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AN 5.53 Padhāniyaṅgasutta: Factors

“Bhikkhus, there are these five factors that assist striving. What five?

(1) “Here, a bhikkhu is endowed with faith. He places faith in the enlightenment of the Tathāgata thus: ‘The Blessed One is an arahant, perfectly enlightened, accomplished in true knowledge and conduct, fortunate, knower of the world, unsurpassed trainer of persons to be tamed, teacher of devas and humans, the Enlightened One, the Blessed One.’

(2) “He is seldom ill or afflicted, possessing an even digestion that is neither too cool nor too hot but moderate and suitable for striving.

(3) “He is honest and open, one who reveals himself as he really is to the Teacher and his wise fellow monks.

(4) “He has aroused energy for abandoning unwholesome qualities and acquiring wholesome qualities; he is strong, firm in exertion, not casting off the duty of cultivating wholesome qualities.

(5) “He is wise; he possesses the wisdom that discerns arising and passing away, which is noble and penetrative and leads to the complete destruction of suffering.

“These, bhikkhus, are the five factors that assist striving.”


Read this translation of Aṅguttara Nikāya 5.53 Padhāniyaṅgasutta: Factors by Bhikkhu Bodhi on SuttaCentral.net. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net or DhammaTalks.org. Or listen on SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

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AN 6.78 Sukhasomanassasutta: Joy and Happiness

“Mendicants, when a mendicant has six things they’re full of joy and happiness in the present life, and they have laid the groundwork for ending the defilements. What six? It’s when a mendicant enjoys

  • the teaching,
  • meditation,
  • giving up,
  • seclusion,
  • kindness,
  • and non-proliferation.

When a mendicant has these six things they’re full of joy and happiness in the present life, and they have laid the groundwork for ending the defilements.”


Read this translation of Aṅguttara Nikāya 6.78 Sukhasomanassasutta: Joy and Happiness by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or read a different translation on DhammaTalks.org. Or listen on SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

Or read a translation in Deutsch, Bengali, Español, Indonesian, 日本語, မြန်မာဘာသာ, Português, ру́сский язы́к, සිංහල, ไทย, Tiếng Việt, or 汉语. Learn how to find your language.

Iti 60 Puññakiriyavatthusutta: Grounds for Making Merit

This was said by the Buddha, the Perfected One: that is what I heard.

“Mendicants, there are these three grounds for making merit. What three? Giving, ethical conduct, and meditation are all grounds for making merit. These are the three grounds for making merit.”

The Buddha spoke this matter. On this it is said:

“One should practice only good deeds,
whose happy outcome stretches ahead.
Giving and moral conduct,
developing a mind of love:

having developed these
three things yielding happiness,
that astute one is reborn
in a happy, pleasing world.”

This too is a matter that was spoken by the Blessed One: that is what I heard.


Read this translation of Itivuttaka 60 Puññakiriyavatthusutta: Grounds for Making Merit by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net, SuttaFriends.org or DhammaTalks.org. Or listen on SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

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MN 128 From… Upakkilesasutta: Corruptions

[This is a small part of a longer sutta where the Buddha explains his experience with meditation before his enlightenment.]

…While meditating … ‘Excessive energy arose in me, and because of that my immersion fell away. When immersion falls away, the light and vision of forms vanish. Suppose a person was to grip a quail too tightly in their hands—it would die right there. I’ll make sure that neither doubt nor loss of focus nor dullness and drowsiness nor terror nor excitement nor discomfort nor excessive energy will arise in me again.’

While meditating … ‘Overly lax energy arose in me, and because of that my immersion fell away. When immersion falls away, the light and vision of forms vanish. Suppose a person was to grip a quail too loosely—it would fly out of their hands. I’ll make sure that neither doubt nor loss of focus nor dullness and drowsiness nor terror nor excitement nor discomfort nor excessive energy nor overly lax energy will arise in me again.’…


Read the entire translation of Majjhima Nikāya 128 Upakkilesasutta: Corruptions by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or read a different translation on DhammaTalks.org. Or listen on PaliAudio.com or SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

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Dhp 111 From… Sahassa Vagga: The Thousands

111. Better it is to live one day wise and meditative than to live a hundred years without wisdom and stillness of mind.


Read the entire translation of Dhammapada 8 Sahassa Vagga: The Thousands (100-115) by Ven. Kiribathgoda Gnananda Thero on SuttaFriends.org. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net, DhammaTalks.org, Ancient-Buddhist-Texts.net or AccessToInsight.org. Or listen on SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

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Dhp 282 from… Maggavagga: The Path

Wisdom springs from meditation; without meditation wisdom wanes. Having known these two paths of progress and decline, let a man so conduct himself that his wisdom may increase.


Read the complete translation of Dhammapada chapter 20 Maggavagga: the Path by Ven. Acharya Buddharakkhita on AccessToInsight.org. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net, SuttaFriends.org, DhammaTalks.org, or Ancient-Buddhist-Texts.net. Or listen on SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

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AN 11.13 Nandiyasutta: With Nandiya

At one time the Buddha was staying in the land of the Sakyans, near Kapilavatthu in the Banyan Tree Monastery.

Now at that time the Buddha wanted to commence the rains residence at Sāvatthī.

Nandiya the Sakyan heard about this, and thought, “Why don’t I also commence the rains residence at Sāvatthī. There I can apply myself to my work and from time to time get to see the Buddha.”

So the Buddha commenced the rains residence in Sāvatthī, and so did Nandiya. There he applied himself to his work and from time to time got to see the Buddha.

At that time several mendicants were making a robe for the Buddha, thinking that when his robe was finished and the three months of the rains residence had passed the Buddha would set out wandering.

Nandiya the Sakyan heard about this. He went up to the Buddha, bowed, sat down to one side, and said to him:

“Sir, I have heard that several mendicants are making a robe for the Buddha, thinking that when his robe was finished and the three months of the rains residence had passed the Buddha would set out wandering. Now, we spend our life in various ways. Which of these should we practice?”

“Good, good Nandiya! It’s appropriate that gentlemen such as you come to me and ask: ‘We spend our life in various ways. Which of these should we practice?’

  1. The faithful succeed, not the faithless.
  2. The ethical succeed, not the unethical.
  3. The energetic succeed, not the lazy.
  4. The mindful succeed, not the unmindful.
  5. Those with immersion succeed, not those without immersion.
  6. The wise succeed, not the witless.

When you’re grounded on these six things, go on to develop five further things.

Firstly, you should recollect the Realized One: ‘That Blessed One is perfected, a fully awakened Buddha, accomplished in knowledge and conduct, holy, knower of the world, supreme guide for those who wish to train, teacher of gods and humans, awakened, blessed.’ In this way you should establish mindfulness internally based on the Realized One.

Furthermore, you should recollect the teaching: ‘The teaching is well explained by the Buddha—apparent in the present life, immediately effective, inviting inspection, relevant, so that sensible people can know it for themselves.’ In this way you should establish mindfulness internally based on the teaching.

Furthermore, you should recollect your good friends: ‘I’m fortunate, so very fortunate, to have good friends who advise and instruct me out of kindness and compassion.’ In this way you should establish mindfulness internally based on good friends.

Furthermore, you should recollect your own generosity: ‘I’m so fortunate, so very fortunate. Among people with hearts full of the stain of stinginess I live at home rid of stinginess, freely generous, open-handed, loving to let go, committed to charity, loving to give and to share.’ In this way you should establish mindfulness internally based on generosity.

Furthermore, you should recollect the deities: ‘There are deities who, surpassing the company of deities that consume solid food, are reborn in a certain host of mind-made deities. They don’t see in themselves anything more to do, or anything that needs improvement.’ An irreversibly freed mendicant doesn’t see in themselves anything more to do, or anything that needs improvement. In the same way, Nandiya, there are deities who, surpassing the company of deities that consume solid food, are reborn in a certain host of mind-made deities. They don’t see in themselves anything more to do, or anything that needs improvement. In this way you should establish mindfulness internally based on the deities.

A noble disciple who has these eleven qualities gives up bad, unskillful qualities and doesn’t cling to them. It’s like when a pot full of water is tipped over, so the water drains out and doesn’t go back in. Suppose there was an uncontrolled fire. It advances burning up dry woodlands and doesn’t go back over what it has burned. In the same way, a noble disciple who has these eleven qualities gives up bad, unskillful qualities and doesn’t cling to them.”


Read this translation of Aṅguttara Nikāya 11.13 Nandiyasutta: With Nandiya by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or listen on SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

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SN 6.13 Andhakavindasutta: At Andhakavinda

At one time the Buddha was staying in the land of the Magadhans at Andhakavinda.

Now at that time the Buddha was meditating in the open during the dark of night, while a gentle rain drizzled down.

Then, late at night, the beautiful Brahmā Sahampati, lighting up the entirety of Andhakavinda, went up to the Buddha, bowed, stood to one side, and recited these verses in the Buddha’s presence:

“One should frequent secluded lodgings,
and practice to be released from fetters.
If you don’t find enjoyment there,
live in the Saṅgha, guarded and mindful.

Walking for alms from family to family,
with senses guarded, alert and mindful.
One should frequent secluded lodgings,
free of fear, freed in the fearless.

Where dreadful serpents slither,
where the lightning flashes and the sky thunders
in the dark of the night;
there meditates a mendicant, free of goosebumps.

For this has in fact been seen by me,
it isn’t just what the testament says.
Within a single spiritual dispensation
a thousand are conquerors of Death.

And of trainees there are more than five hundred,
and ten times ten tens;
all are stream-enterers,
freed from rebirth in the animal realm.

And as for other people
who I think have shared in merit—
I couldn’t even number them,
for fear of speaking falsely.”


Read this translation of Saṁyutta Nikāya 6.13 Andhakavindasutta: At Andhakavinda by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net or SuttaFriends.org. Or listen on PaliAudio.com or SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.