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AN 1.189: Foremost with great wisdom

“Monks, the foremost of my monk disciples with great wisdom is Sāriputta.”


Read this translation of Aṅguttara Nikāya 1.188-1.234: Foremost Monks by Ven. Kiribathgoda Gnananda Thero on SuttaFriends.org. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net. Or listen on PaliAudio.com or SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

Or read a translation in Čeština, Deutsch, বাংলা, Español, Bahasa Indonesia, 日本語, မြန်မာဘာသာ, Русский, සිංහල, ไทย, Tiếng Việt, or 汉语. Learn how to find your language.

Pv 2.1 Saṃsāramocaka Sutta: Sāriputta Bhante Helps a Ghost

Sāriputta Bhante sees a female ghost and asks,

Sāriputta Bhante:

You are naked and very ugly, your veins are popping out. You thin person, with your ribs sticking out, who are you?

Ghost:

I am a ghost, sir. I am suffering in the world of Yama. I have done an evil deed as a human and have been reborn in the world of ghosts.

Sāriputta Bhante:

Now what evil deed have you done by body, speech, or mind for you to have been born in the world of ghosts?

Ghost:

Nobody had sympathy for me. Neither my father, mother, nor relatives encouraged me to give alms to monks. Therefore, I did not give alms. I must wander around the world naked and always hungry for five hundred years. This is the result of my evil deed.

I pay respect to you good sir with a very happy mind. Please have compassion towards me, oh noble monk. Please offer something and share the merits with me. Please release me from this state of misery.

Sāriputta Bhante:

Very well.

Out of kindness Sāriputta Bhante offered a handful of rice, a piece of cloth and a bowl of water to monks. He then shared the merits with the female ghost. The result of that merit was received by the female ghost immediately in the form of food, drink, and clothing. She became clean and fresh with the cleanest and finest clothes. She approached Sāriputta Bhante.

Sāriputta Bhante:

Who are you, with heavenly beauty, shining in all directions like a star? Why are you so beautiful? What merit have you collected when you were a human?

Ghost:

Sāriputta Bhante, you were very compassionate when you saw me in a miserable state: thin, starved, and naked with rough skin. You offered the monks a handful of rice, a piece of cloth, and a bowl of water then dedicated the merit to me.

Now look at the result of offering a handful of rice. For a thousand years I will eat delicious food whenever I want.

Look at the result of offering a piece of cloth. I have as many clothes as King Nanda. Still I have more clothes than that, made from silk, wool, linen, and cotton. There are lots of expensive clothes, so many they even hang from the sky. I can wear whatever I want.

Look at the result of offering a bowl of water. I have gained a beautiful pond with clear and cool water. It is surrounded by fine sand and there are fragrant lotuses and lilies with flower petals floating in the water. I am very happy playing in the water. I am not afraid of anything. You were very compassionate to me Bhante. I have come to worship you.


Read this translation of Petavatthu 2.1 Saṃsāramocaka Sutta: Sāriputta Bhante Helps a Ghost by Ven. Kiribathgoda Gnananda Thero on SuttaFriends.org. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

Or read a translation in Deutsch, 日本語, සිංහල, or Tiếng Việt. Learn how to find your language.

You can find the entire translation of the Petavatthu: Stories of Ghosts available on SuttaFriends.org.

MN 142 From… Dakkhiṇāvibhaṅga Sutta: The Analysis of Giving—Gifts to an Individual

[NOTE: In the part of the sutta after this the Buddha goes on to explain that a gift to a saṅgha is always greater than a gift to an individual]

“…Now, Ānanda, gifts to the following individuals may be expected to yield the following returns. 

“Giving a gift to an animal, yields a return a hundred times over. 

“Giving a gift to an unvirtuous ordinary person, yields a return a thousand times over

“Giving a gift to a virtuous ordinary person, yields a return a hundred thousand times over (100,000). 

“Giving a gift to an outsider free of desire for sense pleasures, yields a return a trillion times over (1,000,000,000,000). 

“But giving a gift to someone practicing to realize the fruit of stream-entry yields incalculable, immeasurable returns. How much more so giving a gift to a stream-enterer? How much more so giving a gift to someone practicing to realize the fruit of once-return? How much more so giving a gift to a once-returner? How much more so giving a gift to someone practicing to realize the fruit of non-return? How much more so giving a gift to a non-returner? How much more so giving a gift to someone practicing to realize the fruit of arahantship? How much more so giving a gift to an arahant? How much more so giving a gift to a Private Buddha? 

“How much more so giving a gift to the Supreme Buddha?…”


Read the entire translation of Majjhima Nikāya 142 Dakkhiṇāvibhaṅga Sutta: The Analysis of Giving by Ven. Kiribathgoda Gnananda Thero on SuttaFriends.org. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net, or Ancient-Buddhist-Texts.net. Or listen on PaliAudio.com or SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

Or read a translation in বাংলা, Deutsch, Español, Français, हिन्दी, Bahasa Indonesia, Italiano, 日本語, မြန်မာဘာသာ, Norsk, Português, Русский, සිංහල, Slovenščina, ไทย, Tiếng Việt, or 汉语. Learn how to find your language.

Vv 1.11 Patibbatā Sutta: Honest Wife Mansion

Moggallana Bhante:

Dear Devata, your mansion is very beautiful. It is decorated with all kinds of flowers. Divine herons, peacocks, geese, and sweet-voiced cuckoos fly around the mansion. Pretty gods and goddesses are always dancing and singing to entertain you.

Devata, you are very mighty, possessing many kinds of psychic powers. Tell me Devata, what kind of meritorious action did you do when you were in the human world to have gained this beauty that shines in all directions, and to have earned all these wonderful things?

That devata, delighted at being questioned by Arahant Moggallana, gladly explained what she had done that resulted in such great happiness.

Devata:

In my previous life, I was a woman in the human world. I was a very honest and faithful wife. I never had a desire for someone else’s husband. I protected my husband like a mother protects her only child. There were times that I got angry, but I never spoke harshly to him.

I never told lies; lying was not a part of my life. I delighted in giving and sharing. I practiced generosity with a happy mind. I offered food and drink with respect.

Because of these meritorious deeds, I have been born as a very beautiful devata and enjoy all the wonderful things that delight my heart.

Great Bhante, these are the meritorious deeds I did to have such a beautiful body that shines in all directions.


Read this translation of Vimānavatthu 1.11 Patibbatā Sutta: Honest Wife Mansion by Ven. Kiribathgoda Gnananda Thero on SuttaFriends.org. Or listen on SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

Or read a translation in Deutsch, 日本語, Русский, සිංහල, or Tiếng Việt. Learn how to find your language.

You can find the entire translation of the Vimanavatthu: Stories of Heavenly Mansions available on SuttaFriends.org.

Dhp 334-359 Taṇhā Vagga: Craving—Part 2

347. Those who are obsessed with passion and have fallen into the flood of craving, are like a spider, caught in its own web. This, too, the wise cut off. In order to abandon all suffering, without any longing for sense pleasures, wise people become monks and nuns.

348. Let go of regret over the past, let go of dreaming over the future, and let go of clinging to the present. Go beyond existence. With the mind liberated in every way, do not come again and again to the world of birth and old age.

349. Some people are occupied with sensual thoughts. With a mind of strong lust, they focus on what is pleasant. In them, craving grows more and more. Indeed, they strengthen their bond of craving.

350. He who delights in subduing lustful thoughts, who meditates on the impurities of the body and is constantly mindful—it is he who will make an end of craving and will cut Māra’s bond.

351. The monk who has reached the end goal, Nibbāna, is fearless, free from craving, taintless, and has plucked out the spikes called existence—for him, this is the last body.

352. The monk who is free from craving and attachment, is skilled in teaching the true meanings of the Dhamma, and knows the meaning of words and phrases,—he, indeed, is the bearer of his final body. He is truly called the profoundly wise one, the great man.

353. I have conquered all unwholesome things. I have realized everything. I am stained by nothing. Abandoning all, I am freed through the destruction of craving. Having thus, directly realized all by myself, whom shall I call my teacher?

354. The gift of Dhamma surpasses all gifts. The taste of Dhamma surpasses all taste. The delight in Dhamma surpasses all delights. The destruction of cravings conquers all suffering.

355. Wealth destroys those who lack in wisdom, but, those who seek Nibbāna are not destroyed like that. The foolish person is destroyed by his own craving for wealth, as if he had made someone destroy him.

356. Weeds are the ruin of fields; passion is the ruin of people. Therefore, what is offered to those free of passion bears great fruit.

357. Weeds are the ruin of fields; hatred is the ruin of people. Therefore, what is offered to those free of hatred bears great fruit.

358. Weeds are the ruin of fields; delusion is the ruin of people. Therefore, what is offered to those free of delusion bears great fruit.

359. Weeds are the ruin of fields; desire is the ruin of people. Therefore, what is offered to those free of desire bears great fruit.


Read the entire translation of Dhammapada 24 Taṇhā Vagga: Craving (334-359) by Ven. Kiribathgoda Gnananda Thero on SuttaFriends.org. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net, DhammaTalks.org, Ancient-Buddhist-Texts.net or AccessToInsight.org. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

Or read a translation in Deutsch, Tiếng Việt, Català, Čeština, Español, Français, עִבְֿרִיתּ, Magyar, Italiano, 日本語, Latine, मराठी, မြန်မာဘာသာ, Nederlands, Norsk, Polski, Português, සිංහල, Slovenščina, தமிழ், or 汉语. Learn how to find your language.

Dhp 334-359 Taṇhā Vagga: Craving—Part 1

  1. The craving of a person who lives negligently spreads like a creeping vine. Like a monkey who leaps from tree to tree in the forest seeking fruits, that person leaps from life to life, in this journey of misery.
  2. Whoever is overcome by this miserable, wretched, and sticky craving, his sorrow grows like rapidly growing grass after rain.
  3. Whoever overcomes this miserable, wretched craving that is difficult to overcome, from him sorrow falls away like water drips from a lotus leaf.
  4. This I say to you: Good luck to all assembled here! Dig up the root of craving like someone in search of the fragrant root of the bīrana grass. Do not let Māra crush you over and over again, as the flood crushes a bunch of bamboo trees on a bank of the river.
  5. Just as a tree, though cut down, grows again if its roots are strong and remain uncut, so does suffering sprout again and again until the tendency of craving in the mind is rooted out.
  6. Thirty-six streams of craving flow through pleasurable objects. The misguided person who is entangled by this craving is carried away to hell by the flood of lustful thoughts.
  7. The stream of craving flows through every sense base and the creeper of craving sprouts and grows throughout your life. In seeing that the creeper has sprouted in you, cut off its roots with the sword of wisdom.
  8. When craving flows through objects, feelings of pleasure arise in beings. They get attached to that pleasure and seek more enjoyment. Undoubtedly, these people are bound to the journey of birth and old age.
  9. Surrounded by craving, these people run around frightened like a trapped rabbit. Held by fetters and bonds of defilements, they suffer repeatedly over a long time.
  10. Surrounded by craving, these people run around frightened like a trapped rabbit. Therefore, the monk who wishes for passion-free Nibbāna should destroy his own craving.
  11. There is a person who, turning away from the forest of defilements called household life, delights in the monk life. But after being freed from the forest of defilements called the household life, he runs back to it. Look at that person! Though freed, he runs back to that very bondage!
  12. If a person was bound with chains made of iron, shackles made of wood, and ropes made of hemp grass, those bonds are not called strong bonds by the wise. Instead, the infatuation and longing for jewels, ornaments, children, and wives—
  13. that, they say, is a far stronger bond, which pulls one downwards all the way to hell, and, though seemingly loose, is hard to remove. This, too, the wise cut off. By abandoning sense pleasures, and without any longing, they become monks and nuns.

Read the entire translation of Dhammapada 24 Taṇhā Vagga: Craving (334-359) by Ven. Kiribathgoda Gnananda Thero on SuttaFriends.org. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net, DhammaTalks.org, Ancient-Buddhist-Texts.net or AccessToInsight.org. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

Or read a translation in Deutsch, Tiếng Việt, Català, Čeština, Español, Français, עִבְֿרִיתּ, Magyar, Italiano, 日本語, Latine, मराठी, မြန်မာဘာသာ, Nederlands, Norsk, Polski, Português, සිංහල, Slovenščina, தமிழ், or 汉语. Learn how to find your language.

Dhp 273–289 Magga Vagga: The Path

  1. Of all paths, the Noble Eight Fold Path is the best. Of all truths, the Four Noble Truth is the best. Of all things, the passionless state, Nibbāna, is the best. Of all humans, the one with eyes of the Dhamma, Buddha, is the best.
  2. This is the only path for purifying one’s vision of truth; there is no other. Follow it and you will bewilder Māra.
  3. By following the Noble Eight Fold Path you can put an end to suffering. I have taught you this path which pulls out arrows of defilements.
  4. You, yourself, must make a strong effort to attain Nibbāna. Buddhas only point the way. Those who follow the path and those who meditate will be freed from Māra’s bonds.
  5. “All conditioned things are impermanent”—when one sees this with wisdom, one gives up admiration for suffering which is disguised as happiness. This is the path to purification, Nibbāna.
  6. “All conditioned things are suffering”— when one sees this with wisdom, one gives up admiration for suffering which is disguised as happiness. This is the path to purification, Nibbāna.
  7. “All things are not-self”—when one sees this with wisdom, one gives up admiration for suffering which is disguised as happiness. This is the path to purification, Nibbāna.
  8. The inactive one who does not exert himself when he should, who though young and strong is full of laziness, with a mind full of vain thoughts—such an indolent person does not find the path to wisdom.
  9. Let a person be watchful in speech, well restrained in mind, and not commit evil by the body. Let him purify these three courses of action and fulfill the path taught by the sages.
  10. Wisdom arises from calm and insight meditation. Without meditation wisdom decays. Knowing this two-way path for progress and decline, conduct yourself on the path which grows wisdom.
  11. Oh monks, cut down the trees of defilements, but not the trees in the forest. From the trees of defilements, fear is born. Having cut down both large and small trees of defilements, be without defilements.
  12. As long as the underbrush of desire, even the slightest, of a man towards a woman is not cut down, his mind is in bondage, like the suckling calf to its mother.
  13. Cut off craving as one plucks with his hand an autumn lotus. Cultivate only the path to excellent peace, Nibbāna, as taught by the Well-Gone One, the Buddha.
  14. “Here I will live in the rainy season, here in winter and summer”—thus thinks the fool. He does not realize the danger that death might intervene.
  15. Some people live clinging to and intoxicated by children and wealth. Suddenly they are carried away to death by Māra, as a great flood carries away a sleeping village to the ocean.
  16. For someone who is seized by Māra, there is no protection by relatives. No one can save him—not sons, not father, and not relatives.
  17. Realizing this truth, let the wise person restrain himself with virtue. Let him quickly clear the path to Nibbāna.

Read this translation of Dhammapada 20 Magga Vagga: The Path (273-289) by Ven. Kiribathgoda Gnananda Thero on SuttaFriends.org. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net, DhammaTalks.org, Ancient-Buddhist-Texts.net or AccessToInsight.org. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

Or read a translation in Deutsch, Tiếng Việt, Català, Čeština, Español, Français, עִבְֿרִיתּ, Magyar, Italiano, 日本語, Latine, मराठी, မြန်မာဘာသာ, Nederlands, Norsk, Polski, Português, සිංහල, Slovenščina, தமிழ், or 汉语. Learn how to find your language.

Dhp 209–220 Piya Vagga: The Dear

  1. Some people practice what they should not; they do not practice the greatest thing, the Dhamma. Clinging to what is dear, they abandon what is beneficial, but later they envy those who have succeeded in Dhamma practice.
  2. Do not get too attached, even to your loved ones. Have no fellowship with disagreeable people. Not seeing your loved ones is suffering; seeing the disagreeable is also suffering.
  3. Therefore, hold nothing dear, for separation from all that is dear is painful. There are no bonds for those who have nothing agreeable or disagreeable.
  4. Longing gives rise to sorrow; longing gives rise to fear. For someone released from longing, there is no sorrow; so, from what would fear arise?
  5. Affection gives rise to sorrow; affection gives rise to fear. For someone released from affection, there is no sorrow; so, from what would fear arise?
  6. Desire gives rise to sorrow; desire gives rise to fear. For someone released from desire, there is no sorrow; so, from what would fear arise?
  7. Sense desire gives rise to sorrow; sense desire gives rise to fear. For someone released from sense desire, there is no sorrow; so, from what would fear arise?
  8. Craving gives rise to sorrow; craving gives rise to fear. For someone released from craving, there is no sorrow; so, from what would fear arise?
  9. If someone is virtuous, has insight into the Four Noble Truths, is established in the Dhamma, is truthful, and is endowed with righteous living—people hold that person dear.
  10. The person who aspires to Nibbāna, though he does not reveal his goal to anyone, experiences Nibbāna in his mind. He is not bound by sense pleasures. Such a person is called “one bound up stream.”
  11. Relatives, friends, and companions welcome a long-absent person returning from abroad.
  12. Like wise in passing from this world to the next, the merit one has collected welcomes him.

Read this translation of Dhammapada 16 Piya Vagga: The Dear (209-220) by Ven. Kiribathgoda Gnananda Thero on SuttaFriends.org. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net, DhammaTalks.org, Ancient-Buddhist-Texts.net or AccessToInsight.org. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

Or read a translation in Deutsch, Tiếng Việt, Català, Čeština, Español, Français, עִבְֿרִיתּ, Magyar, Italiano, 日本語, Latine, मराठी, မြန်မာဘာသာ, Nederlands, Norsk, Polski, Português, සිංහල, Slovenščina, தமிழ், or 汉语. Learn how to find your language.

Dhp 157-166 Atta Vagga: Oneself

  1. If one holds oneself dear, one should guard oneself with care. Avoiding evil, the wise person should watch over himself at least in one of these three stages of life—childhood, adulthood, or old age.
  2. One should first establish oneself in good qualities; then only should one instruct others. Thus, the wise person will not be stained.
  3. As one instructs others, so should one act; if one would tame others, one should first be well tamed. Truly, it is very hard to tame oneself.
  4. Oneself, indeed, is one’s own protector. Who else could the protector be? With oneself well tamed, one can obtain the protection of Dhamma which is hard to obtain.
  5. The evil a foolish person does by himself, born of himself, and produced by himself, grinds him as the diamond which was produced by the gems grinds similar types of gems.
  6. The plant vines with big leaves cover the sal tree on which it grows. As a result, eventually the tree breaks down. In the same way, the person who completely covers himself with his own corrupt conduct does to himself what an enemy wishes for him.
  7. Easy to do are things that are bad and harmful to oneself. However, it is very difficult to do things that are good and beneficial for oneself.
  8. The fool, relying on evil views, scorns the teaching of the liberated ones who live righteously. The fool produces fruit that destroys himself, like the bamboo tree produces fruit bringing its own destruction.
  9. Through one’s own evil deeds one is defiled. By avoiding evil deeds one is purified. Purity or impurity entirely depends on oneself; no one can purify another.
  10. Do not lose your own welfare for the sake of others’ welfare. Clearly understand your own welfare which is the attainment of enlightenment. Therefore, work hard to be a liberated one.

Read this translation of Dhammapada 12 Atta Vagga: Oneself (157-166) by Ven. Kiribathgoda Gnananda Thero on SuttaFriends.org. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net, SuttaFriends.org, DhammaTalks.org, Ancient-Buddhist-Texts.net or AccessToInsight.org. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

Or read a translation in Deutsch, Tiếng Việt, Català, Čeština, Español, Français, עִבְֿרִיתּ, Magyar, Italiano, 日本語, Latine, मराठी, မြန်မာဘာသာ, Nederlands, Norsk, Polski, Português, සිංහල, Slovenščina, தமிழ், or 汉语. Learn how to find your language.

Dhp 100-115 Sahassa Vagga: The Thousands

  1. Better than a thousand unbeneficial words is one beneficial word which, having been heard, brings peace.
  2. Better than a thousand unbeneficial verses is one beneficial line of verse which, having been heard, brings peace.
  3. Better than reciting a hundred unbeneficial verses is one line of Dhamma which, having been heard, brings peace.
  4. Greater than a person who conquers a thousand people in battle a thousand times is the person who conquers himself in the battle of defilements.
  5. Certainly it is better to conquer oneself than others. The person who tames himself and always restrains sense faculties wins the battle.
  6. Neither a god, nor a divine musician, nor Māra, nor brahma, can turn into defeat the victory of a person who has conquered himself.
  7. Better than a thousand ritual sacrifices offered every month for a hundred years is one moment’s gift offered to a liberated one who has fully developed his mind.
  8. Better than a hundred years in the forest tending a ritual fire is one moment’s gift offered to a liberated one who has fully developed his mind.
  9. Whatever gift or offering a merit seeker might perform in an entire year is not worth one-fourth as much as worshipping the liberated ones.
  10. For the person who worships virtuous people and always reveres and serves the elders, four things increase: long life, beauty, happiness, and power.
  11. Better it is to live one day virtuous and meditative than to live a hundred years without virtue and stillness of mind.
  12. Better it is to live one day wise and meditative than to live a hundred years without wisdom and stillness of mind.
  13. Better it is to live one day energetic and resolute than to live a hundred years lazy and sluggish.
  14. Better it is to live one day seeing the arising and passing of the five groups of clinging than to live a hundred years without ever seeing their arising and passing.
  15. Better it is to live one day experiencing Nibbāna than to live a hundred years without ever experiencing Nibbāna.
  16. Better it is to live one day realizing the Supreme Dhamma than to live a hundred years without ever realizing the Supreme Dhamma.

Read this translation of Dhammapada 8 Sahassa Vagga: The Thousands (100-115) by Ven. Kiribathgoda Gnananda Thero on SuttaFriends.org. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net, SuttaFriends.org, DhammaTalks.org, Ancient-Buddhist-Texts.net or AccessToInsight.org. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

Or read a translation in Deutsch, Tiếng Việt, Català, Čeština, Español, Français, עִבְֿרִיתּ, Magyar, Italiano, 日本語, Latine, मराठी, မြန်မာဘာသာ, Nederlands, Norsk, Polski, Português, සිංහල, Slovenščina, தமிழ், or 汉语. Learn how to find your language.

Dhp 44-59 Puppha Vagga: Flowers

  1. Who will overcome this earth? Who will overcome this plane of misery? Who will overcome this world with its gods? Who will realize the well-taught words of the Dhamma, as an expert garland maker selects beautiful flowers?
  2. The trainee in the Dhamma path will overcome this earth. He will overcome the plane of misery. He will overcome this world with its gods. The trainee will realize the well-taught words of the Dhamma, as an expert garland maker selects beautiful flowers.
  3. Understanding that this body is fragile like foam, realizing life’s mirage-like nature, cutting off Māra’s flowers of defilements, go beyond the sight of Māra!
  4. The person obsessed by sense pleasures chases after them as a garland maker searches for flowers. Māra carries away that person to the plane of misery like a great flood sweeps away a sleeping village.
  5. The person obsessed by sense pleasures chases after them as a garland maker searches for flowers. Although he has not fully satisfied himself with sense pleasures, Māra brings him under his control.
  6. As a bee gathers nectar from the flower and flies away without harming the flower’s beauty or its fragrance, just so the sage goes on his alms round in the village.
  7. Do not consider what is false in what others say or what they have or have not done. Consider instead what you have or have not done.
  8. A beautiful flower that is colourful but without fragrance is not perfect. In the same way, the well spoken-words of the Buddha become fruitless for the person who does not practice them.
  9. A beautiful flower that is colourful and also fragrant is perfect. In the same way, the well-spoken words of the Buddha become fruitful for the person who practices them.
  10. As an expert garland maker makes many garlands from a heap of flowers, you who obtained the human life should do many wholesome deeds.
  11. The scent of flowers does not go against the wind. The scent of sandalwood, jasmine, and rosebay does not go against the wind. But the scent of a grateful person does travel against the wind. The scent of his virtues spreads in all directions.
  12. Of all the fragrances—sandalwood, rosebay, water lily, and jasmine—the fragrance of virtue is the sweetest.
  13. Slight is the scent of rosebay or sandalwood, but the scent of the virtuous is supreme, drifting even to heaven.
  14. The liberated ones are virtuous and practice the Dhamma diligently. They are freed from suffering by the realization of the Noble Truths. Māra never finds the path by which they are liberated.
  15. In the roadside ditch, in a heap of rubbish, blooms a lotus, sweet smelling and pleasing to the eyes.
  16. In the same way, among the rubbish heap of unaware ordinary people, the disciple of the Supreme Buddha shines brightly with wisdom.

Read this translation of Dhammapada 4 Puppha Vagga: Flowers (44-59) by Ven. Kiribathgoda Gnananda Thero on SuttaFriends.org. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net, DhammaTalks.org, Ancient-Buddhist-Texts.net or AccessToInsight.org. Or listen on Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

Or read a translation in Deutsch, Tiếng Việt, Català, Čeština, Español, Français, עִבְֿרִיתּ, Magyar, Italiano, 日本語, Latine, मराठी, မြန်မာဘာသာ, Nederlands, Norsk, Polski, Português, සිංහල, Slovenščina, தமிழ், or 汉语. Learn how to find your language.

Dhp 58–59 From… Puppha Vagga: Flowers

58. In the roadside ditch, in a heap of rubbish, blooms a lotus, sweet smelling and pleasing to the eyes.

59. In the same way, among the rubbish heap of unaware ordinary people, the disciple of the Supreme Buddha shines brightly with wisdom.


Read the entire translation of Dhammapada 4 Puppha Vagga: Flowers (44-59) by Ven. Kiribathgoda Gnananda Thero on SuttaFriends.org.

Dhp 240 From… Mala Vagga: Stain

240. As rust born from iron eats away the very iron that formed it, so does the reckless behaviour of a monk leads him to the plain of misery.


Read the entire translation of Dhammapada 18 Mala Vagga: Stain (235-255) by Ven. Kiribathgoda Gnananda Thero on SuttaFriends.org. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net, DhammaTalks.org, Ancient-Buddhist-Texts.net or AccessToInsight.org. Or listen on SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

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Dhp 49 From… Puppha Vagga: Flowers

49. As a bee gathers nectar from the flower and flies away
without harming the flower’s beauty or its fragrance,
just so the sage goes on his alms round in the village.


Read the entire translation of Dhammapada 4 Puppha Vagga: Flowers (44-59) by Ven. Kiribathgoda Gnananda Thero on SuttaFriends.org. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net, DhammaTalks.org, Ancient-Buddhist-Texts.net or AccessToInsight.org. Or listen on SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

Or read in one of 25 other modern languages.

Dhp 111 From… Sahassa Vagga: The Thousands

111. Better it is to live one day wise and meditative than to live a hundred years without wisdom and stillness of mind.


Read the entire translation of Dhammapada 8 Sahassa Vagga: The Thousands (100-115) by Ven. Kiribathgoda Gnananda Thero on SuttaFriends.org. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net, DhammaTalks.org, Ancient-Buddhist-Texts.net or AccessToInsight.org. Or listen on SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

Or read in one of 24 other modern languages.

DN 30 From… Lakkhana Sutta: The Marks of a Great Man

[The Lakkhana Sutta details the the actions the Buddha did to obtained the 32 Marks and their corresponding wholesome qualities.]

“…Monks, in some past lives the Buddha was reborn as a human being. He approached virtuous and knowledgeable people and asked: ‘Sirs, what is wholesome? What is unwholesome? What is blameworthy? What is blameless? What should be cultivated? What should not be cultivated? Doing what leads to my lasting harm and suffering? Doing what leads to my lasting welfare and happiness?’ Due to performing those deeds he was reborn in heaven. When he passed away from there and was reborn here as a human, he obtained this mark: he has smooth skin, so smooth that dust and dirt don’t stick to his body.

Possessing this mark, if this great man continues to live in the palace, he becomes a universal king. And what does he obtain as a king? He has great wisdom. Of those who enjoy worldly pleasures, no one is equal to him or surpasses him in wisdom. That’s what he obtains as a king.

And what does he obtain as the Buddha? He has great wisdom, widespread wisdom, joyful wisdom, fast wisdom, sharp wisdom, and penetrating wisdom. No being is equal to him or surpasses him in wisdom. That’s what he obtains as Buddha.”

That is what the Buddha said. On this it is said:

“In olden days, in past lives,
He was eager to understand things, he asked questions.
He was keen to learn things, he waited on virtuous people,
listening to their explanation with pure intent.

Due to that good kamma of searching for wisdom,
When he was reborn in the human world, his skin was smooth.
At his birth the mark-readers who are experts in mark-reading predicted:
‘He’ll understand even very subtle things of life.

If he doesn’t choose the monk-life,
he’ll rule the earth righteously.
Among those who instruct and who investigate things,
none is equal or better than him.

But if he chooses the monk-life,
and wisely loves that simple life,
Gaining wisdom that’s supreme and unparalleled,
The Supreme One attains enlightenment.…’”



Read the entire translation of Dīgha Nikāya 30 Lakkhana Sutta: The Marks of a Great Man by Ven. Kiribathgoda Gnananda Thero on SuttaFriends.org. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net or SuttaFriends.org. Or listen on PaliAudio.com or SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

Or read a translation in Deutsch, Srpski, Bengali, Hebrew, हिन्दी, Indonesian, Italiano, 日本語, ಕನ್ನಡ, မြန်မာဘာသာ, Norsk, Português, සිංහල, ไทย, Tiếng Việt, or 汉语. Learn how to find your language.

Pv 2.2 Sāriputtatherassa Mātu Sutta: Sāriputta Bhante’s Mother

Sāriputta Bhante sees a female ghost and asks,

Sāriputta Bhante:

You are naked and very ugly. Your veins are popping out. You thin person, with your ribs sticking out, who are you?

Ghost:

I was your mother in a previous life. Now I am living in the ghost world suffering from hunger and thirst. My food is saliva, mucus, phlegm, the fat of burning bodies, the blood of women giving birth, blood of wounds, pus, and the blood from shaving wounds. I can only feed on the pus and blood of humans and animals. I do not have a house of my own, therefore I stay in the cemetery. Oh my son, please offer alms to monks and dedicate that merit to me. Then I will be free from eating pus and blood.

Having heard what his mother said, the compassionate Sāriputta Bhante called Moggallāna Bhante, Nārada Bhante, and Kappina Bhante. Sāriputta Bhante built four huts and offered those huts along with food and drink to the whole community of monks and dedicated the merit to his mother.

The result of this donation immediately took effect in the form of food, drink, and clothing for the ghost. She became pure, wearing the cleanest and finest clothes with jewelry. Then she approached Sāriputta Bhante.

Sāriputta Bhante:

Who are you, with heavenly beauty, shining in all directions like a star? Why are you so beautiful? What merit have you collected when you were a human?

Ghost:

I was your mother in a previous life. I was reborn in the ghost world suffering from hunger and thirst. My food was saliva, mucus, phlegm, the fat of burning bodies, the blood of women giving birth, the blood of wounds, pus, and the blood from shaving wounds. I could only feed on the pus and blood of humans and animals. I did not have a house of my own, therefore I stayed in the cemetery.

I am very happy now, rejoicing in Sāriputta Bhante’s gift. I do not fear anything. I have come here to worship the compassionate Sāriputta Bhante.


Read this translation of Petavatthu 2.2 Sāriputtatherassa Mātu Sutta: Sāriputta Bhante’s Mother by Ven. Kiribathgoda Gnananda Thero on SuttaFriends.org.

You can find the entire translation of the Petavatthu: Stories of Ghosts available on SuttaFriends.org.

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Pv 3.7 Migaluddaka Sutta: The Deer-Hunter

[In several of the Petavatthu stories we find situations like this where the ghosts do not feel exclusively painful feelings.]

Man:

You are young and surrounded by male and female deities. You look very happy with all the pleasures that you have. But in the daytime, you experience very painful feelings. What did you do in your previous life?

Ghost:

I was a cruel deer hunter living in the city of Rajagaha. I was always looking for something to kill. I did not have any pity on innocent beings.

I had a friend who was very compassionate, a disciple of the Supreme Buddha. He always said, “Do not do evil deeds my friend; do not be reborn in a bad world. If you wish to go to a happy world after death, then stop killing living beings.”

I did not listen to his advice because I took pleasure in killing and was very foolish.

My friend again advised me saying “If you must kill in the daytime, then please at least stop killing at night.”

So I killed living beings in the daytime and stopped during the night.

That is why I enjoy heavenly pleasures at night, but in the day, dogs come and tear off my flesh.

Even though I only restrained from killing at night, I still gained good results from it. Now I imagine the disciples of the Supreme Buddha who practice the Dhamma diligently throughout their lives surely will attain the supreme bliss of Nibbana.


Read this translation of Petavatthu 3.7 Migaluddaka Sutta: The Deer-Hunter by Ven. Kiribathgoda Gnananda Thero on SuttaFriends.org.

You can find the entire translation of the Petavatthu: Stories of Ghosts available on SuttaFriends.org.

Vv 5.1 Maṇḍakadevaputta Sutta: Frog-Deva’s Mansion

Supreme Buddha:

Dear Deva, you are very mighty with many psychic powers. Your beautiful body shines in all directions. Now you are honoring my feet. Who are you?

Devata:

In my previous life, I was a frog living in a lake. One day I was listening to you preach. At that time a boy who was looking after cows while listening to you preach, accidentally killed me.

For just a brief moment, my mind was very pleased in hearing your voice. But now look at my psychic powers, fame, and beautiful body that I have earned from that very small act of merit.

Oh Gautama Buddha, those people who have been listening to your Dhamma for a long time will attain the fruit of the path where they escape from sorrow.


Read this translation of Vimānavatthu 5.1 Maṇḍakadevaputta Sutta: Frog-Deva’s Mansion by Ven. Kiribathgoda Gnananda Thero on SuttaFriends.org.

You can find the entire translation of the Vimanavatthu: Stories of Heavenly Mansions available on SuttaFriends.org.

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Pv 1.9 Mahāpesakāra Sutta: Master Weaver

Monk:

She eats excrement, urine, blood, and pus. Why does she do this? What has she done for her to have to always feed on blood and pus? New clothes which are very clean, soft, and beautiful turn to hard metal plates when they are given to her. What bad karma has this woman done?

Man:

She was my wife. She was very greedy, mean, and never gave to anyone. When I offered gifts to monks, she would insult me. She cursed me saying, “As you offer food, let this food return to you in the form of excrement, urine, blood, and pus! As you offer clothes, let these clothes return to you in the form of metal plates!” Since she had this evil mind, she now suffers in the ghost world eating filth for a long time.


Read this translation of Petavatthu 1.9 Mahāpesakāra Sutta: Master Weaver by Ven. Kiribathgoda Gnananda Thero on SuttaFriends.org.

You can find the entire translation of the Petavatthu: Stories of Ghosts available on SuttaFriends.org.

Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

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Pv 4.10 Gaṇa Sutta: Large Group of Ghosts

Moggallana Bhante:

You are naked, very thin, and ugly. Your rib bones are pressing against your skin. Who are you?

Ghost:

Bhante, we are ghosts. When we were in the human world, we did evil deeds. After death we were reborn in this ghost world and now suffer very much.

Moggallana Bhante:

What evil did you do by body, speech and mind to have come to this ghost world?

Ghosts:

There were many virtuous people and opportunities for collecting merits but we did not give anything. Now we have been roaming for half a month suffering from thirst.

When we feel very thirsty, we go to the river to drink. When we get close to it, the water appears as if it has dried up and all that is left is dry sand. When we are scorched by the sun, we go to the shade of a tree. Once we get there the shade disappears and the sun beats down.

A wind like fire blows and burns us. But we deserve this because we have done lots of evil deeds in our previous life. We are overcome by hunger. We travel many miles searching for food but we cannot find any. We faint and fall on the ground on our backs. Other times we fall face down. We hit our own heads and chests with frustration. Alas, this is our lack of merit. But we deserve this and other more terrible results than this. When we were rich, we did not give anything to others. We did not collect any merit.

Once we escape from this ghost world and are reborn in the human world we hope that we will be generous and virtuous. We must do many wholesome deeds.


Read this translation of Petavatthu 4.10 Gaṇa Sutta: Large Group of Ghosts by Ven. Kiribathgoda Gnananda Thero on SuttaFriends.org.

You can find the entire translation of the Petavatthu: Stories of Ghosts available on SuttaFriends.org.

Thag 3.11: The Verses of Arahant Upāli (249-251)

A newly ordained monk who entered the Buddha’s path out of faith, abandoning the home life, should practice right livelihood. He should be energetic and associate with noble friends.

A newly ordained monk who entered the Buddha’s path out of faith, abandoning the home life, should live in the midst of monks. He should learn the code of conduct well.

A newly ordained monk who entered the Buddha’s path out of faith, abandoning the home life, should be skilled in recognising what is allowable and unallowable. He should live without focusing on craving.

These verses were said by Arahant Upāli.


Read this translation of Theragāthā 3.11: The Verses of Arahant Upāli (249-251) by Ven. Kiribathgoda Gnananda Thero on SuttaFriends.org. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net. Or listen on SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

Or read a translation in Deutsch, Indonesian, 日本語, Norsk, සිංහල, or Tiếng Việt. Learn how to find your language.

You can find the entire translation of the Theragāthā: Verses of Arahant Monks available on SuttaFriends.org.

Vv 5.11 Dutiya Nāga Sutta: Second Elephant Mansion

Vangisa Bhante:

Dear Deva, you are sitting on the back of an elephant that is huge and all white. You travel from park to park, surrounded by goddesses, shining brightly in all directions like the star Osadhi.

What kind of meritorious actions did you do when you were in the human world?

That deva, delighted at being questioned by Arahant Vangisa, gladly explained what he had done that resulted in such great happiness.

Deva:

In my previous life, I was a man in the human world. I was a lay disciple of the All-Seeing Supreme Buddha. I abstained from killing, stealing, taking intoxicants, and lying. I was content with my own wife, and did not even think of other women. I offered things with a very happy mind.

Because of these meritorious deeds, I have been born as a very beautiful deva and enjoy all the wonderful things that delight my heart.

Great Bhante, those were the meritorious deeds I did to have such a beautiful body which shines brightly in all directions.


Read this translation of Vimānavatthu 5.11 Dutiya Nāga Sutta: Second Elephant Mansion by Ven. Kiribathgoda Gnananda Thero on SuttaFriends.org. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

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You can find the entire translation of the Vimanavatthu: Stories of Heavenly Mansions available on SuttaFriends.org.

Dhp 334-336 From… Taṇhā Vagga: Craving

334. The craving of a person who lives negligently spreads like a creeping vine. Like a monkey who leaps from tree to tree in the forest seeking fruits, that person leaps from life to life, in this journey of misery.

335. Whoever is overcome by this miserable, wretched, and sticky craving, his sorrow grows like rapidly growing grass after rain.

336. Whoever overcomes this miserable, wretched craving that is difficult to overcome, from him sorrow falls away like water drips from a lotus leaf.


Read the entire translation of Dhammapada 24 Taṇhā Vagga: Craving (334-359) by Ven. Kiribathgoda Gnananda Thero on SuttaFriends.org.

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Or read in 24 other modern languages.

Dhp 273-276 From… Magga Vagga: The Path

273. Of all paths, the Noble Eight Fold Path is the best. Of all truths, the Four Noble Truth is the best. Of all things, the passionless state, Nibbāna, is the best. Of all humans, the one with eyes of the Dhamma, Buddha, is the best.

274. This is the only path for purifying one’s vision of truth; there is no other. Follow it and you will bewilder Māra.

275. By following the Noble Eight Fold Path you can put an end to suffering. I have taught you this path which pulls out arrows of defilements.

276. You, yourself, must make a strong effort to attain Nibbāna. Buddhas only point the way. Those who follow the path and those who meditate will be freed from Māra’s bonds.


Read the entire translation of Dhammapada 20 Magga Vagga: The Path (273-289) by Ven. Kiribathgoda Gnananda Thero on SuttaFriends.org. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net, DhammaTalks.org, Ancient-Buddhist-Texts.net or AccessToInsight.org. Or listen on SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

Or read translations into 25 other modern languages on SuttaCentral.net.

Pv 2.10 Uttaramātu Sutta: Uttara’s Mother

A female ghost who was very ugly and scary approached a monk who was resting on the bank of the Ganges River. Her hair was extremely long and touched the ground. Covered by her hair, she spoke to the monk.

Ghost:

Bhante, it has been 55 years since I died in the human world. I have not eaten anything or drunk water since then. Please give me some water, I am very thirsty.

Monk:

There is this cool water in the Gaṅges River flowing down from the Himalayan Mountains. You can take some from here and drink. Why do you ask me for water?

Ghost:

Oh Bhante, if I take water from the river, it turns into blood. That is why I am asking you for water.

Monk:

Now what evil deed did you do by body, speech, or mind so that the water of rivers now becomes blood for you?

Ghost:

I had a son named Uttara who was a disciple of the Supreme Buddha. He donated robes, alms food, shelters, and other supplies to monks. I did not approve of what he did, so I got angry and cursed him by saying, “Hey Uttara, may the food and everything you give be received as blood in your next life!” Because of this action, the water of rivers becomes blood when I take it.


Read this translation of Petavatthu 2.10 Uttaramātu Sutta: Uttara’s Mother by Ven. Kiribathgoda Gnananda Thero on SuttaFriends.org. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

You can find the entire translation of the Petavatthu: Stories of Ghosts available on SuttaFriends.org.

Dhp 222 From… Kodha Vagga: Anger

The one who keeps anger in check as it arises,
as a charioteer controls a speeding chariot,
him I call a true charioteer.
Others are merely rein holders.


Read the entire translation of Dhammapada 17 Kodha Vagga: Anger (221-234) by Ven. Kiribathgoda Gnananda Thero on SuttaFriends.org. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net, DhammaTalks.org, Ancient-Buddhist-Texts.net or AccessToInsight.org. Or listen on SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

SN 55.43 Tatiya Asaṇkheyya Sutta: Incalculable 3

“Monks, there are four kinds of streams of merit and streams of wholesomeness that generate happiness. What four?

  1. The first is when a noble disciple has unshakable confidence in the Buddha… This is the first stream of merit and stream of wholesomeness that generates happiness.
  2. The second is when a noble disciple has unshakable confidence in the Dhamma… This is the second stream of merit and stream of wholesomeness that generates happiness.
  3. The third is when a noble disciple has unshakable confidence in the Saṅgha… This is the third stream of merit and stream of wholesomeness that generates happiness.
  4. The fourth is when a noble disciple is wise. He has the wisdom of understanding the arising and passing away of all conditioned things. That wisdom is noble, penetrative, and leads to the complete ending of suffering. This is the fourth stream of merit and stream of wholesomeness that generates happiness.

These are the four streams of merit and streams of wholesomeness that generate happiness.

“When a noble disciple has these four streams of merit and streams of wholesomeness, it’s not easy to measure how much merit he has by saying, ‘This is the amount of happiness generated by his stream of merit and stream of wholesomeness.’ His merit simply is incalculable, immeasurable and is vast.”

That is what the Buddha said. Then the Blessed One further said,

“The person who desires merit
and is established in wholesomeness,
develops the Eightfold Path
for realizing Nibbāna.
Once he’s reached the core of the Dhamma,
delighting in destroying defilements,
he doesn’t tremble at the approach of Māra.”


Read this translation of Saṁyutta Nikāya 55.43 Tatiya Asaṇkheyya Sutta: Incalculable 3 by Ven. Kiribathgoda Gnananda Thero on SuttaFriends.org. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net. Or listen on SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

Vv 2.7 Uposathā Sutta: Uposatha’s Mansion

Moggallana Bhante:

Devata, your beauty shines in all directions like the bright star named Osadhi.

What are the meritorious deeds that led to this happiness?

Tell me Devata, what kind of meritorious action did you do when you were in the human world to have gained this beauty that shines in all directions, and to have earned all these wonderful things?

That devata, delighted at being questioned by Arahant Moggallana, gladly explained what she had done that resulted in such great happiness.

Devata:

Bhante, in the human world there is a city called Saketa. There I was a female lay follower of the Supreme Buddha. My name was Uposatha. I had unshakable faith in the Triple Gem. I practiced the precepts and delighted in giving and sharing. Furthermore, I had confidence in noble monks who had pure minds. I offered them robes, food, shelter, and lamps.

I was eager to observe the Eight Precepts four times a month on each of the four moon phases. I led a restrained life and was very generous.

I abstained from killing, stealing, lying, and taking intoxicants. I did not cheat on my husband. I was delighted to keep these Five Precepts every day. I was wise enough to realize the Four Noble Truths. That is how I became a dedicated follower of Gautama Supreme Buddha.

Because of those meritorious deeds, I have been born as a very beautiful devata and enjoy all the wonderful things that delight my heart.

Great Bhante, those were the meritorious deeds I did to have such a beautiful body that shines in all directions.

When I was in the human world, I often heard stories about the heavenly Nandana Park. I had a desire to be born there. As a result of directing my mind to that park, I have been born here in this Tavatimsa Heaven.

My great teacher, the Supreme Buddha, who was born in the Clan of the Sun, frequently advised his disciples to achieve the highest stage of enlightenment they can. But I did not follow my great teacher’s advice. Since I directed my mind to this inferior sensual realm, I was born in this heaven. I could have developed my mind further. Now I am sad and regret my decision.

Moggallana Bhante:

Devata, how long will you live in this mansion? Can you tell me your lifespan?

Devata:

Bhante, My lifespan here is three hundred million and sixty thousand years. After I pass away from here I will be reborn in the human world.

Moggallana Bhante:

Why fear, Uposatha? The Supreme Buddha has already stated that you have attained the fruit of stream entry. You will never again be born in a bad world.


Read this translation of Vimānavatthu 2.7 Uposathā Sutta: Uposatha’s Mansion by Ven. Kiribathgoda Gnananda Thero on SuttaFriends.org.

You can find the entire translation of the Vimanavatthu: Stories of Heavenly Mansions available on SuttaFriends.org. Or listen on SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

SN 55.44 Aḍḍha Sutta: Rich

“Monks, a noble disciple who has four things is said to be rich, prosperous, and wealthy.

“What four? It’s when a noble disciple has unshakable confidence in the Buddha… the Dhamma… the Saṅgha… and he has the virtue loved by the noble ones… leading to concentration. A noble disciple who has these four things is said to be rich, prosperous, and wealthy.”


Read this translation of Saṁyutta Nikāya 55.44 Aḍḍha Sutta: Rich by Ven. Kiribathgoda Gnananda Thero on SuttaFriends.org. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net. Or listen on SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

SN 55.17 Dutiya Mittāmacca Sutta: Friends 2

“Monks, you have friends, relatives and family members who you have sympathy for. If they listen to your advice, you should establish them in the four factors of stream-entry. You should encourage them to have the four factors of stream-entry. What four?

“You should establish them and encourage them to have unshakable confidence in the Buddha…

“Monks, there might be change in the four primary elements—earth, water, fire, and air—but a noble disciple with unshakable confidence in the Buddha would never change. In this context, ‘change’ means that such a noble disciple will be reborn in hell, the animal world, or the ghost world: this is not possible.

“You should establish them and encourage them to have the unshakable confidence in the Dhamma…

“You should establish them and encourage them to have the unshakable confidence in the Saṅgha…

“You should establish them and encourage them to have virtue loved by the noble ones… leading to concentration.

“Monks, there might be change in the four primary elements—earth, water, fire, and air—but a noble disciple with the ethical conduct loved by the noble ones would never change. In this context, ‘change’ means that such a noble disciple will be reborn in hell, the animal world, or the ghost world: this is not possible.

“Monks, you should establish your friends, relatives and family members who you have sympathy for, in these four factors of stream-entry. If they listen to your advice, you should encourage them to have these four factors of stream-entry.”


Read this translation of Saṁyutta Nikāya 55.17 Dutiya Mittāmacca Sutta: Friends 2 by Ven. Kiribathgoda Gnananda Thero on SuttaFriends.org. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net. Or listen on SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.