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AN 8.28 Dutiyabalasutta: Powers (2nd)

Then Venerable Sāriputta went up to the Buddha, bowed, and sat down to one side. The Buddha said to him:

“Sāriputta, how many powers does a mendicant who has ended the defilements have that qualify them to claim: ‘My defilements have ended’?”

“Sir, a mendicant who has ended the defilements has eight powers that qualify them to claim: ‘My defilements have ended.’

What eight? Firstly, a mendicant with defilements ended has clearly seen with right wisdom all conditions as truly impermanent. This is a power that a mendicant who has ended the defilements relies on to claim: ‘My defilements have ended.’

Furthermore, a mendicant with defilements ended has clearly seen with right wisdom that sensual pleasures are truly like a pit of glowing coals. This is a power that a mendicant who has ended the defilements relies on to claim: ‘My defilements have ended.’

Furthermore, the mind of a mendicant with defilements ended slants, slopes, and inclines to seclusion. They’re withdrawn, loving renunciation, and they’ve totally done with defiling influences. This is a power that a mendicant who has ended the defilements relies on to claim: ‘My defilements have ended.’

Furthermore, a mendicant with defilements ended has well developed the four kinds of mindfulness meditation. This is a power that a mendicant who has ended the defilements relies on to claim: ‘My defilements have ended.’

Furthermore, a mendicant with defilements ended has well developed the four bases of psychic power … the five faculties … the seven awakening factors … the noble eightfold path. This is a power that a mendicant who has ended the defilements relies on to claim: ‘My defilements have ended.’

A mendicant who has ended the defilements has these eight powers that qualify them to claim: ‘My defilements have ended.’”


Read this translation of Aṅguttara Nikāya 8.28 Dutiyabalasutta: Powers (2nd) by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net or DhammaTalks.org. Or listen on SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

Or read a translation in Deutsch, বাংলা, Español, Bahasa Indonesia, 日本語, မြန်မာဘာသာ, Português, Русский, සිංහල, ไทย, Tiếng Việt, or 汉语. Learn how to find your language.

Dhp 90–99 Arahantavagga: Arahants

    In one who
has gone the full distance,
is free from sorrow,
is everywhere
    fully released,
has abandoned all bonds:
    no fever is found.
90

The mindful keep active,
don’t delight in settling back.
They renounce every home,
        every home,
like swans taking off from a lake.
91

Not hoarding,
having comprehended food,
their pasture–emptiness
& freedom without sign:
    their course,
like that of birds through space,
    can’t be traced.

Effluents ended,
independent of nutriment,
their pasture–emptiness
& freedom without sign:
    their trail,
like that of birds through space,
    can’t be traced.
92-93

He whose senses are steadied
    like stallions
well-trained by the charioteer,
his conceit abandoned,
    free of effluent,
    Such:
even devas adore him.

Like the earth, he doesn’t react–
    cultured,
    Such,
like Indra’s pillar,
like a lake free of mud.
For him
    –Such–
there’s no traveling on.
Calm is his mind,
calm his speech
     & his deed:
one who’s released through right knowing,
    pacified,
    Such.
94-96

        The man
faithless / beyond conviction
ungrateful / knowing the Unmade
a burglar / who has severed connections
    who’s destroyed
his chances / conditions
who eats vomit: / has disgorged expectations:
    the ultimate person.
97

In village or wilds,
valley, plateau:
that place is delightful
where arahants dwell.
98

Delightful wilds
where the crowds don’t delight,
those free from passion
    delight,
for they’re not searching
for sensual pleasures.
99


Read this translation of Dhammapada VII . Arahants by Bhikkhu Ṭhanissaro on DhammaTalks.org. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net, SuttaFriends.org, DhammaTalks.org, Ancient-Buddhist-Texts.net or AccessToInsight.org. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

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SN 35.238 Āsīvisopamasutta: The Simile of the Vipers

“Mendicants, suppose there were four lethal poisonous vipers. Then a person would come along who wants to live and doesn’t want to die, who wants to be happy and recoils from pain.

They’d say to him, ‘Mister, here are four lethal poisonous vipers. They must be periodically picked up, washed, fed, and put to sleep. But when one or other of these four poisonous vipers gets angry with you, you’ll meet with death or deadly pain. So then, mister, do what has to be done.’

Then that man, terrified of those four poisonous vipers, would flee this way or that.

They’d say to him, ‘Mister, there are five deadly enemies chasing you, thinking: “When we catch sight of him, we’ll murder him right there!” So then, mister, do what has to be done.’

Then that man, terrified of those four poisonous vipers and those five deadly enemies, would flee this way or that.

They’d say to him, ‘Mister, there’s a sixth hidden killer chasing you with a drawn sword, thinking: “When I catch sight of him, I’ll chop off his head right there!” So then, mister, do what has to be done.’

Then that man, terrified of those four poisonous vipers and those five deadly enemies and the hidden killer, would flee this way or that.

He’d see an empty village. But whatever house he enters is vacant, deserted, and empty. And whatever vessel he touches is vacant, hollow, and empty.

They’d say to him, ‘Mister, there are bandits who raid villages, and they’re striking now. So then, mister, do what has to be done.’

Then that man, terrified of those four poisonous vipers and those five deadly enemies and the hidden killer and the bandits, would flee this way or that.

He’d see a large deluge, whose near shore is dubious and perilous, while the far shore is a sanctuary free of peril. But there’s no ferryboat or bridge for crossing over.

Then that man thought, ‘Why don’t I gather grass, sticks, branches, and leaves and make a raft? Riding on the raft, and paddling with my hands and feet, I can safely reach the far shore.’

And so that man did exactly that. Having crossed over and gone beyond, the brahmin stands on the far shore.

I’ve made up this simile to make a point. And this is the point.

‘Four lethal poisonous vipers’ is a term for the four primary elements: the elements of earth, water, fire, and air.

‘Five deadly enemies’ is a term for the five grasping aggregates, that is: form, feeling, perception, choices, and consciousness.

‘The sixth hidden killer with a drawn sword’ is a term for relishing and greed.

‘Empty village’ is a term for the six interior sense fields. If an astute, competent, clever person investigates this in relation to the eye, it appears vacant, hollow, and empty. If an astute, competent, clever person investigates this in relation to the ear … nose … tongue … body … mind, it appears vacant, hollow, and empty.

‘Bandits who raid villages’ is a term for the six exterior sense fields. The eye is struck by both agreeable and disagreeable sights. The ear … nose … tongue … body … mind is struck by both agreeable and disagreeable ideas.

‘Large deluge’ is a term for the four floods: the floods of sensual pleasures, desire to be reborn, views, and ignorance.

‘The near shore that’s dubious and perilous’ is a term for substantial reality.

‘The far shore, a sanctuary free of peril’ is a term for extinguishment.

‘The raft’ is a term for the noble eightfold path, that is: right view, right thought, right speech, right action, right livelihood, right effort, right mindfulness, and right immersion.

‘Paddling with hands and feet’ is a term for rousing energy.

‘Crossed over, gone beyond, the brahmin stands on the shore’ is a term for a perfected one.”


Note: “Perfected one” is the translation for arahant.

Read this translation of Saṁyutta Nikāya 35.238 Āsīvisopamasutta: The Simile of the Vipers by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net. Or listen on SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

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Iti 96 Kāmayogasutta: The Bonds

This was said by the Lord, said by the Arahant, so I heard:

“Bhikkhus, one bound by the bond of sensual desire and by the bond of being is a returner, one who comes back to this state. One freed from the bond of sensual desire but still bound by the bond of being is a non-returner, one who does not come back to this state. One freed from the bond of sensual desire and freed from the bond of being is an arahant, one in whom the taints are destroyed.”

This is the meaning of what the Lord said. So in regard to this it was said:

Fettered by both these bonds—
The sensual bond and the bond of being—
Living beings continue in saṁsāra,
Journeying on to birth and death.

Those who abandon sensual desires
But have not reached the taints’ destruction,
Fettered by the bondage of being,
Are declared to be non-returners.

But those who have cut off doubts,
Destroyed conceit and renewal of being,
Who reach the taints’ full destruction,
Though in the world, have gone beyond.

This too is the meaning of what was said by the Lord, so I heard.


Read this translation of Itivuttaka 96 Kāmayogasutta: The Bonds by John D. Ireland on SuttaCentral.net.

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SN 12.68 Kosambisutta: Kosambī

[NOTE: It is not possible to know the exact level of attainment of Venerables Saviṭṭha and Narada, but they would at least be stream enterers.]

On one occasion the Venerable Musīla, the Venerable Saviṭṭha, the Venerable Narada, and the Venerable Ānanda were living at Kosambī in Ghosita’s Park.

Then the Venerable Saviṭṭha said to the Venerable Musīla: “Friend Musīla, apart from faith, apart from personal preference, apart from oral tradition, apart from reasoned reflection, apart from acceptance of a view after pondering it, does the Venerable Musīla have personal knowledge thus: ‘With birth as condition, aging-and-death comes to be’?”

“Friend Saviṭṭha, apart from faith, apart from personal preference, apart from oral tradition, apart from reasoned reflection, apart from acceptance of a view after pondering it, I know this, I see this: ‘With birth as condition, aging-and-death comes to be.’”

“Friend Musīla, apart from faith … apart from acceptance of a view after pondering it, does the Venerable Musīla have personal knowledge thus: ‘With existence as condition, birth’?… ‘With ignorance as condition, volitional formations’?”

“Friend Saviṭṭha, apart from faith … apart from acceptance of a view after pondering it, I know this, I see this: ‘With ignorance as condition, volitional formations.’”

“Friend Musīla, apart from faith … apart from acceptance of a view after pondering it, does the Venerable Musīla have personal knowledge: ‘With the cessation of birth comes cessation of aging-and-death’? … … ‘With the cessation of ignorance comes cessation of volitional formations’?”

“Friend Saviṭṭha, apart from faith …. apart from acceptance of a view after pondering it, I know this, I see this: ‘With the cessation of birth comes cessation of aging-and-death.’… ‘With the cessation of ignorance comes cessation of volitional formations.’”

“Friend Musīla, apart from faith, apart from personal preference, apart from oral tradition, apart from reasoned reflection, apart from acceptance of a view after pondering it, does the Venerable Musīla have personal knowledge thus: ‘Nibbāna is the cessation of existence’?”

“Friend Saviṭṭha, apart from faith, apart from personal preference, apart from oral tradition, apart from reasoned reflection, apart from acceptance of a view after pondering it, I know this, I see this: ‘Nibbāna is the cessation of existence.’”

“Then the Venerable Musīla is an arahant, one whose taints are destroyed.”

When this was said, the Venerable Musīla kept silent.

Then the Venerable Narada said to the Venerable Saviṭṭha: “Friend Saviṭṭha, it would be good if I were asked that series of questions. Ask me that series of questions and I will answer you.”

“Then let the Venerable Narada get to answer that series of questions. I will ask the Venerable Narada that series of questions, and let him answer me.”

[Here the Venerable Saviṭṭha asks the Venerable Narada the same series of questions as were addressed to the Venerable Musīla, and he answers in exactly the same way.]

“Then the Venerable Narada is an arahant, one whose taints are destroyed.”

“Friend, though I have clearly seen as it really is with correct wisdom, ‘Nibbāna is the cessation of existence,’ I am not an arahant, one whose taints are destroyed. Suppose, friend, there was a well along a desert road, but it had neither a rope nor a bucket. Then a man would come along, oppressed and afflicted by the heat, tired, parched, and thirsty. He would look down into the well and the knowledge would occur to him, ‘There is water,’ but he would not be able to make bodily contact with it. So too, friend, though I have clearly seen as it really is with correct wisdom, ‘Nibbāna is the cessation of existence,’ I am not an arahant, one whose taints are destroyed.”

When this was said, the Venerable Ānanda asked the Venerable Saviṭṭha: “When he speaks in such a way, friend Saviṭṭha, what would you say about the Venerable Narada?”

“When he speaks in such a way, friend Ānanda, I would not say anything about the Venerable Narada except what is good and favourable.”


Read this translation of Saṁyutta Nikāya 12.68 Kosambisutta: Kosambī by Bhikkhu Bodhi on SuttaCentral.net. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net or DhammaTalks.org. Or listen on PaliAudio.com or SC-Voice.net. Or explore the Pali on DigitalPaliReader.online.

SN 22.58 Sammāsambuddhasutta: The Fully Awakened Buddha

At Sāvatthī.

“Mendicants, a Realized One, a perfected one, a fully awakened Buddha is freed by not grasping, due to disillusionment, dispassion, and cessation regarding form. They’re called a fully awakened Buddha. A mendicant freed by wisdom is also freed by not grasping, due to disillusionment, dispassion, and cessation regarding form. They’re called a mendicant freed by wisdom.

A Realized One, a perfected one, a fully awakened Buddha is freed by not grasping, due to disillusionment, dispassion, and cessation regarding feelingperceptionchoicesconsciousness. They’re called a fully awakened Buddha. A mendicant freed by wisdom is also freed by not grasping, due to disillusionment, dispassion, and cessation regarding consciousness. They’re called a mendicant freed by wisdom.

What, then, is the difference between a Realized One, a perfected one, a fully awakened Buddha, and a mendicant freed by wisdom?”

“Our teachings are rooted in the Buddha. He is our guide and our refuge. Sir, may the Buddha himself please clarify the meaning of this. The mendicants will listen and remember it.”

“Well then, mendicants, listen and pay close attention, I will speak.”

“Yes, sir,” they replied. The Buddha said this:

“A Realized One, a perfected one, a fully awakened Buddha gives rise to the unarisen path, gives birth to the unborn path, and explains the unexplained path. They know the path, understand the path, and are experts in the path. And now the disciples live following the path; they acquire it later.

This is the difference between a Realized One, a perfected one, a fully awakened Buddha, and a mendicant freed by wisdom.”


Read this translation of Saṁyutta Nikāya 22.58 Sammāsambuddhasutta: The Fully Awakened Buddha by Bhikkhu Sujato on SuttaCentral.net. Or read a different translation on SuttaCentral.net, or DhammaTalks.org.