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AN 5.145 Nirayasutta: Hell

“Mendicants, someone with five qualities is cast down to hell. What five? They kill living creatures, steal, commit sexual misconduct, lie, and use alcoholic drinks that cause negligence. Someone with these five qualities is cast down to hell.

Someone with five qualities is raised up to heaven What five? They don’t kill living creatures, steal, commit sexual misconduct, lie, or use alcoholic drinks that cause negligence. Someone with these five qualities is raised up to heaven.”


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MN 129 From… Bālapaṇḍitasutta: The Foolish and the Astute—Animal World

…There are, mendicants, animals that feed on grass. They eat by cropping fresh or dried grass with their teeth. And what animals feed on grass? Elephants, horses, cattle, donkeys, goats, deer, and various others. A fool who used to be a glutton here and did bad deeds here, when their body breaks up, after death, is reborn in the company of those sentient beings who feed on grass.

There are animals that feed on dung. When they catch a whiff of dung they run to it, thinking, ‘There we’ll eat! There we’ll eat!’ It’s like when brahmins smell a burnt offering, they run to it, thinking, ‘There we’ll eat! There we’ll eat!’ In the same way, there are animals that feed on dung. When they catch a whiff of dung they run to it, thinking, ‘There we’ll eat! There we’ll eat!’ And what animals feed on dung? Chickens, pigs, dogs, jackals, and various others. A fool who used to be a glutton here and did bad deeds here, after death is reborn in the company of those sentient beings who feed on dung.

There are animals who are born, live, and die in darkness. And what animals are born, live, and die in darkness? Moths, maggots, earthworms, and various others. A fool who used to be a glutton here and did bad deeds here, after death is reborn in the company of those sentient beings who are born, live, and die in darkness.

There are animals who are born, live, and die in water. And what animals are born, live, and die in water? Fish, turtles, crocodiles, and various others. A fool who used to be a glutton here and did bad deeds here, after death is reborn in the company of those sentient beings who are born, live, and die in water.

There are animals who are born, live, and die in filth. And what animals are born, live, and die in filth? Those animals that are born, live, and die in a rotten fish, a rotten carcass, rotten porridge, or a sewer. A fool who used to be a glutton here and did bad deeds here, after death is reborn in the company of those sentient beings who are born, live, and die in filth.

I could tell you many different things about the animal realm. So much so that it’s not easy to completely describe the suffering in the animal realm.…


Read the entire translation of Majjhima Nikāya 129 Bālapaṇḍitasutta: The Foolish and the Astute by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or listen on PaliAudio.com or Voice.SuttaCentral.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

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AN 2.1: Faults

So I have heard. At one time the Buddha was staying near Sāvatthī in Jeta’s Grove, Anāthapiṇḍika’s monastery. There the Buddha addressed the mendicants, “Mendicants!”

“Venerable sir,” they replied. The Buddha said this:

“There are, mendicants, these two faults. What two? The fault apparent in the present life, and the fault to do with lives to come.

What is the fault apparent in the present life? It’s when someone sees that kings have arrested a bandit, a criminal, and subjected them to various punishments—whipping, caning, and clubbing; cutting off hands or feet, or both; cutting off ears or nose, or both; the ‘porridge pot’, the ‘shell-shave’, the ‘Rāhu’s mouth’, the ‘garland of fire’, the ‘burning hand’, the ‘bulrush twist’, the ‘bark dress’, the ‘antelope’, the ‘meat hook’, the ‘coins’, the ‘caustic pickle’, the ‘twisting bar’, the ‘straw mat’; being splashed with hot oil, being fed to the dogs, being impaled alive, and being beheaded.

It occurs to them: ‘If I were to commit the kinds of bad deeds for which the kings arrested that bandit, that criminal, the rulers would arrest me and subject me to the same punishments. Afraid of the fault apparent in the present life, they do not steal the belongings of others. This is called the fault apparent in the present life.

What is the fault to do with lives to come? It’s when someone reflects: ‘Bad conduct of body, speech, or mind has a bad, painful result in the next life. If I conduct myself badly, then, when my body breaks up, after death, won’t I be reborn in a place of loss, a bad place, the underworld, hell?’ Afraid of the fault to do with lives to come, they give up bad conduct by way of body, speech, and mind, and develop good conduct by way of body, speech, and mind, keeping themselves pure. This is called the fault to do with lives to come.

These are the two faults.

So you should train like this: ‘We will fear the fault apparent in the present life, and we will fear the fault to do with lives to come. We will fear faults, seeing the danger in faults.’ That’s how you should train. If you fear faults, seeing the danger in faults, you can expect to be freed from all faults.”


Read this translation of Aṅguttara Nikāya 2.1 by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or listen on PaliAudio.com or Voice.SuttaCentral.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

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SN 20.8 Kaliṅgarasutta: Wood Blocks

So I have heard. At one time the Buddha was staying near Vesālī, at the Great Wood, in the hall with the peaked roof. There the Buddha addressed the mendicants, “Mendicants!”

“Venerable sir,” they replied. The Buddha said this:

“Mendicants, these days the Licchavis live using wood blocks as pillows, and they exercise diligently and keenly. King Ajātasattu of Magadha, son of the princess of Videha, finds no vulnerability, he’s got no foothold. But in the future the Licchavis will become delicate, with soft and tender hands and feet. They’ll sleep on soft beds with down pillows until the sun comes up. King Ajātasattu of Magadha, son of the princess of Videha, will find a vulnerability, he’ll get his foothold.

These days the mendicants live using wood blocks as pillows, and they meditate diligently and keenly. Māra the Wicked finds no vulnerability, he’s got no foothold. But in the future the mendicants will become delicate, with soft and tender hands and feet. They’ll sleep on soft beds with down pillows until the sun comes up. Māra the Wicked will find a vulnerability and will get a foothold.

So you should train like this: ‘We will live using wood blocks as pillows, and we will meditate diligently and keenly.’ That’s how you should train.”


Read this translation of Saṁyutta Nikāya 20.8 Kaliṅgarasutta: Wood Blocks by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or listen on PaliAudio.com or Voice.SuttaCentral.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

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AN 4.245 Sikkhānisaṁsasutta: The Benefits of Training

“Mendicants, this spiritual life is lived with training as its benefit, with wisdom as its overseer, with freedom as its core, and with mindfulness as its ruler.

And how is training its benefit? Firstly, I laid down for my disciples the training that deals with supplementary regulations in order to inspire confidence in those without it and to increase confidence in those who have it. They undertake whatever supplementary regulations I have laid down, keeping them unbroken, impeccable, spotless, and unmarred.

Furthermore, I laid down for my disciples the training that deals with the fundamentals of the spiritual life in order to rightly end suffering in every way. They undertake whatever training that deals with the fundamentals of the spiritual life I have laid down, keeping it unbroken, impeccable, spotless, and unmarred. That’s how training is its benefit.

And how is wisdom its overseer? I taught the Dhamma to my disciples in order to rightly end suffering in every way. They examine with wisdom any teachings I taught them. That’s how wisdom is its overseer.

And how is freedom its core? I taught the Dhamma to my disciples in order to rightly end suffering in every way. They experience through freedom any teachings I taught them. That’s how freedom is its core.

And how is mindfulness its ruler? Mindfulness is well established in oneself: ‘In this way I’ll fulfill the training dealing with supplementary regulations, or support with wisdom in every situation the training dealing with supplementary regulations I’ve already fulfilled.’ Mindfulness is well established in oneself: ‘In this way I’ll fulfill the training dealing with the fundamentals of the spiritual life, or support with wisdom in every situation the training dealing with the fundamentals of the spiritual life I’ve already fulfilled.’ Mindfulness is well established in oneself: ‘In this way I’ll examine with wisdom the teaching that I haven’t yet examined, or support with wisdom in every situation the teaching I’ve already examined.’ Mindfulness is well established in oneself: ‘In this way I’ll experience through freedom the teaching that I haven’t yet experienced, or support with wisdom in every situation the teaching I’ve already experienced.’ That’s how mindfulness is its ruler.

‘This spiritual life is lived with training as its benefit, with wisdom as its overseer, with freedom as its core, and with mindfulness as its ruler.’ That’s what I said, and this is why I said it.”


Read this translation of Aṅguttara Nikāya 4.245 Sikkhānisaṁsasutta: The Benefits of Training by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or read a different translation on DhammaTalks.org. Or listen on PaliAudio.com or Voice.SuttaCentral.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

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Ud 2.10 Bhaddiyasutta: With Bhaddiya

So I have heard. At one time the Buddha was staying near Anupiya in a mango grove. Now at that time, Venerable Bhaddiya son of Kāḷīgodhā, even in the wilderness, at the foot of a tree, or in an empty dwelling, frequently expressed this heartfelt sentiment: “Oh, what bliss! Oh, what bliss!”

Several mendicants heard him and thought, “Without a doubt, Venerable Bhaddiya leads the spiritual life dissatisfied. It’s when recalling the pleasures of royalty he formerly enjoyed as a lay person that, even in the wilderness, at the foot of a tree, or in an empty dwelling, he frequently expresses this heartfelt sentiment: ‘Oh, what bliss! Oh, what bliss!’”

Then those mendicants went up to the Buddha, bowed, sat down to one side, and told him what was happening.

So the Buddha addressed a certain monk, “Please, monk, in my name tell the mendicant Bhaddiya that the teacher summons him.”

“Yes, sir,” that monk replied. He went to Bhaddiya and said to him, “Reverend Bhaddiya, the teacher summons you.” “Yes, reverend,” Bhaddiya replied. He went to the Buddha, bowed, and sat down to one side. The Buddha said to him:

“Is it really true, Bhaddiya, that even in the wilderness, at the foot of a tree, or in an empty dwelling, you frequently express this heartfelt sentiment: ‘Oh, what bliss! Oh, what bliss!’?” “Yes, sir.”

“But why do you say this?” “Formerly, as a lay person ruling the land, my guard was well organized within and without the royal compound, within and without the city, and within and without the country. But although I was guarded and defended in this way, I remained fearful, scared, suspicious, and nervous. But these days, even when alone in the wilderness, at the foot of a tree, or in an empty dwelling, I’m not fearful, scared, suspicious, or nervous. I live relaxed, unruffled, surviving on charity, my heart free as a wild deer. It is for this reason that, even in the wilderness, at the foot of a tree, or in an empty dwelling, I frequently expressed this heartfelt sentiment: ‘Oh, what bliss! Oh, what bliss!’”

Then, understanding this matter, on that occasion the Buddha expressed this heartfelt sentiment:

“They who hide no anger within,
gone beyond any kind of existence;
happy, free from fear and sorrow—
even the gods can’t see them.”


Read this translation of Udāna 2.10 Bhaddiyasutta: With Bhaddiya by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net.

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AN 5.128 Samaṇasukhasutta: An Ascetic’s Happiness

“Mendicants, there are these five kinds of suffering for an ascetic. What five? It’s when a mendicant is not content with any kind of robe, almsfood, lodging, and medicines and supplies for the sick. And they lead the spiritual life dissatisfied. These are five kinds of suffering for an ascetic.

There are these five kinds of happiness for an ascetic. What five? It’s when a mendicant is content with any kind of robe, almsfood, lodging, and medicines and supplies for the sick. And they lead the spiritual life satisfied. These are five kinds of happiness for an ascetic.”


Read this translation of Aṅguttara Nikāya 5.128 Samaṇasukhasutta: An Ascetic’s Happiness by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or listen on Voice.SuttaCentral.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

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Snp 4.7 Tissametteyyasutta: With Tissametteyya

“When someone indulges in sex,”
said Venerable Tissametteyya,
“tell us, sir: what trouble befalls them?
After hearing your instruction,
we shall train in seclusion.”

“When someone indulges in sex,”
replied the Buddha,
“they forget their instructions
and go the wrong way—
that is something ignoble in them.

Someone who formerly lived alone
and then resorts to sex
is like a chariot careening off-track;
in the world they call them a low, ordinary person.

Their former fame and reputation
also fall away.
Seeing this, they’d train
to give up sex.

Oppressed by thoughts,
they brood like a wretch.
When they hear what others are saying,
such a person is embarrassed.

Then they lash out with verbal daggers
when reproached by others.
This is their great blind spot;
they sink to lies.

They once were considered astute,
committed to the solitary life.
But then they indulged in sex,
dragged along by desire like an idiot.

Knowing this danger
in falling from a former state here,
a sage would firmly resolve to wander alone,
and would not resort to sex.

They’d train themselves only in seclusion;
this, for the noble ones, is highest.
One who’d not think themselves “best” due to that
has truly drawn near to extinguishment.

People tied to sensual pleasures envy them:
the isolated, wandering sage
who has crossed the flood,
unconcerned for sensual pleasures.


Read this translation of Snp 4.7 Tissametteyyasutta: With Tissametteyya by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net.

Thag 10.6 Vaṅgantaputtaupasenattheragāthā: Upasena son of Vaṅgantā

In order to go on retreat,
a monk should stay in lodgings
that are secluded and quiet,
frequented by beasts of prey.

Having gathered scraps from rubbish heaps,
cemeteries and streets,
and making an outer robe from them,
one should wear that coarse robe.

Humbling their heart,
a mendicant should walk for alms
from family to family indiscriminately,
with sense doors guarded, well-restrained.

They should be content even with coarse food,
not hoping for lots of flavors.
The mind that’s greedy for flavors
doesn’t enjoy absorption.

With few wishes, content,
a sage should live secluded,
mixing with neither
householders nor the homeless.

They should present themselves
as if stupid or dumb;
an astute person would not speak overly long
in the midst of the Saṅgha.

They would not insult anyone,
and would avoid causing damage.
Restrained in the monastic code,
they would eat in moderation.

Expert in the arising of thought,
they would grasp well the pattern of the mind.
They would be devoted to practicing
serenity and discernment at the right time.

Though endowed with energy and perseverance,
and always devoted to meditation,
a wise person would not be too sure of themselves,
until they have attained the end of suffering.

For a mendicant who meditates in this way,
longing for purification,
all their defilements wither away,
and they realize quenching.


Read this translation of Theragāthā 10.6 Vaṅgantaputtaupasenattheragāthā: Upasena son of Vaṅgantā by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or read a different translation on SuttaFriends.org. Or listen on Voice.SuttaCentral.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

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Thag 1.36 Kumāputtattheragāthā: Kumāputta

Learning is good, living well is good,
the homeless life is always good.
Questions on the meaning, actions that are skillful:
this is the ascetic life for one who has nothing.


Read this translation of Theragāthā 1.36 Kumāputtattheragāthā: Kumāputta by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or read a different translation on SuttaFriends.org. Or listen on Voice.SuttaCentral.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

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