Dhp 354 From… Taṇhā Vagga: Craving

The gift of Dhamma surpasses all gifts.
The taste of Dhamma surpasses all taste.
The delight in Dhamma surpasses all delights.
The destruction of cravings conquers all suffering.


Read the entire translation of Dhammapada 24 Taṇhā Vagga: Craving (334-359) by Ven. Kiribathgoda Gnananda Thero on SuttaFriends.org. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net, SuttaFriends.org, DhammaTalks.org, Ancient-Buddhist-Texts.net or AccessToInsight.org. Or listen on Voice.SuttaCentral.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

Khp 5 From… Mahā Maṅgala Sutta: Discourse on Blessings

…Generosity, righteous conduct,
giving assistance to relatives,
and doing blameless deeds
these are the highest blessings….


Read the entire translation of Khuddakapāṭha 5 Mahā Maṅgala Sutta: Discourse on Blessings by Ven. Kiribathgoda Gnananda Thero on SuttaFriends.org as well as an audio recording in Pali and English.

Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net, SuttaFriends.org, DhammaTalks.org, Ancient-Buddhist-Texts.net or AccessToInsight.org. Or listen on Voice.SuttaCentral.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

Dhp 177 From… Loka Vagga: The World

Truly, misers never go to heaven.
Fools, indeed, never praise generosity.
But the wise rejoice in generosity,
and so find happiness hereafter.


Read the entire translation of Dhammapada 13 Loka Vagga: The World (167-178) by Ven. Kiribathgoda Gnananda Thero on SuttaFriends.org. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net, DhammaTalks.org, Ancient-Buddhist-Texts.net or AccessToInsight.org. Or listen on Voice.SuttaCentral.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

Pv 1.9 Mahāpesakāra Sutta: Master Weaver

A monk sees a ghost and discusses his experience with others.

Monk:

She eats excrement, urine, blood, and pus. Why does she do this? What has she done for her to have to always feed on blood and pus? New clothes which are very clean, soft, and beautiful turn to hard metal plates when they are given to her. What bad karma has this woman done?

Man:

She was my wife. She was very greedy, mean, and never gave to anyone. When I offered gifts to monks, she would insult me. She cursed me saying, “As you offer food, let this food return to you in the form of excrement, urine, blood, and pus! As you offer clothes, let these clothes return to you in the form of metal plates!” Since she had this evil mind, she now suffers in the ghost world eating filth for a long time.


Read this translation of Petavatthu 1.9 Mahāpesakāra Sutta: Master Weaver by Ven. Kiribathgoda Gnananda Thero on SuttaFriends.org. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

You can find the entire translation of the Petavatthu: Stories of Ghosts available on SuttaFriends.org. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

Itv 26 Dānasaṁvibhāga Sutta: Giving and Sharing

This discourse was taught by the Blessed One, taught by the Arahant, the fully enlightened Supreme Buddha. This is as I heard:

“Monks, if people knew as I know the results of giving and sharing, they would not eat without having given nor would the stain of stinginess overcome their minds. Even if it were their last bite, their last mouthful, they would not eat without having shared, if there was someone to share it with. But, monks, because people do not know as I know the results of giving and sharing, they eat without having given. The stain of stinginess overcomes their minds.”

This is the meaning of what the Blessed One said. So, with regard to this, it was said:

If people only knew—
so taught the Great Sage—
how the result of sharing has such great fruit,
then people would subdue the stain of stinginess
and with pleased minds
they would give gifts in proper occasion
to the noble ones where a gift bears great fruit.

Having given much food as offerings
to those most worthy of offerings,
the donors go to heaven
when they pass away from here,
the human state.

Having gone to heaven,
they rejoice and enjoy divine pleasures as they desire.
The generous people experience
the result of generously sharing with others.

This, too, is the meaning of what was said by the Blessed One. This is exactly as I heard.


Read this translation of Itivuttaka 26 Dānasaṁvibhāga Sutta: Giving and Sharing by Ven. Kiribathgoda Gnananda Thero on SuttaFriends.org. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net, or DhammaTalks.org. Or listen on Voice.SuttaCentral.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

Vv 5.8 Sūcī Sutta: Needle Mansion

Moggallana Bhante:

Dear Devata, your mansion is way up in the sky and spreads over one hundred and twenty kilometers. Pillars of beryl and other gemstones, and seven hundred pinnacled buildings are in your estate. It is very beautiful. Inside the mansion, you drink and eat and enjoy the sweetness of heavenly food. Guitars play sweet music. You have the five kinds of sensual pleasures. Devatas wearing gold jewelry dance for you.

What are the meritorious deeds that led to this happiness?

Tell me Devata, what kind of meritorious action did you do when you were in the human world to have gained this beauty that shines in all directions, and to have earned all these wonderful things?

That devata, delighted at being questioned by Arahant Moggallana, gladly explained what she had done that resulted in such great happiness.

Devata:

The size of the result is not equal to the size of the offering given. Giving is always great. I offered a needle to sew robes. That small offering of a needle became great.

Because of this meritorious deed, I have been born as a very beautiful devata and enjoy all the wonderful things that delight my heart.

Great Bhante, that was the meritorious action I did to have such a beautiful body which shines in all directions.


Read this translation of Vimānavatthu 5.8 Sūcī Sutta: Needle Mansion by Ven. Kiribathgoda Gnananda Thero on SuttaFriends.org. Or listen on Voice.SuttaCentral.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

You can find the entire translation of the Vimanavatthu: Stories of Heavenly Mansions available on SuttaFriends.org.

Pv 1.12 Uraga Sutta: The Snake

A beloved son of a family died but none of the family members cried at his death. The son, reborn as the god Sakka, came to the family disguised as an old man and asked them why they didn’t cry.

Father:

Just as the serpent sheds its old skin and abandons it, humans also abandon their useless body and die. That burning dead body is unaware of the crying of its relatives. Therefore I do not cry over my dead son. He went to another life according to his karma.

Mother:

He came to this world without invitation and departed without permission. He was born in this world and went from this world according to his own karma. What is the use of crying? That burning dead body is unaware of the crying of its relatives. Therefore I do not cry over my dead son. He went to another life according to his karma.

Sister:

If I would cry, I would become very exhausted. What would I gain from crying? My crying would only bring more sadness to our relatives, friends, and family. That burning dead body is unaware of the crying of its relatives. Therefore I do not cry over my dead brother. He went to another life according to his karma.

Wife:

Just as a child cries asking for the moon, it is the same as someone crying over another’s death. That burning dead body is unaware of the crying of its relatives. Therefore I do not cry over my dead husband. He went to another life according to his karma.

Servant:

Just as a shattered pot cannot be fixed, it is the same as someone crying over another’s death. That burning dead body is unaware of the crying of its relatives. Therefore I do not cry over my dead master. He went to another life according to his karma.


Read this translation of Petavatthu 1.12 Uraga Sutta: The Snake by Ven. Kiribathgoda Gnananda Thero on SuttaFriends.org. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

You can find the entire translation of the Petavatthu: Stories of Ghosts available on SuttaFriends.org.

Vv 7.9 Maṭṭakuṇḍalīvimānavatthu: Mattakundali’s Mansion

A Brahmin was crying over his dead son’s grave when he saw a grieving deva who was disguised as a young man.

Brahmin:

My dear child, you are very handsome, wearing polished earrings, garlands, and sandalwood cream. You are weeping, holding your head in your hands in the middle of this forest. Why are you crying so sadly?

Deva:

I have received a bright golden chariot, but it does not have wheels. That is why I am so sad. I am about to commit suicide.

Brahmin:

Oh dear boy, tell me, what kind of wheels do you need? Should they be made of gold, jewels, rubies, or silver? I will give you a pair of wheels made from anything.

Deva:

We can see the sun and moon right here. It would be great if my chariot could have them as wheels.

Brahmin:

Oh, dear boy, you are indeed foolish. You seek something that cannot be obtained. I am sure that you will die from sadness because it is impossible to get the sun and moon as your wheels.

Deva:

But wait a minute. We can see the sun and moon moving in the sky. We can see their color and tracks. But when someone dies, one can never see him again. So, who is more foolish, you or me? You are crying over your dead son, who cannot even be seen, and I am crying over something that can at least be seen.

Brahmin:

Oh, dear boy, what you just said is very true. Of the two of us, I am the greater fool. I am crying to get my dead son back, like a childish boy crying to obtain the moon.

My heart was burning with sadness over the death of my son, like when ghee is poured onto a fire. But now, all my sorrow has been extinguished as if I had been sprayed with water. I was struck with an arrow of grief, but you have removed it from me, my dear boy. Having heard your advice, I have become tranquil and cool, with the arrow of sorrow removed. I no longer grieve or weep.

Are you a god, a divine musician, the god Sakka, or someone’s son? Who are you?

Deva:

Your son has been cremated in this cemetery. You are weeping over his remains. I am that son of yours. Having done a meritorious deed, I was reborn in the Tavatimsa Heaven as a deva.

Brahmin:

We have never known you to give a small or large gift in charity. We have never known you to observe the Five or Eight Precepts. What kind of meritorious action did you do to go to heaven?

Deva:

Do you remember when I was very sick and lying sadly on a bed outside our house? One day, all of a sudden, I saw the Supreme Buddha who had great wisdom and a pure mind, and who had realized everything about this world.

I was very happy and had confidence when I saw him. I quickly worshiped him. That was the only meritorious action I did to have come to this heaven.

Brahmin:

It is wonderful! Just mere worshiping has resulted in a great happiness. Without delay, on this very day, I happily place confidence in the Buddha. I go for refuge to the Buddha.

Deva:

That is exactly what you should do. From this very day, go for refuge to the Supreme Buddha, the Supreme Dhamma, and the Supreme Sangha with a confident mind. Follow the Five Precepts honestly without breaking any of them.

Stop killing any beings, never steal, never drink alcohol, never lie, never commit sexual misconduct, and be content with your own wife.

Brahmin:

Oh Deva, you really wish for my well-being. You have been very helpful to me. From today onward, you are my teacher. I will do all the things you advised me to do. With a confident mind I go for refuge to the Supreme Buddha, the excellent Dhamma, and the disciples of the Great Teacher – the Noble Sangha. I will stop killing living beings, never steal anything, never drink alcohol, never lie, and never commit sexual misconduct. I will be content with my own wife.


To learn the whole background story of Maṭṭakuṇḍali’s sad human life and his father’s horrible actions, read the commentary to Dhammapada verse 2 on ancient-buddhist-texts.net.

Read this translation of Vimānavatthu 7.9 Maṭṭakuṇḍalī Sutta: Mattakundali’s Mansion by Ven. Kiribathgoda Gnananda Thero on SuttaFriends.org. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

You can find the entire translation of the Vimanavatthu: Stories of Heavenly Mansions available on SuttaFriends.org.

SN 1.3 Upanīya Sutta: The Discourse About Life That Is Led on Towards Death

This is as I heard. At one time the Blessed One was staying in the province of Sāvatthī, in Jeta’s park, at Anathapiṇḍika’s monastery. Then, late at night, a glorious deity, lighting up the entire Jeta’s park, went up to the Blessed One, bowed, stood to one side, and recited this verse:

“This life is led on towards death.
The time left to live is short.
Beings led on towards death by old age
have no place to find shelter.
One who sees this fear in death
must do good deeds that bring comfort.”

The Blessed One:

“This life is led on towards death.
The time left to live is short.
Beings led on towards death by old age
have no place to find shelter.
One who sees this fear in death,
seeking the comfort attained by Nibbāna,
should drop the world’s bait.”

Sādhu! Sādhu!! Sādhu!!!


Read this translation of Saṁyutta Nikāya 1.3 Upanīya Sutta: The Discourse About Life That Is Led on Towards Death by Ven. Kiribathgoda Gnananda Thero on SuttaFriends.org. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net. Or listen on PaliAudio.com or Voice.SuttaCentral.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

DN 14 From… Mahāpadāna Sutta: Seven Fully Enlightened Buddhas

“…Monks, King Bandhuma thought, ‘Prince Vipassī must not renounce the throne. He must not go forth from the lay life to homelessness and become a recluse. And the words of the brāhmin predictors must not come true.’ Considering this, he provided the prince with even more of the five kinds of worldly pleasures, which the prince enjoyed.

“Then, after many thousands of years had passed, Prince Vipassī had his charioteer drive him to the park once more.

“Along the way he saw a large crowd gathered making a hut out of red clothes. He asked his charioteer, ‘My dear charioteer, why is that crowd making a hut out of red clothes?’

“‘Prince, that is for someone who’s dead.’

“‘Well then, drive the chariot up to the dead.’

“‘Yes, Prince,’ replied the charioteer, and did so.

“When the prince saw the body of the deceased, he addressed the charioteer, ‘But why is he called dead?’

“‘He’s called dead because now his mother and father and his relatives won’t be able to see him anymore, and he won’t see them ever again.’

“‘But my dear charioteer, am I going to die? Am I not exempt from death? Will the king and queen and my other relatives not be able to see me? And will I never see them again?’

“‘Prince, everyone will die, including you. No-one is exempt from death. The king and queen and your other relatives will no longer see you, and you will never see them again.’

“‘Well then, my dear charioteer, that’s enough of the park for today. Let’s return to the royal palace.’

“‘Yes, Prince,’ replied the charioteer and returned to the royal palace.

“Back at the royal palace, the prince was sad and unhappily thought, ‘Shame on this thing called birth, since old age, sickness, and death will come to anyone who’s born.’

“Then King Bandhuma summoned the charioteer and asked, ‘My dear charioteer, I hope the prince enjoyed himself at the park? I hope he was happy there?’

“‘No, sire, the prince didn’t enjoy himself at the park. He didn’t go to the park.’

“‘But what did he see on the way to the park?’ And the charioteer told the king about seeing the dead man and the prince’s reaction.…”


Read the entire translation of Dīgha Nikāya 14 Mahāpadāna Sutta: Seven Fully Enlightened Buddhas by Ven. Kiribathgoda Gnananda Thero on SuttaFriends.org.