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Iti 96 Kāmayogasutta: The Bonds

This was said by the Lord, said by the Arahant, so I heard:

“Bhikkhus, one bound by the bond of sensual desire and by the bond of being is a returner, one who comes back to this state. One freed from the bond of sensual desire but still bound by the bond of being is a non-returner, one who does not come back to this state. One freed from the bond of sensual desire and freed from the bond of being is an arahant, one in whom the taints are destroyed.”

This is the meaning of what the Lord said. So in regard to this it was said:

Fettered by both these bonds—
The sensual bond and the bond of being—
Living beings continue in saṁsāra,
Journeying on to birth and death.

Those who abandon sensual desires
But have not reached the taints’ destruction,
Fettered by the bondage of being,
Are declared to be non-returners.

But those who have cut off doubts,
Destroyed conceit and renewal of being,
Who reach the taints’ full destruction,
Though in the world, have gone beyond.

This too is the meaning of what was said by the Lord, so I heard.


Read this translation of Itivuttaka 96 Kāmayogasutta: The Bonds by John D. Ireland on SuttaCentral.net.

Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net, SuttaFriends.org or DhammaTalks.org. Or listen on SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

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SN 25.1 Cakkhusutta: The Eye

At Sāvatthī.

“Mendicants, the eye is impermanent, decaying, and perishing. The ear, nose, tongue, body, and mind are impermanent, decaying, and perishing.

Someone who has faith and confidence in these principles is called a follower by faith. They’ve arrived at inevitability regarding the right path, they’ve arrived at the level of the good person, and they’ve transcended the level of the bad person. They can’t do any deed which would make them be reborn in hell, the animal realm, or the ghost realm. They can’t die without realizing the fruit of stream-entry.

Someone who accepts these principles after considering them with a degree of wisdom is called a follower of the teachings. They’ve arrived at inevitability regarding the right path, they’ve arrived at the level of the good person, and they’ve transcended the level of the bad person. They can’t do any deed which would make them be reborn in hell, the animal realm, or the ghost realm. They can’t die without realizing the fruit of stream-entry.

Someone who understands and sees these principles is called a stream-enterer, not liable to be reborn in the underworld, bound for awakening.”


Read this translation of Saṁyutta Nikāya 25.1 Cakkhusutta: The Eye by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or listen on PaliAudio.com or SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

AN 6.93 Dutiyaabhabbaṭṭhānasutta: Things That Can’t Be Done (2nd)

“Mendicants, these six things can’t be done. What six? A person accomplished in view can’t take conditions to be permanent, happiness, or self. They can’t do deeds with fixed result in the next life. They can’t fall back on purification through noisy, superstitious rites. They can’t seek outside of the Buddhist community for those worthy of religious donations. These are the six things that can’t be done.”


Read this translation of Aṅguttara Nikāya 6.93 Dutiyaabhabbaṭṭhānasutta: Things That Can’t Be Done (2nd) by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or listen on SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

SN 55.22 Mahānāma Sutta: To Mahānāma (2)

I have heard that on one occasion the Blessed One was staying among the Sakyans near Kapilavatthu in the Banyan Park. Then Mahānāma the Sakyan went to the Blessed One and, on arrival, having bowed down to him, sat to one side. As he was sitting there, he said to the Blessed One, “Lord, this Kapilavatthu is rich & prosperous, populous & crowded, its alleys congested. Sometimes, when I enter Kapilavatthu in the evening after visiting with the Blessed One or with the monks who inspire the mind, I meet up with a runaway elephant, a runaway horse, a runaway chariot, a runaway cart, or a runaway person. At times like that my mindfulness with regard to the Blessed One gets muddled, my mindfulness with regard to the Dhamma… the Saṅgha gets muddled. The thought occurs to me, ‘If I were to die at this moment, what would be my destination? What would be my future course?”

“Have no fear, Mahānāma! Have no fear! Your death will not be a bad one, your demise will not be bad. A disciple of the noble ones, when endowed with four qualities, leans toward unbinding, slants toward unbinding, inclines toward unbinding. Which four?

“There is the case where the disciple of the noble ones is endowed with verified confidence in the Awakened One: ‘Indeed, the Blessed One is worthy & rightly self-awakened, consummate in clear-knowing & conduct, well-gone, an expert with regard to the cosmos, unexcelled trainer of people fit to be tamed, teacher of devas & human beings, awakened, blessed.’

“He/she is endowed with verified confidence in the Dhamma: ‘The Dhamma is well taught by the Blessed One, to be seen here & now, timeless, inviting verification, pertinent, to be experienced by the observant for themselves.’

“He/she is endowed with verified confidence in the Saṅgha: ‘The Saṅgha of the Blessed One’s disciples who have practiced well… who have practiced straight-forwardly… who have practiced methodically… who have practiced masterfully—in other words, the four types of noble disciples when taken as pairs, the eight when taken as individual types—they are the Saṅgha of the Blessed One’s disciples: deserving of gifts, deserving of hospitality, deserving of offerings, deserving of respect, the incomparable field of merit for the world.’

“He/she is endowed with virtues that are appealing to the noble ones: untorn, unbroken, unspotted, unsplattered, liberating, praised by the observant, ungrasped at, leading to concentration.

“Suppose a tree were leaning toward the east, slanting toward the east, inclining toward the east. When its root is cut, which way would it fall?”

“In whichever way it was leaning, slanting, and inclining, lord.”

“In the same way, Mahānāma, a disciple of the noble ones, when endowed with four qualities, leans toward unbinding, slants toward unbinding, inclines toward unbinding.”


Read this translation of Saṁyutta Nikāya 55.22 Mahānāma Sutta. To Mahānāma (2) by Bhikkhu Ṭhanissaro on DhammaTalks.org. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net, or SuttaFriends.org. Or listen on SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

SN 12.68 Kosambisutta: Kosambī

[NOTE: It is not possible to know the exact level of attainment of Venerables Saviṭṭha and Narada, but they would at least be stream enterers.]

On one occasion the Venerable Musīla, the Venerable Saviṭṭha, the Venerable Narada, and the Venerable Ānanda were living at Kosambī in Ghosita’s Park.

Then the Venerable Saviṭṭha said to the Venerable Musīla: “Friend Musīla, apart from faith, apart from personal preference, apart from oral tradition, apart from reasoned reflection, apart from acceptance of a view after pondering it, does the Venerable Musīla have personal knowledge thus: ‘With birth as condition, aging-and-death comes to be’?”

“Friend Saviṭṭha, apart from faith, apart from personal preference, apart from oral tradition, apart from reasoned reflection, apart from acceptance of a view after pondering it, I know this, I see this: ‘With birth as condition, aging-and-death comes to be.’”

“Friend Musīla, apart from faith … apart from acceptance of a view after pondering it, does the Venerable Musīla have personal knowledge thus: ‘With existence as condition, birth’?… ‘With ignorance as condition, volitional formations’?”

“Friend Saviṭṭha, apart from faith … apart from acceptance of a view after pondering it, I know this, I see this: ‘With ignorance as condition, volitional formations.’”

“Friend Musīla, apart from faith … apart from acceptance of a view after pondering it, does the Venerable Musīla have personal knowledge: ‘With the cessation of birth comes cessation of aging-and-death’? … … ‘With the cessation of ignorance comes cessation of volitional formations’?”

“Friend Saviṭṭha, apart from faith …. apart from acceptance of a view after pondering it, I know this, I see this: ‘With the cessation of birth comes cessation of aging-and-death.’… ‘With the cessation of ignorance comes cessation of volitional formations.’”

“Friend Musīla, apart from faith, apart from personal preference, apart from oral tradition, apart from reasoned reflection, apart from acceptance of a view after pondering it, does the Venerable Musīla have personal knowledge thus: ‘Nibbāna is the cessation of existence’?”

“Friend Saviṭṭha, apart from faith, apart from personal preference, apart from oral tradition, apart from reasoned reflection, apart from acceptance of a view after pondering it, I know this, I see this: ‘Nibbāna is the cessation of existence.’”

“Then the Venerable Musīla is an arahant, one whose taints are destroyed.”

When this was said, the Venerable Musīla kept silent.

Then the Venerable Narada said to the Venerable Saviṭṭha: “Friend Saviṭṭha, it would be good if I were asked that series of questions. Ask me that series of questions and I will answer you.”

“Then let the Venerable Narada get to answer that series of questions. I will ask the Venerable Narada that series of questions, and let him answer me.”

[Here the Venerable Saviṭṭha asks the Venerable Narada the same series of questions as were addressed to the Venerable Musīla, and he answers in exactly the same way.]

“Then the Venerable Narada is an arahant, one whose taints are destroyed.”

“Friend, though I have clearly seen as it really is with correct wisdom, ‘Nibbāna is the cessation of existence,’ I am not an arahant, one whose taints are destroyed. Suppose, friend, there was a well along a desert road, but it had neither a rope nor a bucket. Then a man would come along, oppressed and afflicted by the heat, tired, parched, and thirsty. He would look down into the well and the knowledge would occur to him, ‘There is water,’ but he would not be able to make bodily contact with it. So too, friend, though I have clearly seen as it really is with correct wisdom, ‘Nibbāna is the cessation of existence,’ I am not an arahant, one whose taints are destroyed.”

When this was said, the Venerable Ānanda asked the Venerable Saviṭṭha: “When he speaks in such a way, friend Saviṭṭha, what would you say about the Venerable Narada?”

“When he speaks in such a way, friend Ānanda, I would not say anything about the Venerable Narada except what is good and favourable.”


Read this translation of Saṁyutta Nikāya 12.68 Kosambisutta: Kosambī by Bhikkhu Bodhi on SuttaCentral.net. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net or DhammaTalks.org. Or listen on PaliAudio.com or SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

MN 68 Naḷakapānasutta: At Naḷakapāna

[NOTE: This is just part of a longer sutta. It is valuable to read the whole thing if you have time.]

…What do you think, Anuruddha and friends? What advantage does the Realized One see in declaring the rebirth of his disciples who have passed away: ‘This one is reborn here, while that one is reborn there’?”

“Our teachings are rooted in the Buddha. He is our guide and our refuge. Sir, may the Buddha himself please clarify the meaning of this. The mendicants will listen and remember it.”

“The Realized One does not declare such things for the sake of deceiving people or flattering them, nor for the benefit of possessions, honor, or popularity, nor thinking, ‘So let people know about me!’ Rather, there are gentlemen of faith who are full of sublime joy and gladness. When they hear that, they apply their minds to that end. That is for their lasting welfare and happiness.

Take a monk who hears this: ‘The monk named so-and-so has passed away. The Buddha has declared that, with the ending of three fetters he’s a stream-enterer, not liable to be reborn in the underworld, bound for awakening.’ And he’s either seen for himself, or heard from someone else, that that venerable had such ethics, such qualities, such wisdom, such meditation, or such freedom. Recollecting that monk’s faith, ethics, learning, generosity, and wisdom, he applies his mind to that end. That too is how a monk lives at ease.

Take a nun who hears this: ‘The nun named so-and-so has passed away. The Buddha has declared that, with the ending of three fetters she’s a stream-enterer, not liable to be reborn in the underworld, bound for awakening.’ And she’s either seen for herself, or heard from someone else, that that sister had such ethics, such qualities, such wisdom, such meditation, or such freedom. Recollecting that nun’s faith, ethics, learning, generosity, and wisdom, she applies her mind to that end. That too is how a nun lives at ease.

Take a layman who hears this: ‘The layman named so-and-so has passed away. The Buddha has declared that, with the ending of three fetters he’s a stream-enterer, not liable to be reborn in the underworld, bound for awakening.’ And he’s either seen for himself, or heard from someone else, that that venerable had such ethics, such qualities, such wisdom, such meditation, or such freedom. Recollecting that layman’s faith, ethics, learning, generosity, and wisdom, he applies his mind to that end. That too is how a layman lives at ease.

Take a laywoman who hears this: ‘The laywoman named so-and-so has passed away. The Buddha has declared that, with the ending of three fetters she’s a stream-enterer, not liable to be reborn in the underworld, bound for awakening.’ And she’s either seen for herself, or heard from someone else, that that sister had such ethics, such qualities, such wisdom, such meditation, or such freedom. Recollecting that laywoman’s faith, ethics, learning, generosity, and wisdom, she applies her mind to that end. That too is how a laywoman lives at ease.

So it’s not for the sake of deceiving people or flattering them, nor for the benefit of possessions, honor, or popularity, nor thinking, ‘So let people know about me!’ that the Realized One declares the rebirth of his disciples who have passed away: ‘This one is reborn here, while that one is reborn there.’ Rather, there are gentlemen of faith who are full of joy and gladness. When they hear that, they apply their minds to that end. That is for their lasting welfare and happiness.”…


Read this translation of Majjhima Nikāya 68 Naḷakapānasutta: At Naḷakapāna by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or listen on PaliAudio.com or SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

AN 6.92 Paṭhamaabhabbaṭṭhānasutta: Things That Can’t Be Done (1st)

[NOTE: A “person accomplished in view” refers to someone who is at least a stream enterer.]

“Mendicants, these six things can’t be done. What six? A person accomplished in view can’t live disrespectful and irreverent toward the Teacher, the teaching, the Saṅgha, or the training. They can’t establish their belief on unreliable grounds. And they can’t generate an eighth rebirth. These are the six things that can’t be done.”


Read this translation of Aṅguttara Nikāya 6.92 Paṭhamaabhabbaṭṭhānasutta: Things That Can’t Be Done (1st) by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or read a different translation on DhammaTalks.org. Or listen on SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

SN 48.12 Paṭhamasaṁkhittasutta: In Brief (1st)

“Mendicants, there are these five faculties. What five? The faculties of faith, energy, mindfulness, immersion, and wisdom. These are the five faculties.

Someone who has completed and fulfilled these five faculties is a perfected one. If they are weaker than that, they’re a non-returner. If they are weaker still, they’re a once-returner. If they are weaker still, they’re a stream-enterer. If they’re weaker still, they’re a follower of the teachings. If they’re weaker still, they’re a follower by faith.”


Read this translation of Saṁyutta Nikāya 48.12 Paṭhamasaṁkhittasutta: In Brief (1st) by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or listen on SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

SN 22.109 Sotāpannasutta: A Stream-Enterer

At Sāvatthī.

“Mendicants, there are these five grasping aggregates. What five? That is, the grasping aggregates of form, feeling, perception, choices, and consciousness. A noble disciple comes to truly understand these five grasping aggregates’ origin, ending, gratification, drawback, and escape. Such a noble disciple is called a stream-enterer, not liable to be reborn in the underworld, bound for awakening.”


Read this translation of Saṁyutta Nikāya 22.109 Sotāpannasutta: A Stream-Enterer by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net. Or listen on SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on the Digital Pali Reader.

SN 55.43 Tatiya Asaṇkheyya Sutta: Incalculable 3

“Monks, there are four kinds of streams of merit and streams of wholesomeness that generate happiness. What four?

  1. The first is when a noble disciple has unshakable confidence in the Buddha… This is the first stream of merit and stream of wholesomeness that generates happiness.
  2. The second is when a noble disciple has unshakable confidence in the Dhamma… This is the second stream of merit and stream of wholesomeness that generates happiness.
  3. The third is when a noble disciple has unshakable confidence in the Saṅgha… This is the third stream of merit and stream of wholesomeness that generates happiness.
  4. The fourth is when a noble disciple is wise. He has the wisdom of understanding the arising and passing away of all conditioned things. That wisdom is noble, penetrative, and leads to the complete ending of suffering. This is the fourth stream of merit and stream of wholesomeness that generates happiness.

These are the four streams of merit and streams of wholesomeness that generate happiness.

“When a noble disciple has these four streams of merit and streams of wholesomeness, it’s not easy to measure how much merit he has by saying, ‘This is the amount of happiness generated by his stream of merit and stream of wholesomeness.’ His merit simply is incalculable, immeasurable and is vast.”

That is what the Buddha said. Then the Blessed One further said,

“The person who desires merit
and is established in wholesomeness,
develops the Eightfold Path
for realizing Nibbāna.
Once he’s reached the core of the Dhamma,
delighting in destroying defilements,
he doesn’t tremble at the approach of Māra.”


Read this translation of Saṁyutta Nikāya 55.43 Tatiya Asaṇkheyya Sutta: Incalculable 3 by Ven. Kiribathgoda Gnananda Thero on SuttaFriends.org. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net. Or listen on SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

SN 55.40 Nandiya Sutta: To Nandiya

On one occasion the Blessed One was staying among the Sakyans near Kapilavatthu in the Banyan Park. Then Nandiya the Sakyan went to the Blessed One and, on arrival, having bowed down to him, sat to one side. As he was sitting there he said to the Blessed One, “Lord, the disciple of the noble ones in whom the factors of stream entry are altogether & in every way lacking: Is he called a disciple of the noble ones who lives heedlessly?

“Nandiya, the person in whom the factors of stream entry are altogether & in every way lacking I call an outsider, one who stands in the faction of the run-of-the-mill. But as to how a disciple of the noble ones dwells in heedlessness and dwells in heedfulness, listen well and pay attention, I will speak.”

“As you say, lord,” Nandiya the Sakyan responded to the Blessed One.

The Blessed One said, “And how, Nandiya, does a disciple of the noble ones dwell in heedlessness? There is the case where a disciple of the noble ones is endowed with verified confidence in the Awakened One: ‘Indeed, the Blessed One is worthy & rightly self-awakened, consummate in clear-knowing & conduct, well-gone, an expert with regard to the cosmos, unexcelled trainer of people fit to be tamed, teacher of devas & human beings, awakened, blessed.’ Content with that verified confidence in the Awakened One, he doesn’t exert himself further in solitude by day or seclusion by night. For him, dwelling thus heedlessly, there is no joy. There being no joy, there is no rapture. There being no rapture, there is no calm. There being no calm, he dwells in pain. When pained, the mind doesn’t become concentrated. When the mind is unconcentrated, phenomena don’t become manifest. When phenomena aren’t manifest, he is reckoned simply as one who dwells in heedlessness.

“And further, the disciple of the noble ones is endowed with verified confidence in the Dhamma: ‘The Dhamma is well taught by the Blessed One, to be seen here & now, timeless, inviting verification, pertinent, to be experienced by the observant for themselves.’ Content with that verified confidence in the Dhamma, he doesn’t exert himself further in solitude by day or seclusion by night. For him, dwelling thus heedlessly, there is no joy. There being no joy, there is no rapture. There being no rapture, there is no calm. There being no calm, he dwells in pain. When pained, the mind doesn’t become centered. When the mind is uncentered, phenomena don’t become manifest. When phenomena aren’t manifest, he is reckoned simply as one who dwells in heedlessness.

“And further, the disciple of the noble ones is endowed with verified confidence in the Saṅgha: ‘The Saṅgha of the Blessed One’s disciples who have practiced well… who have practiced straight-forwardly… who have practiced methodically… who have practiced masterfully—in other words, the four types of noble disciples when taken as pairs, the eight when taken as individual types—they are the Saṅgha of the Blessed One’s disciples: deserving of gifts, deserving of hospitality, deserving of offerings, deserving of respect, the incomparable field of merit for the world.’ Content with that verified confidence in the Saṅgha, he doesn’t exert himself further in solitude by day or seclusion by night. For him, dwelling thus heedlessly, there is no joy. There being no joy, there is no rapture. There being no rapture, there is no calm. There being no calm, he dwells in pain. When pained, the mind doesn’t become centered. When the mind is uncentered, phenomena don’t become manifest. When phenomena aren’t manifest, he is reckoned simply as one who dwells in heedlessness.

“And further, the disciple of the noble ones is endowed with virtues that are appealing to the noble ones: untorn, unbroken, unspotted, unsplattered, liberating, praised by the observant, ungrasped at, leading to concentration. Content with those virtues pleasing to the noble ones, he doesn’t exert himself further in solitude by day or seclusion by night. For him, dwelling thus heedlessly, there is no joy. There being no joy, there is no rapture. There being no rapture, there is no calm. There being no calm, he dwells in pain. When pained, the mind doesn’t become centered. When the mind is uncentered, phenomena don’t become manifest. When phenomena aren’t manifest, he is reckoned simply as one who dwells in heedlessness.

“This is how a disciple of the noble ones dwells in heedlessness.

“And how, Nandiya, does a disciple of the noble ones dwell in heedfulness? There is the case where a disciple of the noble ones is endowed with verified confidence in the Awakened One.… Not content with that verified confidence in the Awakened One, he exerts himself further in solitude by day & seclusion by night. For him, dwelling thus heedfully, joy is born. In one who has joy, rapture is born. The body of one enraptured at heart grows calm. When the body is calm, one feels pleasure. Feeling pleasure, the mind becomes centered. When the mind is centered, phenomena become manifest. When phenomena are manifest, he is reckoned as one who dwells in heedfulness.

“And further, the disciple of the noble ones is endowed with verified confidence in the Dhamma.… verified confidence in the Saṅgha… virtues that are appealing to the noble ones: untorn, unbroken, unspotted, unsplattered, liberating, praised by the observant, ungrasped at, leading to concentration. Not content with those virtues pleasing to the noble ones, he exerts himself further in solitude by day & seclusion by night. For him, dwelling thus heedfully, joy is born. In one who has joy, rapture is born. The body of one enraptured at heart grows calm. When the body is calm, one feels pleasure. Feeling pleasure, the mind becomes centered. When the mind is centered, phenomena become manifest. When phenomena are manifest, he is reckoned as one who dwells in heedfulness.

“This is how a disciple of the noble ones dwells in heedfulness.”


Read this translation of Saṁyutta Nikāya 55.40 Nandiya Sutta. To Nandiya by Bhikkhu Ṭhanissaro on DhammaTalks.org. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net, or SuttaFriends.org. Or listen on SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

DN 5 Kūṭadantasutta: With Kūṭadanta

[NOTE: The following is one of many examples of people who are directly led to stream entry by the Buddha.]

…Then the Buddha taught Kūṭadanta step by step, with a talk on giving, ethical conduct, and heaven. He explained the drawbacks of sensual pleasures, so sordid and corrupt, and the benefit of renunciation. And when he knew that Kūṭadanta’s mind was ready, pliable, rid of hindrances, elated, and confident he explained the special teaching of the Buddhas: suffering, its origin, its cessation, and the path. Just as a clean cloth rid of stains would properly absorb dye, in that very seat the stainless, immaculate vision of the Dhamma arose in the brahmin Kūṭadanta: “Everything that has a beginning has an end.”

Then Kūṭadanta saw, attained, understood, and fathomed the Dhamma. He went beyond doubt, got rid of indecision, and became self-assured and independent of others regarding the Teacher’s instructions. He said to the Buddha, “Would Master Gotama together with the mendicant Saṅgha please accept tomorrow’s meal from me?” The Buddha consented in silence.…


Read this translation of Dīgha Nikāya 5 Kūṭadantasutta: With Kūṭadanta by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or listen on PaliAudio.com or SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

DN 16 From… Mahāparinibbānasutta: The Great Discourse on the Buddha’s Extinguishment—The Mirror of the Dhamma

[NOTE: This teaching was given by the Buddha after the Venerable Ānanda asked about the rebirth of various disciples.]

“It’s hardly surprising that a human being should pass away. But if you should come and ask me about it each and every time someone passes away, that would be a bother for me.

“So Ānanda, I will teach you the explanation of the Dhamma called ‘the mirror of the teaching’. A noble disciple who has this may declare of themselves: ‘I’ve finished with rebirth in hell, the animal realm, and the ghost realm. I’ve finished with all places of loss, bad places, the underworld. I am a stream-enterer! I’m not liable to be reborn in the underworld, and am bound for awakening.’

“And what is that mirror of the teaching?

“It’s when a noble disciple has experiential confidence in the Buddha: ‘That Blessed One is perfected, a fully awakened Buddha, accomplished in knowledge and conduct, holy, knower of the world, supreme guide for those who wish to train, teacher of gods and humans, awakened, blessed.’

“They have experiential confidence in the teaching: ‘The teaching is well explained by the Buddha—visible in this very life, immediately effective, inviting inspection, relevant, so that sensible people can know it for themselves.’

They have experiential confidence in the Saṅgha: ‘The Saṅgha of the Buddha’s disciples is practicing the way that’s good, direct, methodical, and proper. It consists of the four pairs, the eight individuals. This is the Saṅgha of the Buddha’s disciples that is worthy of offerings dedicated to the gods, worthy of hospitality, worthy of a religious donation, worthy of greeting with joined palms, and is the supreme field of merit for the world.’

“And a noble disciple’s ethical conduct is loved by the noble ones, unbroken, impeccable, spotless, and unmarred, liberating, praised by sensible people, not mistaken, and leading to immersion.

“This is that mirror of the teaching.”

And while staying there in Nādika the Buddha often gave this Dhamma talk to the mendicants:

“Such is ethics, such is immersion, such is wisdom. When immersion is imbued with ethics it’s very fruitful and beneficial. When wisdom is imbued with immersion it’s very fruitful and beneficial. When the mind is imbued with wisdom it is rightly freed from the defilements, namely, the defilements of sensuality, desire to be reborn, and ignorance.”

When the Buddha had stayed in Nādika as long as he wished, he addressed Venerable Ānanda, “Come, Ānanda, let’s go to Vesālī.”


Read the entire translation of Dīgha Nikāya 16 Mahāparinibbānasutta: The Great Discourse on the Buddha’s Extinguishment by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or read a different translation on DhammaTalks.org, Ancient-Buddhist-Texts.net or AccessToInsight.org. Or listen on PaliAudio.com or SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

SN 45.35 Paṭhamasāmaññasutta: The Ascetic Life (1st)

At Sāvatthī.

“Mendicants, I will teach you the ascetic life and the fruits of the ascetic life. Listen …

And what is the ascetic life? It is simply this noble eightfold path, that is: right view, right thought, right speech, right action, right livelihood, right effort, right mindfulness, and right immersion. This is called the ascetic life.

And what are the fruits of the ascetic life? The fruits of stream-entry, once-return, non-return, and perfection. These are called the fruits of the ascetic life.”


Read this translation of Saṁyutta Nikāya 45.35 Paṭhamasāmaññasutta: The Ascetic Life (1st) by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net. Or listen on SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

SN 55.55 Sotāpattiphalasutta: The Fruit of Stream-Entry

“Mendicants, when four things are developed and cultivated they lead to the realization of the fruit of stream-entry. What four? Associating with good people, listening to the true teaching, proper attention, and practicing in line with the teaching. When these four things are developed and cultivated they lead to the realization of the fruit of stream-entry.”


Read this translation of Saṁyutta Nikāya 55.55 Sotāpattiphalasutta: The Fruit of Stream-Entry by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or read a different translation on SuttaFriends.org. Or listen on SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

SN 55.44 Aḍḍha Sutta: Rich

“Monks, a noble disciple who has four things is said to be rich, prosperous, and wealthy.

“What four? It’s when a noble disciple has unshakable confidence in the Buddha… the Dhamma… the Saṅgha… and he has the virtue loved by the noble ones… leading to concentration. A noble disciple who has these four things is said to be rich, prosperous, and wealthy.”


Read this translation of Saṁyutta Nikāya 55.44 Aḍḍha Sutta: Rich by Ven. Kiribathgoda Gnananda Thero on SuttaFriends.org. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net. Or listen on SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

AN 9.12 Saupādisesasutta: With Something Left Over

[NOTE: One of the important qualities of a stream enterer is that they won’t be reborn in bad destinations but they can be reborn in good destinations. It seems not everyone in the time of the Buddha believed that was possible.]

At one time the Buddha was staying near Sāvatthī in Jeta’s Grove, Anāthapiṇḍika’s monastery.

Then Venerable Sāriputta robed up in the morning and, taking his bowl and robe, entered Sāvatthī for alms. Then it occurred to him, “It’s too early to wander for alms in Sāvatthī. Why don’t I go to the monastery of the wanderers who follow other paths?” Then he went to the monastery of the wanderers who follow other paths, and exchanged greetings with the wanderers there. When the greetings and polite conversation were over, he sat down to one side.

Now at that time while those wanderers who follow other paths were sitting together this discussion came up among them:

Reverends, no-one who dies with something left over is exempt from hell, the animal realm, or the ghost realm. They’re not exempt from places of loss, bad places, the underworld.”

Sāriputta neither approved nor dismissed that statement of the wanderers who follow other paths. He got up from his seat, thinking, “I will learn the meaning of this statement from the Buddha himself.”

Then Sāriputta wandered for alms in Sāvatthī. After the meal, on his return from almsround, he went to the Buddha, bowed, sat down to one side, and told him what had happened.

“Sāriputta, these foolish, incompetent wanderers following other paths: who are they to know whether someone has something left over or not?

There are these nine people who, dying with something left over, are exempt from hell, the animal realm, and the ghost realm. They’re exempt from places of loss, bad places, the underworld. What nine?

1. There’s a person who has fulfilled ethics and immersion, but has limited wisdom. With the ending of the five lower fetters they’re extinguished between one life and the next. This is the first person …

2. Furthermore, there’s a person who has fulfilled ethics and immersion, but has limited wisdom. With the ending of the five lower fetters they’re extinguished upon landing. This is the second person …

3. With the ending of the five lower fetters they’re extinguished without extra effort. This is the third person …

4. With the ending of the five lower fetters they’re extinguished with extra effort. This is the fourth person …

5. With the ending of the five lower fetters they head upstream, going to the Akaniṭṭha realm*. This is the fifth person …

6. Furthermore, there’s a person who has fulfilled ethics, but has limited immersion and wisdom. With the ending of three fetters, and the weakening of greed, hate, and delusion, they’re a once-returner. They come back to this world once only, then make an end of suffering. This is the sixth person …

7. Furthermore, there’s a person who has fulfilled ethics, but has limited immersion and wisdom. With the ending of three fetters, they’re a one-seeder. They will be reborn just one time in a human existence, then make an end of suffering. This is the seventh person …

8. Furthermore, there’s a person who has fulfilled ethics, but has limited immersion and wisdom. With the ending of three fetters, they go from family to family. They will transmigrate between two or three families and then make an end of suffering. This is the eighth person …

9. Furthermore, there’s a person who has fulfilled ethics, but has limited immersion and wisdom. With the ending of three fetters, they have at most seven rebirths. They will transmigrate at most seven times among gods and humans and then make an end of suffering. This is the ninth person …

These foolish, incompetent wanderers following other paths: who are they to know whether someone has something left over or not? These are the nine people who, dying with something left over, are exempt from hell, the animal realm, and the ghost realm. They’re exempt from places of loss, bad places, the underworld.

Up until now, Sāriputta, I have not felt the need to give this exposition of the teaching to the monks, nuns, laymen, and laywomen. Why is that? For I didn’t want those who heard it to introduce negligence. However, I have spoken it in order to answer your question.”


* the Akaniṭṭha realm is the highest of the Pure Abodes. Only non-returners are born in the Pure Abodes

Read this translation of Aṅguttara Nikāya 9.12 Saupādisesasutta: With Something Left Over by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or listen on SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

AN 9.27 Paṭhamaverasutta: Dangers and Threats (1st)

Then the householder Anāthapiṇḍika went up to the Buddha, bowed, and sat down to one side. The Buddha said to him:

“Householder, when a noble disciple has quelled five dangers and threats, and has the four factors of stream-entry, they may, if they wish, declare of themselves: ‘I’ve finished with rebirth in hell, the animal realm, and the ghost realm. I’ve finished with all places of loss, bad places, the underworld. I am a stream-enterer! I’m not liable to be reborn in the underworld, and am bound for awakening.’

What are the five dangers and threats they have quelled? Anyone who kills living creatures creates dangers and threats both in the present life and in lives to come, and experiences mental pain and sadness. Anyone who refrains from killing living creatures creates no dangers and threats either in the present life or in lives to come, and doesn’t experience mental pain and sadness. So that danger and threat is quelled for anyone who refrains from killing living creatures.

Anyone who steals …

Anyone who commits sexual misconduct …

Anyone who lies …

Anyone who uses alcoholic drinks that cause negligence creates dangers and threats both in the present life and in lives to come, and experiences mental pain and sadness. Anyone who refrains from using alcoholic drinks that cause negligence creates no dangers and threats either in the present life or in lives to come, and doesn’t experience mental pain and sadness. So that danger and threat is quelled for anyone who refrains from using alcoholic drinks that cause negligence.

These are the five dangers and threats they have quelled.

What are the four factors of stream-entry that they have? It’s when a noble disciple has experiential confidence in the Buddha: ‘That Blessed One is perfected, a fully awakened Buddha, accomplished in knowledge and conduct, holy, knower of the world, supreme guide for those who wish to train, teacher of gods and humans, awakened, blessed.’

They have experiential confidence in the teaching: ‘The teaching is well explained by the Buddha—visible in this very life, immediately effective, inviting inspection, relevant, so that sensible people can know it for themselves.’

They have experiential confidence in the Saṅgha: ‘The Saṅgha of the Buddha’s disciples is practicing the way that’s good, direct, methodical, and proper. It consists of the four pairs, the eight individuals. This is the Saṅgha of the Buddha’s disciples that is worthy of offerings dedicated to the gods, worthy of hospitality, worthy of a religious donation, worthy of greeting with joined palms, and is the supreme field of merit for the world.’

And a noble disciple’s ethical conduct is loved by the noble ones, unbroken, impeccable, spotless, and unmarred, liberating, praised by sensible people, not mistaken, and leading to immersion. These are the four factors of stream-entry that they have.

When a noble disciple has quelled these five dangers and threats, and has these four factors of stream-entry, they may, if they wish, declare of themselves: ‘I’ve finished with rebirth in hell, the animal realm, and the ghost realm. I’ve finished with all places of loss, bad places, the underworld. I am a stream-enterer! I’m not liable to be reborn in the underworld, and am bound for awakening.’”


Read this translation of Aṅguttara Nikāya 9.27 Paṭhamaverasutta: Dangers and Threats (1st) by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or listen on SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

SN 55.5 Dutiyasāriputtasutta: With Sāriputta (2nd)

Then Sāriputta went up to the Buddha, bowed, and sat down to one side. The Buddha said to him:

“Sāriputta, they speak of a ‘factor of stream-entry’. What is a factor of stream-entry?”

“Sir, the factors of stream-entry are associating with good people, listening to the true teaching, proper attention, and practicing in line with the teaching.”

“Good, good, Sāriputta! For the factors of stream-entry are associating with good people, listening to the true teaching, proper attention, and practicing in line with the teaching.

Sāriputta, they speak of ‘the stream’. What is the stream?”

“Sir, the stream is simply this noble eightfold path, that is: right view, right thought, right speech, right action, right livelihood, right effort, right mindfulness, and right immersion.”

“Good, good, Sāriputta! For the stream is simply this noble eightfold path, that is: right view, right thought, right speech, right action, right livelihood, right effort, right mindfulness, and right immersion.

Sāriputta, they speak of ‘a stream-enterer’. What is a stream-enterer?”

“Sir, anyone who possesses this noble eightfold path is called a stream-enterer, the venerable of such and such name and clan.”

“Good, good, Sāriputta! For anyone who possesses this noble eightfold path is called a stream-enterer, the venerable of such and such name and clan.”


Read this translation of Saṁyutta Nikāya 55.5 Dutiyasāriputtasutta: With Sāriputta (2nd) by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or read a different translation on SuttaFriends.org or DhammaTalks.org. Or listen on SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

SN 55.38 Vassasutta: Rain

“Mendicants, suppose it rains heavily on a mountain top, and the water flows downhill to fill the hollows, crevices, and creeks. As they become full, they fill up the pools. The pools fill up the lakes, the lakes fill up the streams, and the streams fill up the rivers. And as the rivers become full, they fill up the ocean. In the same way, a noble disciple has experiential confidence in the Buddha, the teaching, and the Saṅgha, and the ethics loved by the noble ones. These things flow onwards; and, after crossing to the far shore, they lead to the ending of defilements.”


Read this translation of Saṁyutta Nikāya 55.38 Vassasutta: Rain by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or read a different translation on SuttaFriends.org. Or listen on SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

AN 6.119–139 Tapussasutta… About Tapussa, Etc.

“Mendicants, having six qualities the householder Tapussa is certain about the Realized One, sees the deathless, and lives having realized the deathless. What six?

  1. Experiential confidence in the Buddha,
  2. the teaching,
  3. and the Saṅgha,
  4. and noble ethics,
  5. knowledge,
  6. and freedom.

Having these six qualities the householder Tapussa is certain about the Realized One, sees the deathless, and lives having realized the deathless.

“Mendicants, having six qualities the householders Bhallika … Sudatta Anāthapiṇḍika … Citta of Macchikāsaṇḍa … Hatthaka of Āḷavī … Mahānāma the Sakyan … Ugga of Vesālī … Uggata … Sūra of Ambaṭṭha … Jīvaka Komārabhacca … Nakula’s father … Tavakaṇṇika … Pūraṇa … Isidatta … Sandhāna … Vijaya … Vijayamāhita … Meṇḍaka … the lay followers Vāseṭṭha … Ariṭṭha … and Sāragga are certain about the Realized One, see the deathless, and live having realized the deathless. What six? Experiential confidence in the Buddha, the teaching, and the Saṅgha, and noble ethics, knowledge, and freedom. Having these six qualities the lay follower Sāragga is certain about the Realized One, sees the deathless, and lives having realized the deathless.”


Read this translation of Aṅguttara Nikāya 6.119 Tapussasutta: About Tapussa by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Read this translation of Aṅguttara Nikāya 6.120–139 Bhallikādisutta: About Bhallika, Etc. by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or listen on SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

SN 55.17 Dutiya Mittāmacca Sutta: Friends 2

“Monks, you have friends, relatives and family members who you have sympathy for. If they listen to your advice, you should establish them in the four factors of stream-entry. You should encourage them to have the four factors of stream-entry. What four?

“You should establish them and encourage them to have unshakable confidence in the Buddha…

“Monks, there might be change in the four primary elements—earth, water, fire, and air—but a noble disciple with unshakable confidence in the Buddha would never change. In this context, ‘change’ means that such a noble disciple will be reborn in hell, the animal world, or the ghost world: this is not possible.

“You should establish them and encourage them to have the unshakable confidence in the Dhamma…

“You should establish them and encourage them to have the unshakable confidence in the Saṅgha…

“You should establish them and encourage them to have virtue loved by the noble ones… leading to concentration.

“Monks, there might be change in the four primary elements—earth, water, fire, and air—but a noble disciple with the ethical conduct loved by the noble ones would never change. In this context, ‘change’ means that such a noble disciple will be reborn in hell, the animal world, or the ghost world: this is not possible.

“Monks, you should establish your friends, relatives and family members who you have sympathy for, in these four factors of stream-entry. If they listen to your advice, you should encourage them to have these four factors of stream-entry.”


Read this translation of Saṁyutta Nikāya 55.17 Dutiya Mittāmacca Sutta: Friends 2 by Ven. Kiribathgoda Gnananda Thero on SuttaFriends.org. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net. Or listen on SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

AN 6.94 Tatiyaabhabbaṭṭhānasutta: Things That Can’t Be Done (3rd)

“Mendicants, these six things can’t be done. What six? A person accomplished in view can’t murder their mother or father or a perfected one. They can’t maliciously shed the blood of the Realized One. They can’t cause a schism in the Saṅgha. They can’t acknowledge another teacher. These are the six things that can’t be done.”


Note: A “person accomplished in view” is synonymous with a stream-enterer. A “perfected one” is the translation for “arahant.” Shedding the blood of a Realized one refers to harming a Buddha physically to the point of making him bleed, not things like damaging Buddha statues—although a stream enterer probably wouldn’t do that any way. And a schism in the Sangha has a very specific meaning according to the Vinaya and can only be done by monastics—although it’s also unlikely that a lay stream enterer would cause any kind of intentional disharmony.

Read this translation of Aṅguttara Nikāya 6.94 Tatiyaabhabbaṭṭhānasutta: Things That Can’t Be Done (3rd) by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or listen on SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

SN 55.1 Rāja Sutta: A Universal King

At the city of Sāvatthī.

There the Buddha said, “Monks, suppose a universal king were to rule over these four continents. After death, he’s reborn in heaven, among the gods of the Tāvatiṁsa. There he entertains himself in the Nandana Park, attended by a band of goddesses, and provided with divine pleasures. Still, as he’s lacking four things, he’s not free from taking rebirth in hell, the animal world, or the ghost world. He’s not free from taking rebirth in miserable worlds.

“Now, suppose a noble disciple wears a robe made of old dirty cloths and lives on any type of food given to him by people. Still, as he has four factors in his life, he’s free from rebirth in hell, the animal world, and the ghost world. He’s free from taking rebirth in miserable worlds.

“What four? It’s when a noble disciple has unshakable confidence in the Buddha, ‘That Blessed One is liberated, self-enlightened, has true knowledge and pure conduct, attained Nibbāna, knower of worlds, supreme trainer of beings, teacher of gods and humans, the most generous and the most fortunate.’

“He has unshakable confidence in the Dhamma: ‘The Dhamma is well explained by the Buddha—visible in this very life, immediately effective, inviting inspection, applied to oneself and wise people can realize it for themselves.’

“He has unshakable confidence in the Saṅgha: ‘The order of the Buddha’s disciples practice the pure way, upright way, wise way, and generous way. It consists of the four pairs, the eight individuals. The order of the Buddha’s disciples is worthy of offerings, worthy of hospitality, worthy of gifts, worthy of greeting with joined palms, and is the supreme field of merit for the world.’

“A noble disciple has virtue which is loved by the noble ones, unbroken, flawless, unblemished, not caught up in craving, freed from wrong views, praised by wise people and leads to concentration.

“These are the four factors of stream-entry he has. And, monks, gaining rulership over these four continents is not worth one sixteenth of gaining these four factors.”


Read this translation of Saṁyutta Nikāya 55.1 Rāja Sutta: A Universal King by Ven. Kiribathgoda Gnananda Thero on SuttaFriends.org. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net or DhammaTalks.org. Or listen on PaliAudio.com or SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

MN 48 Kosambiyasutta: The Mendicants of Kosambi

[Note: This is the second half of a sermon that the Buddha gives to the quarreling monks of Kosambi. It’s certainly worth reading the complete sutta if you have time.]

…And how does the view that is noble and emancipating lead one who practices it to the complete ending of suffering? It’s when a mendicant has gone to a wilderness, or to the root of a tree, or to an empty hut, and reflects like this, ‘Is there anything that I’m overcome with internally and haven’t given up, because of which I might not accurately know and see?’ If a mendicant is overcome with sensual desire, it’s their mind that’s overcome. If a mendicant is overcome with ill will, dullness and drowsiness, restlessness and remorse, doubt, pursuing speculation about this world, pursuing speculation about the next world, or arguing, quarreling, and disputing, continually wounding others with barbed words, it’s their mind that’s overcome. They understand, ‘There is nothing that I’m overcome with internally and haven’t given up, because of which I might not accurately know and see. My mind is properly disposed for awakening to the truths.’ This is the first knowledge they have achieved that is noble and transcendent, and is not shared with ordinary people.

Furthermore, a noble disciple reflects, ‘When I develop, cultivate, and make much of this view, do I personally gain serenity and quenching?’ They understand, ‘When I develop, cultivate, and make much of this view, I personally gain serenity and quenching.’ This is their second knowledge …

Furthermore, a noble disciple reflects, ‘Are there any ascetics or brahmins outside of the Buddhist community who have the same kind of view that I have?’ They understand, ‘There are no ascetics or brahmins outside of the Buddhist community who have the same kind of view that I have.’ This is their third knowledge …

Furthermore, a noble disciple reflects, ‘Do I have the same nature as a person accomplished in view?’ And what, mendicants, is the nature of a person accomplished in view? This is the nature of a person accomplished in view. Though they may fall into a kind of offense for which rehabilitation has been laid down, they quickly disclose, clarify, and reveal it to the Teacher or a sensible spiritual companion. And having revealed it they restrain themselves in the future. Suppose there was a little baby boy. If he puts his hand or foot on a burning coal, he quickly pulls it back. In the same way, this is the nature of a person accomplished in view. Though they may still fall into a kind of offense for which rehabilitation has been laid down, they quickly reveal it to the Teacher or a sensible spiritual companion. And having revealed it they restrain themselves in the future. They understand, ‘I have the same nature as a person accomplished in view.’ This is their fourth knowledge …

Furthermore, a noble disciple reflects, ‘Do I have the same nature as a person accomplished in view?’ And what, mendicants, is the nature of a person accomplished in view? This is the nature of a person accomplished in view. Though they might manage a diverse spectrum of duties for their spiritual companions, they still feel a keen regard for the training in higher ethics, higher mind, and higher wisdom. Suppose there was a cow with a baby calf. She keeps the calf close as she grazes. In the same way, this is the nature of a person accomplished in view. Though they might manage a diverse spectrum of duties for their spiritual companions, they still feel a keen regard for the training in higher ethics, higher mind, and higher wisdom. They understand, ‘I have the same nature as a person accomplished in view.’ This is their fifth knowledge …

Furthermore, a noble disciple reflects, ‘Do I have the same strength as a person accomplished in view?’ And what, mendicants, is the strength of a person accomplished in view? The strength of a person accomplished in view is that, when the teaching and training proclaimed by the Realized One are being taught, they pay heed, pay attention, engage wholeheartedly, and lend an ear. They understand, ‘I have the same strength as a person accomplished in view.’ This is their sixth knowledge …

Furthermore, a noble disciple reflects, ‘Do I have the same strength as a person accomplished in view?’ And what, mendicants, is the strength of a person accomplished in view? The strength of a person accomplished in view is that, when the teaching and training proclaimed by the Realized One are being taught, they find inspiration in the meaning and the teaching, and find joy connected with the teaching. They understand, ‘I have the same strength as a person accomplished in view.’ This is the seventh knowledge they have achieved that is noble and transcendent, and is not shared with ordinary people.

When a noble disciple has these seven factors, they have properly investigated their own nature with respect to the realization of the fruit of stream-entry. A noble disciple with these seven factors has the fruit of stream-entry.”

That is what the Buddha said. Satisfied, the mendicants were happy with what the Buddha said.


Read this translation of Majjhima Nikāya 48 Kosambiyasutta: The Mendicants of Kosambi by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net or DhammaTalks.org. Or listen on PaliAudio.com or SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

Khp 6 From… Ratana Sutta — Treasures

…Those who have seen clearly the noble truths
well-taught by the one deeply discerning—
regardless of what [later] might make them heedless—
will come to no eighth state of becoming.3
     This, too, is an exquisite treasure in the Saṅgha.
     By this truth may there be well-being.

At the moment of attaining sight,
one abandons three things:
     identity-views, uncertainty,
     & any attachment to habits & practices.4
One is completely released
from the four states of deprivation,5
and incapable of committing
the six great wrongs.6
     This, too, is an exquisite treasure in the Saṅgha.
     By this truth may there be well-being.…


3. The person who has reached this stage in the practice will be reborn at most seven more times.

4. These three qualities are the fetters abandoned when one gains one’s first glimpse of unbinding at stream-entry (the moment when one enters the stream to full awakening).

5. Four states of deprivation: rebirth as an animal, a hungry ghost, an angry demon, or a denizen of hell. In the Buddhist cosmology, none of these states is eternal.

6. According to the commentary, the six great wrongs are: murdering one’s mother, murdering one’s father, murdering an arahant (fully awakened individual), wounding a Buddha, causing a schism in the Saṅgha, or choosing anyone other than a Buddha as one’s foremost teacher. The first five are listed in AN 5:129 as leading immediately to hell after death.

Read the entire translation of Khuddakapāṭha 6 Ratana Sutta — Treasures by Bhikkhu Ṭhanissaro on DhammaTalks.org. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net, SuttaFriends.org, Ancient-Buddhist-Texts.net or AccessToInsight.org. Or listen on SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

AN 6.97 Ānisaṁsasutta: Benefit

“Mendicants, these are the six benefits of realizing the fruit of stream-entry. What six?

  1. You’re bound for the true teaching.
  2. You’re not liable to decline.
  3. You suffer only for a limited period.
  4. You have unshared knowledge.
  5. You’ve clearly seen causes
  6. and the phenomena that arise from causes.

These are the six benefits of realizing the fruit of stream-entry.”


“Unshared knowledge” means things not known by ordinary people.

Read this translation of Aṅguttara Nikāya 6.97 Ānisaṁsasutta: Benefit by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or read a different translation on DhammaTalks.org. Or listen on SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

Dhp 178 From… Loka Vagga: The World

178. Better than sole dominance
over the earth,
going to heaven,
or lordship over all the worlds
is the fruit of stream entry.


Read the entire translation of Dhammapada 13 Loka Vagga: The World (167-178) by Ven. Kiribathgoda Gnananda Thero on SuttaFriends.org. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net, DhammaTalks.org, Ancient-Buddhist-Texts.net or AccessToInsight.org. Or listen on SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

Dhp 174–176 From… Lokavagga: The World

Blind is the world,
few are those who clearly see.
Only a handful go to heaven,
like a bird freed from a net.

The miserly don’t ascend to heaven,
it takes a fool to not praise giving.
The wise celebrate giving,
and so find happiness in the hereafter.

The fruit of stream-entry is better
than being the one king of the earth,
than going to heaven,
than lordship over all the world.


Read the entire translation of Dhammapada 167–178 Lokavagga by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net, SuttaFriends.org, DhammaTalks.org, Ancient-Buddhist-Texts.net or AccessToInsight.org. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.