာ, Norsk, ру́сский язы́к, සිංහල, ไทย, Tiếng Việt, or 汉语. Learn how to find your language.

SN 7.19 Mātuposakasutta: The Brahmin Who Provided for His Mother

At Sāvatthī.

Then a brahmin who provided for his mother went up to the Buddha, and exchanged greetings with him.

When the greetings and polite conversation were over, he sat down to one side and said to the Buddha, “Master Gotama, I seek alms by legitimate means, which I use to provide for my mother and father. In doing so, am I doing my duty?”

“Indeed, brahmin, in so doing you are doing your duty. Whoever seeks alms by legitimate means, and uses them to provide for their mother and father makes much merit.

A mortal provides for their mother
and father by legitimate means;
because they look after
their parents like this,
they’re praised in this life by the astute,
and they depart to rejoice in heaven.”

When he said this, the brahmin who provided for his mother said to the Buddha, “Excellent, Master Gotama! Excellent! … From this day forth, may Master Gotama remember me as a lay follower who has gone for refuge for life.”


Read this translation of Saṁyutta Nikāya 7.19 Mātuposakasutta: The Brahmin Who Provided for His Mother by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net.

Or read a different translation on SuttaFriends.org. Or listen on PaliAudio.com or SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

Or read a translation in Deutsch, Bengali, Català, Español, Indonesian, မြန်မာဘာသာ, Norsk, ру́сский язы́к, සිංහල, ไทย, Tiếng Việt, or 汉语. Learn how to find your language.

Ud 2.5 Upāsakasutta: A Lay Follower

So I have heard. At one time the Buddha was staying near Sāvatthī in Jeta’s Grove, Anāthapiṇḍika’s monastery. Now at that time a certain lay follower from Icchānaṅgalaka arrived at Sāvatthī on some business. Having concluded his business in Sāvatthī he went to see the Buddha, bowed, and sat down to one side. The Buddha said this to him: “It’s been a long time, lay follower, since you took the opportunity to come here.”

“For a long time I’ve wanted to come and see the Buddha, but I wasn’t able, being prevented by my many duties and responsibilities.”

Then, understanding this matter, on that occasion the Buddha expressed this heartfelt sentiment:

“One who has nothing is happy indeed,
a learned person who has assessed the teaching.
See how troubled are those with attachments,
a person bound tight to people.”


Read this translation of Udāna 2.5 Upāsakasutta: A Lay Follower by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net.

Or read a different translation on SuttaFriends.org, DhammaTalks.org or Ancient-Buddhist-Texts.net. Or listen on SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

Or read a translation in Deutsch, Español, Indonesian, Italiano, 日本語, မြန်မာဘာသာ, Nederlands, Norsk, Português, ру́сский язы́к, සිංහල, or Srpski. Learn how to find your language.

AN 5.176 Pīti Sutta: Rapture

Then Anāthapiṇḍika the householder, surrounded by about 500 lay followers, went to the Blessed One and, on arrival, having bowed down to him, sat to one side. As he was sitting there the Blessed One said to him, “Householder, you have provided the Saṅgha of monks with robes, alms food, lodgings, & medicinal requisites for the sick, but you shouldn’t rest content with the thought, ‘We have provided the Saṅgha of monks with robes, alms food, lodgings, & medicinal requisites for the sick.’ So you should train yourself, ‘Let’s periodically enter & remain in seclusion & rapture.’ That’s how you should train yourself.”

When this was said, Ven. Sāriputta said to the Blessed One, “It’s amazing, lord. It’s astounding, how well put that was by the Blessed One: ‘Householder, you have provided the Saṅgha of monks with robes, alms food, lodgings, & medicinal requisites for the sick, but you shouldn’t rest content with the thought, “We have provided the Saṅgha of monks with robes, alms food, lodgings, & medicinal requisites for the sick.” So you should train yourself, “Let’s periodically enter & remain in seclusion & rapture.” That’s how you should train yourself.’

“Lord, when a disciple of the noble ones enters & remains in seclusion & rapture, there are five possibilities that do not exist at that time: The pain & distress dependent on sensuality do not exist at that time. The pleasure & joy dependent on sensuality do not exist at that time. The pain & distress dependent on what is unskillful do not exist at that time. The pleasure & joy dependent on what is unskillful do not exist at that time. The pain & distress dependent on what is skillful do not exist at that time. When a disciple of the noble ones enters & remains in seclusion & rapture, these five possibilities do not exist at that time.”

(The Blessed One said:) “Excellent, Sāriputta. Excellent. When a disciple of the noble ones enters & remains in seclusion & rapture, there are five possibilities that do not exist at that time: The pain & distress dependent on sensuality do not exist at that time. The pleasure & joy dependent on sensuality do not exist at that time. The pain & distress dependent on what is unskillful do not exist at that time. The pleasure & joy dependent on what is unskillful do not exist at that time. The pain & distress dependent on what is skillful do not exist at that time. When a disciple of the noble ones enters & remains in seclusion & rapture, these five possibilities do not exist at that time.”


Read this translation of Aṅguttara Nikāya 5.176 Pīti Sutta. Rapture by Bhikkhu Ṭhanissaro on DhammaTalks.org. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net. Or listen on SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

Or read a translation in Deutsch, Bengali, Français, Indonesian, မြန်မာဘာသာ, Português, ру́сский язы́к, සිංහල, ไทย, Tiếng Việt, or 汉语. Learn how to find your language.

AN 8.25 Mahānāmasutta: Mahānāma

On one occasion the Blessed One was dwelling among the Sakyans at Kapilavatthu in the Banyan Tree Park. Then Mahānāma the Sakyan approached the Blessed One, paid homage to him, sat down to one side, and said to him:

“In what way, Bhante, is one a lay follower?”

“When, Mahānāma, one has gone for refuge to the Buddha, the Dhamma, and the Saṅgha, in that way one is a lay follower.”

“In what way, Bhante, is a lay follower virtuous?”

“When, Mahānāma, a lay follower abstains from the destruction of life, from taking what is not given, from sexual misconduct, from false speech, and from liquor, wine, and intoxicants, the basis for heedlessness, in that way a lay follower is virtuous.”

“In what way, Bhante, is a lay follower practicing for his own welfare but not for the welfare of others?”

  1. “When, Mahānāma, a lay follower is himself accomplished in faith but does not encourage others to accomplish faith;
  2. when he is himself accomplished in virtuous behavior but does not encourage others to accomplish virtuous behavior;
  3. when he is himself accomplished in generosity but does not encourage others to accomplish generosity;
  4. when he himself wants to see bhikkhus but does not encourage others to see bhikkhus;
  5. when he himself wants to hear the good Dhamma but does not encourage others to hear the good Dhamma;
  6. when he himself retains in mind the teachings he has heard but does not encourage others to retain the teachings in mind;
  7. when he himself examines the meaning of the teachings that have been retained in mind but does not encourage others to examine their meaning;
  8. when he himself has understood the meaning and the Dhamma and practices in accordance with the Dhamma, but does not encourage others to do so: it is in this way, Mahānāma, that a lay follower is practicing for his own welfare but not for the welfare of others.

“In what way, Bhante, is a lay follower practicing for his own welfare and for the welfare of others?”

  1. “When, Mahānāma, a lay follower is himself accomplished in faith and also encourages others to accomplish faith;
  2. when he is himself accomplished in virtuous behavior and also encourages others to accomplish virtuous behavior;
  3. when he is himself accomplished in generosity and also encourages others to accomplish generosity;
  4. when he himself wants to see bhikkhus and also encourages others to see bhikkhus;
  5. when he himself wants to hear the good Dhamma and also encourages others to hear the good Dhamma;
  6. when he himself retains in mind the teachings he has heard and also encourages others to retain the teachings in mind;
  7. when he himself examines the meaning of the teachings that have been retained in mind and also encourages others to examine their meaning;
  8. when he himself understands the meaning and the Dhamma and then practices in accordance with the Dhamma, and also encourages others to practice in accordance with the Dhamma: it is in this way, Mahānāma, that a lay follower is practicing for his own welfare and also for the welfare of others.”

Read this translation of Aṅguttara Nikāya 8.25 Mahānāmasutta: Mahānāma by Bhikkhu Bodhi on SuttaCentral.net. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net or AccessToInsight.org. Or listen on SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

AN 9.17 Kulasutta: Families

“Mendicants, visiting a family with nine factors is not worthwhile, or if you’ve already arrived, sitting down is not worthwhile. What nine?

  1. They don’t politely rise,
  2. bow, or
  3. offer a seat.
  4. They hide what they have.
  5. Even when they have much they give little.
  6. Even when they have refined things they give coarse things.
  7. They give carelessly, not carefully.
  8. They don’t sit nearby to listen to the teachings.
  9. When you’re speaking, they don’t listen well.

Visiting a family with these nine factors is not worthwhile, or if you’ve already arrived, sitting down is not worthwhile.

Visiting a family with nine factors is worthwhile, or if you’ve already arrived, sitting down is worthwhile. What nine?

  1. They politely rise,
  2. bow, and
  3. offer a seat.
  4. They don’t hide what they have.
  5. When they have much they give much.
  6. When they have refined things they give refined things.
  7. They give carefully, not carelessly.
  8. They sit nearby to listen to the teachings.
  9. When you’re speaking, they listen well.

Visiting a family with these nine factors is worthwhile, or if you’ve already arrived, sitting down is worthwhile.”


Read this translation of Aṅguttara Nikāya 9.17 Kulasutta: Families by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net. Or listen on SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.