Below are suttas that have been sent in the past, starting with the most recent. To see the suttas published in a specific month, try using the Archive page.

MN 123 From Acchariyaabbhutasutta: Incredible and Amazing—Proclamation

“…I have learned this in the presence of the Buddha: ‘As soon as he’s born, the being intent on awakening stands firm with his own feet on the ground. Facing north, he takes seven strides with a white parasol held above him, surveys all quarters, and makes this dramatic proclamation:

“I am the foremost in the world!
I am the eldest in the world!
I am the first in the world!
This is my last rebirth.
Now there are no more future lives.”’

This too I remember as an incredible quality of the Buddha.

Spoken by Venerable Ānanda


Read the entire translation of Majjhima Nikāya 123 Acchariyaabbhutasutta: Incredible and Amazing by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or read a different translation on DhammaTalks.org.

AN 1.170 from Ekapuggalavagga: One Person

“One person, mendicants, arises in the world for the welfare and happiness of the people, out of compassion for the world, for the benefit, welfare, and happiness of gods and humans. What one person? The Realized One, the perfected one, the fully awakened Buddha. This is the one person, mendicants, who arises in the world for the welfare and happiness of the people, out of compassion for the world, for the benefit, welfare, and happiness of gods and humans.”


Read this translation of Aṅguttara Nikāya 1.170–187 Ekapuggalavagga: 170 by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or read a different translation on SuttaFriends.org.

MN 123 From Acchariyaabbhutasutta: Incredible and Amazing—Birth

“…I have learned this in the presence of the Buddha: ‘When the being intent on awakening emerges from his mother’s womb, then—in this world with its gods, Māras and Brahmās, this population with its ascetics and brahmins, gods and humans—an immeasurable, magnificent light appears, surpassing the glory of the gods. Even in the boundless desolation of interstellar space—so utterly dark that even the light of the moon and the sun, so mighty and powerful, makes no impression—an immeasurable, magnificent light appears, surpassing the glory of the gods. And the sentient beings reborn there recognize each other by that light: “So, it seems other sentient beings have been reborn here!” And this galaxy shakes and rocks and trembles. And an immeasurable, magnificent light appears in the world, surpassing the glory of the gods.’ This too I remember as an incredible and amazing quality of the Buddha.”

Spoken by Venerable Ānanda


Read the entire translation of Majjhima Nikāya 123 Acchariyaabbhutasutta: Incredible and Amazing by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or read a different translation on DhammaTalks.org.

Thag 3.15: The Verses of Arahant Hārita (261-263)

261. If one thinks to do things later that should’ve been done before he will miss the chance to gain happiness. He will be remorseful later.

262. One should say only what one would do; one should not say what one will not do. Wise people do not praise those who talk but don’t act as they speak.

263. Nibbāna, taught by the Supreme Buddha, is truly the highest happiness. Suffering ceases only there. In Nibbāna there is no sorrow or defilements. True assurance is in Nibbāna.

These verses were said by Arahant Hārita.


Read this translation of Theragāthā 3.15: The Verses of Arahant Hārita (261-263) by Ven. Kiribathgoda Gnananda Thero on SuttaFriends.org. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net, SuttaFriends.org, or DhammaTalks.org.

AN 5.178 From Rājāsutta: Kings

“…What do you think, mendicants? Have you ever seen or heard of a person who has given up alcoholic drinks that cause negligence, and then the kings have them arrested for that, and execute, imprison, or banish them, or do what the case requires?”

“No, sir.”

“Good, mendicants! I too have never seen or heard of such a thing. Rather, the kings are informed of someone’s bad deed: ‘While under the influence of alcoholic drinks that cause negligence, this person murdered a woman or a man. Or they stole something from a village or wilderness. Or they had sexual relations with women or maidens under someone else’s protection. Or they ruined a householder or householder’s child by lying.’ Then the kings have them arrested for being under the influence of alcoholic drinks that cause negligence, and execute, imprison, or banish them, or do what the case requires. Have you ever seen or heard of such a case?”

“Sir, we have seen it and heard of it, and we will hear of it again.”



Read the entire translation of Aṅguttara Nikāya 5.178 Rājāsutta: Kings by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net.

Dhp 14 From… Buddhavaggo: The Chapter about the Buddha

188. Many people shaken
by fear go for refuge
to woods, mountains, and to
tree shrines in pleasure parks.

189. That is not a secure refuge,
that is not the refuge supreme,
that is not the refuge that will
liberate from all suffering.

190. Whoever has gone for refuge
to the Buddha, to the Dhamma
and to the Saṅgha, who sees with
right wisdom the four noble truths:

191. Suffering, arising, and the
overcoming of suffering,
the eightfold noble path leading
to the stilling of suffering.

192. That is the one secure refuge,
that is the one refuge supreme,
that is the one refuge that will
liberate from all suffering.


Read this translation from Dhammapada chapter 14 Buddhavaggo: The Chapter about the Buddha by Bhikkhu Ānandajoti on Ancient-Buddhist-Texts.net. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net, SuttaFriends.org, or DhammaTalks.org.

AN 8.1 Mettāsutta: Loving-Kindness

Thus have I heard. On one occasion the Blessed One was dwelling at Sāvatthī in Jeta’s Grove, Anāthapiṇḍika’s Park. There the Blessed One addressed the bhikkhus: “Bhikkhus!”

“Venerable sir!” those bhikkhus replied. The Blessed One said this:

“Bhikkhus, when the liberation of the mind by loving-kindness has been pursued, developed, and cultivated, made a vehicle and basis, carried out, consolidated, and properly undertaken, eight benefits are to be expected. What eight?

(1) “One sleeps well;
(2) one awakens happily;
(3) one does not have bad dreams;
(4) one is pleasing to human beings;
(5) one is pleasing to spirits;
(6) deities protect one;
(7) fire, poison, and weapons do not injure one; and
(8) if one does not penetrate further, one moves on to the brahmā world.

“When, bhikkhus, the liberation of the mind by loving-kindness has been pursued, developed, and cultivated, made a vehicle and basis, carried out, consolidated, and properly undertaken, these eight benefits are to be expected.”

For one who, ever mindful, develops
measureless loving-kindness,
the fetters thin out as he sees
the destruction of the acquisitions.

If, with a mind free from hate,
one arouses love toward just one being,
one thereby becomes good.
Compassionate in mind toward all beings,
the noble one generates abundant merit.

Those royal sages who conquered the earth
with its multitudes of beings
traveled around performing sacrifices:
the horse sacrifice, the person sacrifice,
sammāpāsa, vājapeyya, niraggaḷa.

All these are not worth a sixteenth part
of a well-developed loving mind,
just as the hosts of stars cannot match
a sixteenth part of the moon’s radiance.

One who does not kill or enjoin killing,
who does not conquer or enjoin conquest,
one who has loving-kindness toward all beings
harbors no enmity toward anyone.


Read this translation of Aṅguttara Nikāya 8.1 Mettāsutta: Loving-Kindness by Bhikkhu Bodhi on SuttaCentral.net. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net.

AN 3.10 Malasutta: Stains

“Bhikkhus, possessing three qualities and without having abandoned three stains, one is deposited in hell as if brought there. What three? (1) One is immoral and has not abandoned the stain of immorality. (2) One is envious and has not abandoned the stain of envy. (3) One is miserly and has not abandoned the stain of miserliness. Possessing these three qualities and without having abandoned these three stains, one is deposited in hell as if brought there.

“Bhikkhus, possessing three qualities and having abandoned three stains, one is deposited in heaven as if brought there. What three? (1) One is virtuous and has abandoned the stain of immorality. (2) One is not envious and has abandoned the stain of envy. (3) One is not miserly and has abandoned the stain of miserliness. Possessing these three qualities and having abandoned these three stains, one is deposited in heaven as if brought there.”


Read this translation of Aṅguttara Nikāya 3.10 Malasutta: Stains by Bhikkhu Bodhi on SuttaCentral.net. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net, or DhammaTalks.org.

MN 70 From… Kīṭāgirisutta: At Kīṭāgiri

“…Mendicants, I don’t say that enlightenment is achieved right away. Rather, enlightenment is achieved by gradual training, progress, and practice.

And how is enlightenment achieved by gradual training, progress, and practice?

It’s when someone in whom faith has arisen approaches a teacher.
They pay homage,
lend an ear,
hear the teachings,
remember the teachings,
reflect on their meaning,
and accept them after consideration.
Then enthusiasm springs up;
they make an effort,
weigh up,
and persevere.
Persevering, they directly realize the ultimate truth,
and see it with penetrating wisdom.


Read the entire translation of Majjhima Nikāya 70 Kīṭāgirisutta: At Kīṭāgiri by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net, or DhammaTalks.org.